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Greetings All - I'm new here!! I was raised in the rear-facing 3rd row of Volvo wagons and there was a Volvo in my driveway growing up throughout the 80's and 90's.

I'm thinking about getting back to my roots with a high or kinda high, older, V70 or something. Why should I get that 200k wagon?

Thanks!
 

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you shouldn't unless you have deep pockets and are a shade tree mechanic. Find your roots in a new(er) Volvo!!!!!
 

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Because you like buying parts and want to learn how to be a mechanic?
 

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You have lots of free time and money to throw down a hole ?
 

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I think if you can do your own work and can find one for a suitably low price then it might be doable. If you're having to take it to a mechanic for everything then it's probably cheaper to just lease something new. I would also avoid anything with AWD with those miles.
 

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Sometimes buying a car with higher mileage is good because all the major problems have already been dealt with. I don’t know if that’s the case with v70’s though


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Engine should be solid, no leak.
Condition of transmission is the key in a high mileage car. This is all about how far it can run further.
Other stuff can be fixed reasonably, a/c, suspension, etc.
 

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The advantage of buying an older Volvo is you now have a car with fewer electronic controls, which leads to lower maintenance costs, and quicker diagnosis. You would have to find a vehicle with little corrosion, and be able to pay for repairs as needed. Chances are this would be less expensive than buying a late model car.
 

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The advantage of buying an older Volvo is you now have a car with fewer electronic controls, which leads to lower maintenance costs, and quicker diagnosis. You would have to find a vehicle with little corrosion, and be able to pay for repairs as needed. Chances are this would be less expensive than buying a late model car.
Yeh, but still need some luck to find a car in good condition. Suspension usually is worn out. AWD gears may got issues, and so on. I bought one at 211k miles, spent $2k for repairing in 5 years so far, 233k miles now. I feel lucky as engine is solid, A/C is cold, tires and brakes are good. I am now waiting to see when transmission will retire.

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High Mileage is like a roulette Wheel

Hello all,
My first post after getting back into Volvo (my first car was a 1967 (122S) right out of school). Earlier this year I bought a 2008 Saab (Yeah I know) 9-5 with 196K miles on it. Body was 9.5 out of 10 and the interior was impeccable. Car ran fine and the prior owner had replaced a lot of major parts. Anyway, two weeks ago, I am causing down the highway and the car goes dead! I had a spare DI cassette, which is a standard emergency part for the Saab's. The car started right up but couldn't get out of its own way - the turbo was blown!

Now, the car just passed 200K miles and I have a real life expense of $1000 (for the turbo - and other things that will snap/break/or shear-off as I attempt to get the turbo out - the local Volvo indie wouldn't touch the car) against a car value of who knows. So, I wound up trading it for an '08 XC-70 with 65K miles on it.

The Saab might have run for another 100K miles but you never know!
 

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Volvo's can be very reliable cars lasting many many miles, but parts can be expensive this side of the Atlantic, and unless you do your own work you may wind up spending more than it is worth on maintenance.

That was certainly the case on my 2009 S80 T6. I was priding myself in keeping it alive and on the road in remarkable condition at 160K miles but in the end I threw in the towel because I was spending almost CPO S90 payment money every month on average in maintenance.

On the other hand, my 20 year old P80 ( 1991-1996 850's, 1997-2000 S70 and v70, 1997-2002 C70 Couple and 1998-2005 C70 Convertible) has been much more reasonable. Cheaper parts, much available used on ebay, and easier to work on (in moist cases) has made it way more worthwhile to keep alive.
 

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Hello all,
My first post after getting back into Volvo (my first car was a 1967 (122S) right out of school). Earlier this year I bought a 2008 Saab (Yeah I know) 9-5 with 196K miles on it. Body was 9.5 out of 10 and the interior was impeccable. Car ran fine and the prior owner had replaced a lot of major parts. Anyway, two weeks ago, I am causing down the highway and the car goes dead! I had a spare DI cassette, which is a standard emergency part for the Saab's. The car started right up but couldn't get out of its own way - the turbo was blown!

Now, the car just passed 200K miles and I have a real life expense of $1000 (for the turbo - and other things that will snap/break/or shear-off as I attempt to get the turbo out - the local Volvo indie wouldn't touch the car) against a car value of who knows. So, I wound up trading it for an '08 XC-70 with 65K miles on it.

The Saab might have run for another 100K miles but you never know!
Oh yeah, I had several Saabs. Those low pressure turbo's were a constant problem, though I thought they had them solved by 2008...

The funny part is that the high pressure Mitsubishi TD04's they used in the Aero models were much more reliable.

All that said, this is a bit of an apples and oranges comparison. While Saab and Volvo may both have been Swedish, their designs and parts were very very different.


The big "end of car" thing you have to look our for on older V70's (OP doesn't say which year model he is considering, so I am going to assume we are talking P80, but this also applies to many later models) is the water pump and the 5 speed automatic transmission.

The water pumps Volvo used were prone to seizing as they aged. My Volvo specialist recommends replacing them every time you do the belts, because you are in there anyway. If it goes on a older model which has a timing belt, the serpentine and timing belts share some pulleys, so it could be a catastrophic end of engine type of scenario. If it goes on one of the newer ones with a timing chain, it is less catastrophic, but still rather expensive.

The 5 speed automatic has also gone through many iterations. Newer ones are better, but some of the older ones had issues with shifting flares which can over time result in destruction of the transmission. If you get one of the older ones (~2000-2005?) I would immediately take it to a dealer, have the transmission software updated to the latest version, install the latest B4 servo cover and give it a fluid flush using the IPD flush kit, to make sure you get all the old fluid out. That should extend its life and give it many more years of trouble free operation, presuming it isn't already damaged.
 

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I have lots of experience with old V70s. We traded in a new-bought 1999 V70 wagon for a new-bought 2001 V70XC wagon that we still have, with over 240k miles on it now. Great car -- runs really smooth still and no visible rust; undercarriage is still really good despite being parked outdoors in New England climate for over half of its life (though over the last several years it has been protected in a garage to prolong its life). But I've spent an average of about USD $2500/yr for the last decade keeping it on the road, in repair and maintenance costs -- worth it to me, but I wouldn't have spent this money on hardly any other car (including any post-2006 Volvos, which I dislike when compared with my 2001 V70XC -- I'd have ditched a post-2006 Volvo if it was costing me $2500/yr to keep running).

I like the design of my 2001 (both inside and out) vastly more than any Volvo wagon that has been made since about 15 years ago; I wish that Volvo still had this design. I love these things in my 2001 Volvo that are absent in new Volvos today: all the climate-control and audio-control buttons, the lack of an infotainment touchscreen, the lack of any chrome on the interior, the hard (opaque) sunroof cover, the car not locking when it starts to move, the absence of auto-start/stop, the presence of an 18.5-gallon gas tank (new Volvos today have pathetically small tanks), the presence of an engine-temperature gauge, the presence of analog tachometer and speedometer. This is why I keep spending money to keep my car running. (It doesn't hurt that we spend very little on other things for this car besides gasoline; annual insurance and taxes are next to nothing, compared to what I spend on our newer cars.) I wish I had a computer screen with Google maps (that had nothing else in it -- just the maps!), and I wish I had ACC, but there's not a lot more that I'm missing in my 2001 V70XC.
Great car, but if you get one of these, go in with your eyes wide open. Have the car put up on a rack and the undercarriage carefully checked.
 
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