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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does it drive anybody here crazy that Volvo offers a lot more models and options in other countries than the U.S.?

I think the V40 and V60 would sell very well in the U.S. but per Volvo's email to me, they have no intention to bring these cars here and then talked about how they're doing electric C30s and biodiesel cars. I asked if they'd be offered here and the reply was "no." So why tell me about it? They know I live in the U.S.

And can somebody explain to me why Volvo does limits certain models here? I know some are slow sellers but cutting off the supply completely? Better a few sales than none right? I'm seriously curious on this.
 

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The cost of preparing a vehicle line for import is very expensive for a manufactuer. They (the manufacturer) have to make sure the vehicle passes regulations imposed by the federal government. The same is for US Automakers that wish to sell their products in foreign countries. Most automakers only export vehicles worldwide that will turn a profit for them (Volvo included). Now I agree with you, the North American market does get shortchanged when it comes to vehicles available at your local dealer. It's not simply the sale of the vehicle but also providing parts and service nationwide which can and does it very expensive. Setting up and maintaining a infrastructure to support "a few sales here and there" is not cost effective for any company.

Bottom line is, most European automakers only export their high volume vehicle lines. Think of it this way, right now there is a guy in Europe asking the same exact question about an Ford Mustang or Chevrolet Camero.
 

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This was discussed thoroughly more than once on this forum. The simplest answer is that US auto market is significantly different from most other world markets:

1. The dealer has to keep an inventory on the lot, while in most other countries people pre-order. Volvo has to provide significant incentives to the dealers to support that inventory, thus - less return on investment, lower profit margins
2. The US market is the most competitive market price-wise...again, lower profit margin that makes low volume models non-feasible. The current market wisdom is that the wagons will NOT sell well in US, while the SUV is a better fit for the US.
3. USD sucks...that makes already low profits even lower or non-existent...again, is not conducive to the low-volume models.
4. Cost of federalization that applies to any combination of body-style/engine...low volume models might not recuperate this cost.
5. A necessity to maintain broader spare parts inventory...

So, here is just a few considerations...I am sure that more knowledgeable people can add a few more...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for elaborating. It's too bad. Still kills me that they have some really appealing models that are not available. Plus, somebody should tell them to redesign the XC90 and S80 because their age is really starting to show.
 

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Does it drive anybody here crazy that Volvo offers a lot more models and options in other countries than the U.S.?

I think the V40 and V60 would sell very well in the U.S. but per Volvo's email to me, they have no intention to bring these cars here and then talked about how they're doing electric C30s and biodiesel cars. I asked if they'd be offered here and the reply was "no." So why tell me about it? They know I live in the U.S.

And can somebody explain to me why Volvo does limits certain models here? I know some are slow sellers but cutting off the supply completely? Better a few sales than none right? I'm seriously curious on this.
The US has its own set of specifications, certifications, and testing requirements. To bring a vehicle in that has a low sales volume, those costs have to be spread over a small number causing the price on those models to jump. That can make them unsellable (over priced). The alternative is to lose money on each vehicle which is not a good way of staying in business.

In addition, there are spare parts inventory, sales brochure, sales-critter training, and mechanic training that would be required.

A simple example is the speed limiter in the S60: for US, it is 130MPH. If there is no requirement for that in Europe, the US model requires a different software load. Another set of programmers to maintain it, test plans to include it, and making sure the US software load goes on a US car -- not the European load, and certainly not the US load on a European car.
 
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