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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Folks,

I am looking at tackling this job soon, and it seems like a massive PITA. Are there any walkthroughs or writeups for this work?

I did search, and this seems to be the best out there, but it certainly isn't step-by-step. I have access to a lift, but I am still very intimidated.

http://forums.swedespeed.com/showthread.php?166926-P2R-suspension-solved
 

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I did the full Poly install on 2 Rs and one S80 T6.

When we did the conversion on my car, we decided to separate the rear frame from the car and it was a PITA. :D

We burned the rubber and attacked the sleeves with an air hacksaw.


















On the other two cars, we decided to try another method, and it was a lot easier.

We lowered the frame on one side and attacked the rubber with a hole saw like this: https://www.contorion.de/elektrower...92868&ef_id=UvGPWwAAAWsy4k4e:20150914204048:s

It was straight forward.

Here you can see the rubber removed, but the sleeves still in place (My friends V70 R):


My other friends S80 T6











It really is not that hard.
 

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My dealer has a bushing press (for removal and reinstallation) - was worth paying them three hours labour for the job.


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You made it a lot harder on yourself removing the whole rear end. Most of the rear bushings can be easily pressed out with a 36mm socket and a foot of 3/16" all-thread with some nuts and washers. The real pain in the balls one is #5 that needs a big like 62mm tube and an endplate to press with. I did all of them except the subframe bushings on jack stands with hand tools and my homemade presses in a little over a day. I didn't burn a single bushing throughout the whole procedure, they all pressed out just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You made it a lot harder on yourself removing the whole rear end. Most of the rear bushings can be easily pressed out with a 36mm socket and a foot of 3/16" all-thread with some nuts and washers. The real pain in the balls one is #5 that needs a big like 62mm tube and an endplate to press with. I did all of them except the subframe bushings on jack stands with hand tools and my homemade presses in a little over a day. I didn't burn a single bushing throughout the whole procedure, they all pressed out just fine.
I am halfway through the job now. I will say that pressing them out absolutely did not work, I galled threads and broke a ratchet trying to get a single bushing out. Burning them really isn't too bad, except for setting random local things on fire. You definitely do not need to drop the cradle to do the bushings unless you were doing the cradle bushings themselves. Even then, I think you could probably get them out without dropping the cradle.

The big bushing in front, and wrestling all the suspension members back into place were the two worst parts
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I am halfway through the job now. I will say that pressing them out absolutely did not work, I galled threads and broke a ratchet trying to get a single bushing out. Burning them really isn't too bad, except for setting random local things on fire. You definitely do not need to drop the cradle to do the bushings unless you were doing the cradle bushings themselves. Even then, I think you could probably get them out without dropping the cradle.

The big bushing in front, and wrestling all the suspension members back into place were the two worst parts
A couple other tips that help out:

All of the holes for the bushings are chamfered on one side, because the factory bushings are one piece and go in from one side. The poly bushings are two piece, and have to go in both sides of each hole. The non-chamfered edge is sharp and has some burrs on it. Hitting it with some sandpaper for ~30 seconds made a world of difference getting the poly in easily.

The black structural part in front of the inner toe link bushings is fiberglass. It will burn. Protect it with aluminum foil before torching. The same goes for the brake lines over top of the big bushings in front.

When reassembling the suspension, most of the bushings for the suspension link that the shock attaches to need some trimming to fit. Also, put this link in first, you cannot fit it or tighten the bolts when the front link is in place.

I am so glad this is over; what a PITA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So, since I wrecked my R and had to buy another, I got to do this install again. I learned a few more things.

The big bushings in the front of the cradle don't need to be burned - there is enough void to just slip in a sawzall blade and cut the sleeve at an angle.

You can buy/rent the Advance Auto Parts "Master Balljoint Press Kit" to press some of these things out to limit the burning. I elected to do this on the inner control arm bushings, and also to install the IPD camber correction bushings in their place. MUCH easier than trying to use a sledge and big socket to pound the bushings in.

I also installed poly rear subframe bushings from Powerflex (black, "race" hardness) this time. It sucked. The bushings are pressed in from below AND have a big barb on top for retention. They cannot be easily cut or drilled like the front subframe bushings because the rearmost two have a metal plate integrated into the bushing. To install mine, I lowered the subframe on each side (left everything attached except the exhaust's rearmost hanger) and cut off the top barb of the bushings with a sawzall. Then I used a big round piece from the press kit on top while jacking the subframe back up to the body. Once the weight of the car was pressing down, a few smacks with a mini sledge on the surrounding subframe allowed the bushings to release. Be careful, this is dangerous and causes the car to drop too. Also, pounding too hard on the subframe will bend it inward...guess how I know? These bushings are a massive PITA, which is probably why so few people replace them.

I hope I never have to do this job again, it sucks soooooooooooooooooooooo hard.
 
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