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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)

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IMO the two core strengths of Volvo is safety and engine-making. Not a wide range of engines, but the engines they make are first rate. (There are a couple of other core strengths that are not as important.)
 

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I am not convinced on the longevity of a 2.0L Turbo making 300+ hp pushing around 5000lbs. Seems to me that to make the kind of power this motor makes it needs to run on boost (supercharger or turbo) for a large percentage of the duty cycle than a 3.0 T6 for example. You only get a certain level of torque from a motor of a fixed displacement. Small displacement motors can make power from lots of revs or forced induction. Lots of revs mean no power down low and that is fine for sports cars where you want revs. In big heavy cars that is not really very desirable. Now the supercharge can without a doubt solve that, but that the question is what hot compressed air does for reliability long term. Forced induction motors die not from power, but from detonation (which can be controlled with modern fuel systems) and from heat. Intercoolers reduce heat, but forced induction still run hotter than naturally aspirated motors. These motors might work out fine, but then again I am not one to want to be the first to pull 100k from one of these after pushing around a 5000lbs car.
 

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I am not convinced on the longevity of a 2.0L Turbo making 300+ hp pushing around 5000lbs. Seems to me that to make the kind of power this motor makes it needs to run on boost (supercharger or turbo) for a large percentage of the duty cycle than a 3.0 T6 for example. You only get a certain level of torque from a motor of a fixed displacement. Small displacement motors can make power from lots of revs or forced induction. Lots of revs mean no power down low and that is fine for sports cars where you want revs. In big heavy cars that is not really very desirable. Now the supercharge can without a doubt solve that, but that the question is what hot compressed air does for reliability long term. Forced induction motors die not from power, but from detonation (which can be controlled with modern fuel systems) and from heat. Intercoolers reduce heat, but forced induction still run hotter than naturally aspirated motors. These motors might work out fine, but then again I am not one to want to be the first to pull 100k from one of these after pushing around a 5000lbs car.
I think you are wrong; you will need to spend more time with any Volvo equipped w/ the Drive-E engines and you will change your mind very quickly. The XC90 T6 actually revs less than its predecessor whether equipped w/ the 3.2 inline-6 or 2.5T 5-cyl turbo engine. It is a very advanced powerplant, paired w/ an 8-speed transmission that helps propel it more powerfully and at lower RPM points than first generation XC90s did.

Volvo was not FORCED into making a hasty or bad or irrational decision by designing and going for the 2.0L engines. It was a conscious and well thought out decision and it is proving to be the right move.
 

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I think you are wrong; you will need to spend more time with any Volvo equipped w/ the Drive-E engines and you will change your mind very quickly. The XC90 T6 actually revs less than its predecessor whether equipped w/ the 3.2 inline-6 or 2.5T 5-cyl turbo engine. It is a very advanced powerplant, paired w/ an 8-speed transmission that helps propel it more powerfully and at lower RPM points than first generation XC90s did.

Volvo was not FORCED into making a hasty or bad or irrational decision by designing and going for the 2.0L engines. It was a conscious and well thought out decision and it is proving to be the right move.
I have nothing against T5 engine, but the T6 engine seems to be too much complicated (both turbo and supercharged). The engines of Volkswagen with such technical solution suffered from many longevity problems. The decision about 4-cylinder engines was forced - by emissions regulations and by national laws concerning cars with >2000 ccm. Furthermore, from Volvo point of view it was the best idea to invest in the engine family (both petrol and diesel are similar) which can be used in many models and offer fast return of investment.
 

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I think you are wrong; you will need to spend more time with any Volvo equipped w/ the Drive-E engines and you will change your mind very quickly. The XC90 T6 actually revs less than its predecessor whether equipped w/ the 3.2 inline-6 or 2.5T 5-cyl turbo engine. It is a very advanced powerplant, paired w/ an 8-speed transmission that helps propel it more powerfully and at lower RPM points than first generation XC90s did. ...
Read my post. small motors make power in 2 ways. Revs or Forced induction. Clearly the 2.0 T6 is forced induction. However that compressed air gets hot and hot air is bad for the engine. Few if any street car motors are design to run "On boost" 100% of the time. Race car motors. Sure. Big Diesel trucks. Sure.. Passenger car motors... This I believe is new. In the past most turbo or supercharged cars ran off boost 90% of the time. They used boost only to make peak power numbers so the duty cycle is different.
 

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Read my post. small motors make power in 2 ways. Revs or Forced induction. Clearly the 2.0 T6 is forced induction. However that compressed air gets hot and hot air is bad for the engine. Few if any street car motors are design to run "On boost" 100% of the time. Race car motors. Sure. Big Diesel trucks. Sure.. Passenger car motors... This I believe is new. In the past most turbo or supercharged cars ran off boost 90% of the time. They used boost only to make peak power numbers so the duty cycle is different.
Not true. modern turbocharged engine only run off boost at idle.
 

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I am not convinced on the longevity of a 2.0L Turbo making 300+ hp pushing around 5000lbs. Seems to me that to make the kind of power this motor makes it needs to run on boost (supercharger or turbo) for a large percentage of the duty cycle than a 3.0 T6 for example. You only get a certain level of torque from a motor of a fixed displacement. Small displacement motors can make power from lots of revs or forced induction. Lots of revs mean no power down low and that is fine for sports cars where you want revs. In big heavy cars that is not really very desirable. Now the supercharge can without a doubt solve that, but that the question is what hot compressed air does for reliability long term. Forced induction motors die not from power, but from detonation (which can be controlled with modern fuel systems) and from heat. Intercoolers reduce heat, but forced induction still run hotter than naturally aspirated motors. These motors might work out fine, but then again I am not one to want to be the first to pull 100k from one of these after pushing around a 5000lbs car.
I've always wondered about piston face temperatures as displacement drops and more power/liter is being produced. It's my understanding they're getting way hotter. But like you say, time will tell. Let the first adopters find the bugs. And then we'll see if all those plastic induction parts hold up from the heat and time of repetitive hot/cold cycles as the years go by.

Ooh, but did you notice the VM Motori L630 3.0l V6 diesel in the Ram 1500 made the list twice, including last year? Gets 30 mpg highway in a full-sized pickup, which is not shabby. I'll probably have to replace my '92 F150 (only 39,200 miles) one of these days and that might just fit the ticket nicely. Will double my mpg from 15 to 30. And here in California diesel is cheaper than regular if you know where to look.
 

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I am not convinced on the longevity of a 2.0L Turbo making 300+ hp pushing around 5000lbs. Seems to me that to make the kind of power this motor makes it needs to run on boost (supercharger or turbo) for a large percentage of the duty cycle than a 3.0 T6 for example. You only get a certain level of torque from a motor of a fixed displacement. Small displacement motors can make power from lots of revs or forced induction. Lots of revs mean no power down low and that is fine for sports cars where you want revs. In big heavy cars that is not really very desirable. Now the supercharge can without a doubt solve that, but that the question is what hot compressed air does for reliability long term. Forced induction motors die not from power, but from detonation (which can be controlled with modern fuel systems) and from heat. Intercoolers reduce heat, but forced induction still run hotter than naturally aspirated motors. These motors might work out fine, but then again I am not one to want to be the first to pull 100k from one of these after pushing around a 5000lbs car.
I HOPE that you are wrong. It's too early to tell at this point.
 

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The first Volvo engine, made in 1927, was also a 2.0L 4-cyl. It made 28 HP. Technology marches on. I'm sure people in that day would doubt that a 2.0L 4-cyl making, say, 80 HP would run the risk of exploding, or something. :)
 
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