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Discussion Starter #41 (Edited)
With my engine, I also got my cam back. I took some photos of the cam lobe to show you what I tried to describe about the missing wear pattern. The cam lobe pictured is cylinder 6 exhaust. Anyway, notice that the lobe is shiny all the way around. For this reason, the machine shop said it needed replacing. I just wanted to post of some pictures.



 

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Discussion Starter #42
The end of 2015 just blasted by. Things got shelved for a few months. I am working on the 164 again. Mostly just stripping everything out so I can have a bare unibody from which to build up from. Also, ordering the parts I need to build the engine back up. More to come, soon.
 

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The end of 2015 just blasted by. Things got shelved for a few months.
No rush - its a hobby!

I was just looking at your post #40 and the photo of the patch on the inner rear fender around the shock mount. Its hard to confirm; but, something looks amiss there. That is a very common rust trouble spot on the 140 and I expect the 160. There is a reenforcement plate welded at that spot on the body and the plate has a hole in the bottom of it which forms the outer support for the top shock mount. The upper shock mount is supposed to fit between the body channel and the reenforcement plate.



In this photo of the rear wheel well on my car, at the top of the photo you can just see the bottom of that reenforcing plate with the hole for the shock mount. The top of the shock fits in behind that plate. In your photo, it looks like the outer support for the shock mount is completely missing.

Replacement reenforcement plates are definitely available from Scandcar and perhaps VP Auto and CVI.
 

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Discussion Starter #44
I will need to look into this. I think there is a blow up in the Volvo green book, otherwise VP has the drawings. Thanks for pointing it out!
 

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Discussion Starter #45
I can't tell if the rear damper top mount is indeed supposed to be in double shear or not. The drawing in the service manual shows a plate in between (vertical direction) the damper and the body, but the bolt is only in single shear. Perhaps the top mount on the 140 and 164 were different. Does anyone have a photo to say otherwise?
 

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Discussion Starter #47 (Edited)
Finally, some progress on the 164. I've been working over the last few months but don't have much to show.

The engine is going back together. I opted for a K cam, instead of the original C. I don't have a good reason why except that I understand they are a bit sportier. I know how the car runs with a C cam, so I want to try the K. I also kept the stock lifters (new lifters, just same design) and am reusing the pushrods. Are the valve clearances the same between the C and K cams for the B30?

I also opted for an aluminum cam gear. I wanted a steel gear but a steel set is about 300% more expensive if you can find one. We'll see how steel-aluminum goes. I got the timing gears off RockAuto for $100. Otherwise, everything else is stock.

Question: when the dots on the timing gears are closest to each other, does that mean cylinder one is at TDC? My service manual says when the marks "are opposite one another, cylinder 6 is at TDC." I don't know what opposite means in this case. I ask because it is important for getting the timing roughly correct when reinstalling the distributor drive and distributor.



Also, I have stripped the car down to a rolling shell. Except that I don't know how to remove the trim on the rain gutter or the rear quarter windows. Does anyone have any tips? I may delete the rain gutter trim but I want the option to put it back on. It seems it is just clamped on to the body with no plastic clips or anything. Do the rear quarter windows come out the same way as the rear window, meaning it's just held in by the seal? Here's a shot of the trim (above window) and rear quarter window.





Lastly, I damaged the windshield while cutting it out of the Butyl. Does anyone know if this can be repaired? I accidentally scraped it with the removal tool and it just crumbled at the bottom most layer.



More to come soon.
 

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Discussion Starter #48

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Question: when the dots on the timing gears are closest to each other, does that mean cylinder one is at TDC? My service manual says when the marks "are opposite one another, cylinder 6 is at TDC." I don't know what opposite means in this case. I ask because it is important for getting the timing roughly correct when reinstalling the distributor drive and distributor.

Lastly, I damaged the windshield while cutting it out of the Butyl. Does anyone know if this can be repaired? I accidentally scraped it with the removal tool and it just crumbled at the bottom most layer.
The picture in the factory Green Book for my 140 shows the dot on the crankshaft gear lining up right next to (closest) the dash on the camshaft gear. I did it that way and still managed to screw things up. When you insert the oil pump / distributor drive, there is an offset slot in the distributor drive that determines the rotor phasing of the distributor. You insert the pump with the #1 cylinder at TDC and align the slot at the specified angle relative to the mounting two holes for the distributor. The Green Book just said do this at TDC. It did not say anything about aligning the timing marks or that it should be #1 TDC firing position. I ended up aligning the distributor for TDC firing on #4. It made the restart of the engine a challenge. Eventually figured out what was wrong and did the easy fix of swapping the #1-#4 and #2 - #3 plug wires on the distributor. In retrospect it was a dumb ass error. I chalk it up to being in assembly mode rather than thinking mode and following to the letter the instructions in the service manual, which were somewhat deficient. Don't do what I did.

The sharp edges in the fractured area of the glass may result in stress concentration points that result in the subsequent development of cracks in the glass due to vibration and thermal changes. I don't think the glass repair guys can do anything with their adhesive repairs; but, they may be able to smooth down and polish the area out removing the sharp edges which act as stress risers. I would talk to them and show them a photo and see if they would be prepared to try a fix. I do know that if a crack, bullseye, chip is close to the edge of the glass, they will not attempt (or not provide a guarantee for) the repair. You could leave it, reinstall the glass as is and it might be just fine or it might develop a crack which would be a hassle. If the glass is at all scratched up, consider a new windshield. They are available and I expect that in the Detroit area you could probably get one for less than $200. The cost of new glass may not be that much more than the cost of an attempted repair to the existing glass.
 

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Lesky said:
when the dots on the timing gears are closest to each other, does that mean cylinder one is at TDC?
Yes.

This is all from memory, but you don't need to stress too hard about the distributor drive gear, there's a mark on the distributor that indicates TDC #1. It might not be at the same place as this pic, but there will be a mark like this somewhere.



So here's what you do:

-Set engine to TDC #1
-Drop drive gear in
-Install distributor in desired orientation of the body (you don't have to bolt it down) Basically you want it where the vacuum housing or clips or whatever won't hit the engine while adjusting timing.
-Look at where the rotor is pointing relative to the mark on the distributor body.
-Note how far the rotor would need to rotate to line up with the mark.
-Remove distributor
-Lift drive gear and rotate it approximately how far the rotor was off.
-Repeat if needed to get the rotor in the ballpark of pointing at the mark. Obviously you can't adjust less than a single tooth so it'll never be quite perfect, that's what the timing adjustment is for.
-Bolt down distributor, then loosen the adjusting clamp and rotate the distributor body to line the mark up with the rotor.
-That mark will also line up with the hole for the #1 spark plug wire, so make sure you get the plug wires in right too.

If the rotor is pointing at that mark when the engine is at TDC then the engine will start enough to set timing with it running.


I'm 95% sure that the quarter windows come out and go in just like the rear window.
As for the chrome gutter trim, I have never had success getting that off (I always bend it up), but obviously there are tricks. Might want to talk to a classic car restoration shop and ask if they know the tricks, maybe someone would come by and do it for you for a case of brew.
 

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Discussion Starter #52 (Edited)
Thanks for the info about the distributor. I got the distributor drive in but haven't installed the distributor yet. I am waiting for painting weather before finishing off the engine.

Also, the rear quarter windows do come out just like the rear window. I was able to persuade them out with some filler spreaders and some silicone lube.

Lastly, the rain gutter trim sort of "rolls off." I was able to remove it by pushing it down towards the ground and rolling up the bottom edge to get it started. This worked for the straight sections. Where the A and C pillars come up to the roof, it can be removed carefully with a putty knife. No kinks and should go back on fine if I decide to reuse it.

I've been playing with some drivetrain ideas as I'd really like a manual transmission. Also, the BW35 isn't suited for today's speed limits. In Michigan, the speed limit is 70 mph, but more like 80 - 90 mph to keep up with traffic. The Volvo M400 and M410 are impossible to find and parts even more so. So, considering a T5 - because they're quite prevalent - I've come up with the following shift curves comparing the BW35 to a World Class T5 out of a third generation Camaro (Mustangs have the similar ratios, it turns out). From the Chevy 305 V8, the clutch is approximately the same size as Volvo's (10" to Volvo's 9.5"). The flywheel has the same tooth count (153) and outer diameter (12 7/8"). I just don't know if the crank bolt pattern is the same between the Chevy 305 and Volvo B30s. 6 bolt crank, sure, but the bolt pattern diameter is the last variable. The B30 crank bolt pattern is roughly 3". The Camaro T5 ratios are 2.95, 1.94, 1.34, 1.00, & 0.62. My diff is 3.31:1.

I assumed a shift RPM of 3000 although the BW35 shifts way before that. My BW35 would be in 3rd gear by 30 MPH. Just an idea so far. I haven't measured to see if the shifter position of the T5 will work on the 164.

 

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Do you ever read Turbobricks? There are lots of T5 installs going on over there, most find that the trans fits just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #54
Honestly, I haven't been on turbo bricks in a few years. Thanks for the tip, though!
 

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Discussion Starter #55
Long overdue update.

So far, engine is finished. Built up to stock specs with all the original internals, minus the fiber cam gear. Also, I installed a K cam, rather than the traditional C cam. Mocked up for a T5 and the measurements suggest that the shifter position is almost perfect. Thinking of ways to use the BW35 bellhousing on a T5 with a hydraulic throw out bearing. Hopefully the bellhousing is not too long.

More to come, soon.
 

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Discussion Starter #56
Back to the rear shock mount topic. Another forum member confirmed with me that his '72 164 is factory single shear at the rear shock top mount. Additionally, my service manuals only show single shear rear top mounts. I think this confirms that my car (a '73) indeed has single shear rear shock top mounts.
 

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My '73 142 also does NOT have the outer support.

My rear end is currently out of the car and I was just test fitting the new Bilsteins this past weekend. A simple bolt though the Shock mounting hole into the frame.

I can also confirm that I have repaired the wheel well, about 20 years ago. I just riveted in a patch panel and sprayed over it with Rubberized undercoat. I'll double check tonight the exact area of the patch, but I don't recall it being that close to the top shock mount location, I think it is further forward where the water and gravel spray from the wheel would help erode the metal (I used to drive hard on gravel logging roads a lot up north)
 

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Keep it up. I love these. My Mom had a 74, after years of driving GM junk. This is it, circa 1980:

Back to the rear shock mount topic. Another forum member confirmed with me that his '72 164 is factory single shear at the rear shock top mount. Additionally, my service manuals only show single shear rear top mounts. I think this confirms that my car (a '73) indeed has single shear rear shock top mounts.
 

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Back to the rear shock mount topic. Another forum member confirmed with me that his '72 164 is factory single shear at the rear shock top mount. Additionally, my service manuals only show single shear rear top mounts. I think this confirms that my car (a '73) indeed has single shear rear shock top mounts.
Makes me wonder if I wasted time and money going to the effort of replacing that outer plate when I did the sheet metal work on my car.

The top bolt in simple cantilever would make shock installation much easier. The distance between the inside face of the threaded portion in the body and the outside support was just slightly larger that the width of the top shock bushing with the result that the top mount moved side to side with a clank - clank going over bumps. Took me forever to figure out where the noise was coming from. I had to jam a washer up in there to eliminate the clearance.
 
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