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I have had several Volvo cars, curently a 99s70 awd. All have had the similar problem. after bout 20000km. I find there is far too much free-play on the brake pedal, and also toomuch pressure needed to apply. The dealer claims this is normal.
Has anyone else found this to be a problem?
 

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quote:

Originally posted by deverous:
I have had several Volvo cars, curently a 99s70 awd. All have had the similar problem. after bout 20000km. I find there is far too much free-play on the brake pedal, and also toomuch pressure needed to apply. The dealer claims this is normal.
Has anyone else found this to be a problem?
Perhaps there is some air in the system???

Yannis
 

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Perhaps the brake lines themself stretch over time and use. Steel brading is the only way to prevent this.
Worn calipers also cause more pedal travel in my experience. The brake cylinder has to go farther into its stoke for full engagement.
 

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quote:

Originally posted by Spearzy:
Worn calipers also cause more pedal travel in my experience. The brake cylinder has to go farther into its stoke for full engagement.
You mean pads, right? When the pads wear down, the piston has to push out farther.
 

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quote:

Originally posted by deverous:
I find there is far too much free-play on the brake pedal, and also toomuch pressure needed to apply. The dealer claims this is normal.
If you have to push the pedal down farther than normal, there are a few possible causes that I can think of. Air in the lines will give a mushy pedal that will go down farther than normal. A leak in the system can give a low pedal. Worn pads might yield a slight change in pedal position, but these all seem unlikely in a "new" car with only 12,400 miles/20,000km.

Excessive pedal pressure needed when stopping could also be caused by air in the lines. The air compresses, so it doesn't transmit all of the pedal effort into hydraulic force on the pads. The pads can also glaze, which often happens when they get overheated. A glazed pad becomes much less effective in stopping, but I don't know much about this and have never experienced it.

Your situation may just be normal as the brakes wear, but there are potential problems that could be present as well.
 
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