SwedeSpeed - Volvo Performance Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am going to be purchasing a 2 series Volvo for our au pair and would like to know what to look out for. What are the gotchas, if any, on these cars?<p>I really like the 2 series Volvo's but have only owned an 855 and a current P2 wagon. <p>Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
212 Posts
Re: What to look for when buying a 2 series (dgloveR)

Hello:<p>Here are some thngs, but it's by no means a comprehensive list- I'm sure others will have more to add.<p>1- As with any car, have it checked out by someone familiar with the make and model.<p>2- Pull the flame trap and check it for clogging. Poor flame trap maintenance can lead to oil leaks in the engine. Flame trap location varies by year; there's info on this site if you'll search.<p>3- Count on doing a new timing belt and front engine oil seals unless the seller can prove those things have been done recently.<p>4- Check to see that the heater/AC fan works quietly, on all settings. This is an expensive repair, unless you do it yourself, because the fan is really buried in the dash.<p>5- Look under the door sills and carpet for rust, especially up front.<p>6- Drive the car at NIGHT and check all lighting, inside and out. Look for lights that don't work, and lights that flicker or dim under certain conditions. These problems can be easy or difficult to fix.<p>7- Turn a hose on the windshield and check for leaks; a lot of cars with aftermarket replacement windshields leak.<p>8- Look very, very hard at the engine wiring for signs of deterioration, particularly if the car is pre-1990. You're looking for rotted and cracked insulation, and home-made wiring repairs. Also, look at the wiring at NIGHT with the engine running to see if you see arcing or sparks.<p>9- Check the transmission for leaks, particularly at the rear of the trans, where the tailshaft is. If there is a leak, count on doing a new tailshaft bearing and a new seal. DO NOT replace the seal alone; it is almost always bad because the bearing is bad. If you replace just the seal, it will begin leaking again in a very short time (like days). My FORMER mechanic did this, which is why he's no longer working on my car (long story).<p>10- Count on spending some money on repairs; cars of this age almost always have some issues. I would say that the majority of 200 series cars are now in the hands of second or third owners, which increases the possibility that you'll run into problems caused by deferred maintenance. Unless you're fortunate enough to find a one-owner car with a well-documented maintenance history, put aside a couple of grand for possible repairs. Better to have it and not need it, than to need it and not have it.<p>11- Don't fall in love with any Volvo you look at; consider it an appliance until it proves to be a good car. THEN you can fall in love with it. Be willing to walk away from any car you look at, no matter how great it looks. Good ones are out there; you just have to hang tough until you find one.<p>12- If a seller tells you that he has made performance modifications, either walk away or be very sure that you know what has been done and who has been working on the car. There are lots of great mods that don't hurt these cars. There are others that can cause trouble. Just know what you're getting into, and if you don't, don't buy the car.<p>As I said, others will have more to add...<br>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,953 Posts
Re: What to look for when buying a 2 series (dgloveR)

Good choice, Donald.<p>I like the 245 wagon for all-round utility and safety.<p>Your area is chock-full of candidates on the market - watch for rust and collision damage.<p>As you probably suspected, this subject (buying a 240) is well covered here at Swedespeed.<p>Below are some first-class sites with buyers' do's-n-dont's.<p>Keep us posted as you shop!<p>George Dill<p><A HREF="http://personal.ecu.edu/brownmi/volvo.htm" TARGET="_blank">http://personal.ecu.edu/brownmi/volvo.htm</A> (old but good)<p><A HREF="http://www.geocities.com/MotorCity/Downs/7458/hist240s.html" TARGET="_blank">http://www.geocities.com/Motor....html</A><p>This from England...<p><A HREF="http://www.volvoclub.org.uk/forum/archive/index.php/f-7.html" TARGET="_blank">http://www.volvoclub.org.uk/fo....html</A><p>More later.<p>George Dill<p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Make sure the overdrive works. Relays and solenoids like to fail.<p>Make sure the driveshaft support bearing/rubber is in good shape.<p>Check for leaks of all kinds.<p>Make sure the power steering system is in good working shape. <p>Look for air/vacuum leaks.<p>Check the rear area for rust. Wheel wells, trunk floor, hatch, etc. <p>The taillight wiring is problematic. <p>Check for leaks into teh back of the car. Around the rear windows and such.<p>Make sure radiator is sound, especially if its an original Volvo one.<br>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks to everyone for replying. The 2 series wagon are very cool in my opionion especially the turbo models.<p>I'm sure this won't be my last posting here in the 2 section.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
212 Posts
Re: (dgloveR)

Donald:<p>You're right- the wagons are really cool. If you're looking for one, you should bear in mind that wagons have a couple of specific- although not too serious- problems.<p>One is that the wiring for all the tailgate functions (high-mount brake light, washer/wiper, central locking system, and licence plate lights) runs through the roof, then through the tailgate hinges, then into the tailgate. Since the wires flex every time the tailgate is opened or closed, they eventually break, resulting in a loss of tailgate functions. Replacement wiring harnesses are available through IPD (www.ipdusa.com) and other vendors. Removal of the tailgate is necessary to install the harnesses; there is a left and a right harness. Homemade wiring repairs are not a great idea in this area, since regular automotive wiring can't take the flexing very long. Do the repair right, and you'll be much happier in the long run. Instructions are in this site's archives, and IPD includes instructions when they sell you harnesses.<p>Another is that the air-conditioning can be a little marginal on wagons, especially on dark-coloured cars. I'm in Georgia, and my 1988 245 is dark blue. It's okay if I'm driving alone or with one passenger, but a carful of people makes for warm riding, since there's also a lot of cubic footage to cool, as well as a lot of glass letting in the sun. There's not much to be done about this aside from good cooling system and A/C system maintenance, but choosing a light-coloured car would probably help a bit. It also helps if you park in shade whenever possible, so the system doesn't have to work so hard to cool things back down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Re: (dgloveR)

Make sure your 2 is well maintenenced. Most owners just run their 2's to the floor since they are so reliable. Then you end up buying that car and are left with their problems.<p>Vanguard
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top