SwedeSpeed - Volvo Performance Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1990 740 gl. have changed and timed timing belt,cleaned throttle,sparkplugs etc?? this car can not pull sting out of a sick cats ass, <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/rolleyes.gif" BORDER="0"> on take off. i know it only came with about 114 horse power. power is ok after gaining speed. is that as good as it gets?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63,543 Posts
Re: why is my 740 so damn slow?? (twobear35216)

Yep, they are sloooooooooooooooooooow
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,169 Posts
Re: why is my 740 so damn slow?? (twobear35216)

TwoBear,<p>There's a grwoing number of people who will say that 114 bhp is as good as it gets. These folks are typically those who moved on to newer models instead of exploiting the power potential of a B230. It's not only possible, but relatively simple to get 160 bhp out of a B230.<p>Getting reliable horsepower out of a Volvo B230F engine will require the following modifications to be made:<p>a. Ensure that the engine and transmission are in good working order and not exhibiting any sign of wear or impending mechanical failure. This will require a complete inspection of the engine.<p>b. Select an appropriate camshaft to increase engine breathing. A VX Cam will generally provide fair emissions compliance and will boost output by 20 Bhp. Incrementally greater increases in horsepower (total gains of 23 to 25 Bhp) will require the use of either a "K" or "H" Cam respectively. These camshafts are listed under PNs 1336775-0 and 1346419 respectively. Of these, the "H" cam is the most aggressive with 12mm lift/272 degrees of duration (intake), 11.5 mm lift/268 degrees of duration (exhaust). <p>It must be noted, however, that the "H" cam will undermine exhaust emissions to such a degree that 49 State EPA Compliance will be impossible to achieve. What ever Volvo cam you choose will cost approximately $300 (US) and can be otained through just about any dealer state-side. Don't forget to measure and re-adjust the valves after any cam work!<p>c. Increase the valve area to improve upper-rpm cylinder filling. Stock B230s are fitted with 44mm intake and 35 mm exhaust valves. A typical upgrade kit consists of 46mm intake and 38 mm exhaust valves, mated to a mildly ported cylinder head treated with a three-angle valve seat grind. Five angle or radiused grinds will provide incrementally greater cylinder filling, particularly at high rpms (4000 rpm and over). <p>The cost of valve kits varies condierably, but expect to pay about $300 (US) for a complete set of valves and approximately $500-800 for the boring and seat installation/grinding. Choose a highly reputable shop for any cylinder head work as the money committed at this point is well worth it!. <p>Higher rate valve springs need not be fitted unless *routine* forays above 5000 rpm are envisaged.<p>It is worthwhile to note that the cam/head upgrades can be ordered from Steffansson Automotive for approximately 7200Kr or about $1500 (US) with the return of a comparable, stock cylinder head. This unit will deliver 150 Bhp "out of the box" and features a SAM Cam, very similar in profile to the "H" Cam offered by AB Volvo.<p>You can achieve a very similar effect of a big valve kit by unmasking the intake and exhaust valves. This requires some custom cylinder head work, but is quite rewarding.<p>d. Complete the head work with an Extrude Honed intake manifold and grind a taper to the leading edge of the throttle plate (so called "knife edging"). Extrude Honing at B230 intake manifold will run about $400.00 (US), whereas knife-edging can be done at home at little/no cost.<p>e. Modify the air box, removing the warm air induction flap (if fitted). This unit simply "pops out" of the housing and increases airflow through the stock box with revs. The mod is far simpler (and much more effective) than the trick cone filters which tend to draw warmer air from the engine compartment (bad!). Cost = $0.<p>f. Remove the rear muffler and insert a replacement pipe (~$40). This will increase noise slighly at idle and cruise, but will not be too intrusive as long as the original routing to the extreme rear of the car remains intact. Back pressure will be reduced which, although somewhat self-defeating at low rpm where it is useful to assist in scavenging, will improve engine output past 3000 rpm. One does not have to use a 2 1/2" cat-back pipe for the kinds of power we're talking about. Properly modified, the stock system provides very good flow. <p>These modifications will yeild an engine capable of producing a reliable 160 Bhp at 5500-6000 rpm. The torque curve will be somewhat softer until the engine "gets on the cam" at 3000 rpm. At that point port velocities will be sufficiently high as to promote good filling and scavenging. Off-throttle response of the engine + mods will be very good, but not quite as robust as the stock B230F in the 1000 to 2000 range.<p>Greater power (165-175) can be reached through the use of higher compression pistons. These will provide the same effect as shaving the head, but without the undesirable effect which shaving/milling as on timing belt tension etc. A good tuner will first have the end-gap carefully measured and the head cc'ed to determine the exact cylinder volume prior to choosing pistons. With the proper care and good quailty fuel (AKI 91 or higher) it is generally considered safe to reach 10.0:1 compression ratio. Be advised, however, that your locale's extremely warm conditions can increase an engine's propensity to detonation -- so proceed carefully!<p>g. Finally, some modification to your car's automatic transmission will be required to suit your engine's new power curve. Select a torque converter (~$500) which stalls at 2400 rpm as this will allow your engine to quickly reach its powerband. Resist any urge to move to a ultra-low rear axle ratio as this will make 1st gear practically unusable and upset relaxed highway cruising.<p>Fit a transmission ($250) and thermostatically-controlled engine oil ($350) coolers as part of the mod to support engine longevity, especially in the heat and humidity common to Georgia. Speaking of heat, now is a good time to switch to synthetic lubes for the engine, transmission and rear axle. I would suggest Mobil 1 engine oil in the 20W50 and 10W40 weights for summer and winter respectively. AMSOil transmission fluids (ATF) and gear lubes (80W90) should provide outstanding service for your use.<p>Less labor, the cost to reach 135 Bhp safely = ~$1500. Cost to reach 160 Bhp safely = ~ $3000. This is low to the cost of other alternatives (a turbo motor swap which would require significant labor, cyclical replacement of the turbo unit (at $1500.00 per unit) and higher gas consumption -- or the purhcase of a new/newer car).<p>Hope this helps,<BR><BR>
<i>Modified by RearWheelPaul at 10:56 PM 7-30-2006</i>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63,543 Posts
Re: why is my 740 so damn slow?? (RearWheelPaul)

All well and good. (sigh) <br>All you have then is 160HP <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/eek.gif" BORDER="0"> <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/rolleyes.gif" BORDER="0"> (WOW!)<br>A whole lot of money wasted on a car that STILL will get blown off by almost any stock compact on the road.<br>Not worth the money IMO (Oh, and you won't pass emmisions according the Paul)<br>Not really helpful if you live in a yearly emmision sticker state
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
39,289 Posts
Re: why is my 740 so damn slow?? (RearWheelPaul)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>RearWheelPaul</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">Less labor, the cost to reach 135 Bhp safely = ~$1500. Cost to reach 160 Bhp safely = ~ $3000. This is low to the cost of a turbo motor swap which would require significant labor, cyclical replacement of the turbo unit (at $1500.00 per unit) and higher gas consumption.<p>Hope this helps,</TD></TR></TABLE><p>Good info, Paul but I would have to agree with JRL, above.<p>By the way, and forgive my "ignorance", why would there be a "cyclical replacement of the turbo unit"? I understand that turbos do not last forever but, with good maintenance, a turbocharger (water cooled) should last at least 250,000 or even 350,000 miles.<p>Yannis
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,368 Posts
Re: why is my 740 so damn slow?? (twobear35216)

As I own both sides of the coin in this really. Yes the 91 744 NA is slow on really bad days till it gets a head of steam up. In hot weather with teh A/C on it is all the more so. But once underway it is really fine for everyday use. And in cooler (never snow, or hard nipple cold like back in NJ) weather like we have here in SC most of the year, but NOT July and Aug it is a fine car for what it is. But since I as well own a 96 965 low power by some peoples standards for a 2.9L I6. I agree with JRL and Yannis(turbo life not withstanding). For a mere few dollars more then a stock 2.3L and way less headaches the 2.9L is like nite and day. When you compare it to a 2.3L with mods. And even with the 135-160hp options and $3000. A good 960 is still 188Hp and 201tq out of the box. And it is for the most part a 7 seris that has gone upscale. So I for one see no reason to mess with the 740 Just find a 960 if it is THAT slow for you. I thou have the best of both worlds. 7 seris MPG when I wish it. And 9 seris power when I wish it. Thou the MPG between the 7 and 9 are not far apart. I jsut find myself really driving the 9 when i really need A/C and do not wish to keep my foot in the pedal to get the 7 to run fast. For sure the 7 is a car that you need to keep your foot into (on boil) to get there. The 9 is more relaxed and not in need of alot of planning for heavy traffic merges. That is my take on it. <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://********************/smile/emthup.gif" BORDER="0"> <p>BTW you say you changed the plugs? What plugs did you change to? If you merely took out BOSCH and put back BOSCH then you did not do much. MY car has NGK's in it and they do alot to make up for some lack of guts over the BOSCH. OR at least I have found that to be true in the 2.3L. The 2.9L has the BOSCH. And NGKs I am told and have seen do little for that eng. IF I try them I will know for sure. But have yet to change out the plugs in the 2.9L<p><br><i>Modified by Nato740 at 9:02 PM 7-30-2006</i><BR><BR>
<i>Modified by Nato740 at 9:06 PM 7-30-2006</i>
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,169 Posts
Re: why is my 740 so damn slow?? (GrecianVolvo)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>GrecianVolvo</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">By the way, and forgive my "ignorance", why would there be a "cyclical replacement of the turbo unit"? I understand that turbos do not last forever but, with good maintenance, a turbocharger (water cooled) should last at least 250,000 or even 350,000 miles.<p>Yannis</TD></TR></TABLE><p>The average turbo life, according to an internet-based study that I did a few years ago is ~134K. More info can be obtained at:<p><A HREF="http://www3.telus.net/Volvo_Books/turbo1.html" TARGET="_blank">http://www3.telus.net/Volvo_Books/turbo1.html</A><p>Also note the statement from a Volvo coporate rep, highlted in red, in the following article:<p><A HREF="http://www3.telus.net/Volvo_Books/turbo2.html" TARGET="_blank">http://www3.telus.net/Volvo_Books/turbo2.html</A><p><BR><BR>
<i>Modified by RearWheelPaul at 10:58 PM 7-30-2006</i>
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,169 Posts
Re: why is my 740 so damn slow?? (JRL)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>JRL</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">All well and good. (sigh) <br>All you have then is 160HP <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/eek.gif" BORDER="0"> <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/rolleyes.gif" BORDER="0"> (WOW!)<br>A whole lot of money wasted on a car that STILL will get blown off by almost any stock compact on the road.<br>Not worth the money IMO (Oh, and you won't pass emmisions according the Paul)<br>Not really helpful if you live in a yearly emmision sticker state</TD></TR></TABLE><p>First, it's important to read the question. TwoBear didn't ask about alternatives to a 700-series car. The question was whether 114 bhp is as good as it gets.<p>Second, 160 bhp is just a few bhp shy of a B5254F's output. Moreover, the modified 8 valve will exhibit slightly better torque response than the newer twenty valve engine below 3000 rpm. It will put this power down without torque steer -- and certaintly more effectively if a limited slip differential is used.<p>Third, a 700-series car weighs 100 lbs less than a S/V 70 and has better weight distribution.<p>Fourth, an older car costs far less to insure and operate. No worries about 4C recalibrations, SUM updates, wonky e-throttles, notoriously problematic evaporators, expensive re-keys, the list goes on...<p>Fifth, $3000 in mods is less than new car payments for a year -- most of which goes against the cost of the loan, I might add. <p>Examined from these perspectives, it appears that TwoBear has a valid question for which there is a clear answer. It may not be the route that you (JRL) would pursue, but to each his (or her) own.<br><BR><BR>
<i>Modified by RearWheelPaul at 10:48 PM 7-30-2006</i>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Re: why is my 740 so damn slow?? (twobear35216)

This may have nothing to do with your situation but I had a 760 (had it for 13 years) and towards the end it was really slow and the problem was that it has two fuel pumps in sequence and only one was working. Simple solution for me at the time. I have a 2004 v70R now and needless to say, speed is not a problem
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
39,289 Posts
Re: why is my 740 so damn slow?? (RearWheelPaul)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>RearWheelPaul</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote"><p>The average turbo life, according to an internet-based study that I did a few years ago is ~134K. More info can be obtained at:<p><A HREF="http://www3.telus.net/Volvo_Books/turbo1.html" TARGET="_blank">http://www3.telus.net/Volvo_Books/turbo1.html</A><p>Also note the statement from a Volvo coporate rep, highlted in red, in the following article:<p><A HREF="http://www3.telus.net/Volvo_Books/turbo2.html" TARGET="_blank">http://www3.telus.net/Volvo_Books/turbo2.html</A><p><br><i>Modified by RearWheelPaul at 10:58 PM 7-30-2006</i></TD></TR></TABLE><p>I understand but I worked at a Volvo retailer for 12 years; I only saw two or three cars with turbo failures below 100,000 miles. I saw UNTOLD amount fo turbo cars (all flavors) being traded or sold with 150,000 miles or more. MANY of them were over the 250,000-mile mark. Way too many. And original turbos, of course (based on what their owners had told us).<p>Yannis
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,169 Posts
Re: why is my 740 so damn slow?? (GrecianVolvo)

I suspect that, by the time a Volvo reaches the mileage at which turbo failures occur, most owners have left the dealership service department in favor of an independent garage. There's also the multiple-owner syndrome, where any sense of what has been done to the car is lost by the time a car falls into the hands of the third owner.<p>The samle size of the survey data that I had compiled was too small to be statistically significant (ideally, a sample size of 1,000 or more is needed to keep the margin of error low). Regardless, half of the engine-related tech questions that I receive from folks concern turbo-related issues. This explains why there are so many companies dealing in aftermarket turbo parts -- from complete units to rotating assemblies.<p>Granted, the newer Volvos don't seem to be encountering many problems as they did in the past. I attribute this to better boost control (ill-advised adjustments to boost can be really hard on turbos -- especially when operating near the surge line) and the wider use of synthetic oils. Nevertheless, I suspect that we'll still see many of these cars enounter turbo problems by the 200,000 to 250,000 mile mark.<p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
691 Posts
Re: why is my 740 so damn slow?? (twobear35216)

I would guess the timing is off somewhere - either cam or spark. When either one of these events is advanced/delayed, you essentially feel a shift in the powerband. My wife's NA 940 may only have 114HP, but it gets around just fine. With the 4.10 rear, it's almost 'sprightly' off the line... almost. Certainly enough to cut & thrust in traffic and pass slower vehicles on the highway without underwear soilage.<p>Paul's suggestions are good. I have taken my 240 and injected new life into it with a K-cam, larger / free-flowing exhaust, less restrictive intake, additional fuel and advanced ignition timing. Guesstimate ~140HP. Putting in a shorter rear end will give you added punch from a standing start at the expense of highway RPM / top speed / MPG. I will be replacing my 3.31 rear with a welded 3.91 soon. Eventually, the car will get a rebuilt, tight-squish B21 with a very large turbo.<p>Which brings me to my recommendation - If you really need / want a lot more power, I'd pony up for a turbo. Dollar for dollar, nothing will give you as much potential as a turbocharged engine. Depending on your skill and mechanical knowledge, there are at least three major ways to do this. In order of increasing skill / risk, they are:<br>1) Sell your 740 and buy a 7/9 Turbo<br>2) Purchase a used Turbo engine and swap it into your 740<br>3) Turbocharge your NA motor with all the ensuing benefits and pitfalls of a high-compression turbomotor<p>Again, depending on your skill level, you can accomplish the above for anywhere from $300 (junkyard diving, duct tape, wing & a prayer) to over $5000 (very nice 7/9 turbo car with low miles.)<br> <br>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
I have a 91 740. Its a turbo though. <br>If its too slow for you I'd suggest getting a turbo car. <br>I have done many mods to mine, 15G turbo from an 850, a Getrag transmission from a BMW M3, 3" exhaust, intake, and soon to add a programable EMS.<p>I think in total I have 3K into the car if I added it up.<p>Sure turbo's die, but I have NEVER seen one costing 1500 bucks. I bought a 89 740 with 196K Km on it, the owners never changed the oil, turbo died. They were quoted 1500 for the turbo and 1500 for the install (hack job shop). I bought a 75 dollar used turbo and spent an hour on the side of the road putting it in. Rebuilding turbos is just as good as buying a new turbo. Rebuilds for Garrets you can buy on e-bay for 125 bucks so long as your 'pellers are fine. Mitsu's can be rebuilt (along with modifications) for 500 at a shop.<br>You could also if need be, go out and buy a brand new T3/T4 turbo for 650USD from a reputable source (they will also do stock Volvo turbo's for cheaper than that).<p>I have spending money monthly on payments. So I am happy with my old 740, and the money I put into it every so often. <p>I must admit that I do have an 850 as a daily driver.<p>Oh and on another turbo related note, we have a customer at work who has a 1million km warrenty on his '04 V70R. He is at 270Km and has had no problems with the turbo. And he does NOT drive the car gently.<p>Jordan
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top