SwedeSpeed - Volvo Performance Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,080 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While doing a compression test a couple of weekends back I noticed that the top and threads of the number 3 spark plug were covered in fresh oil. My PCV system is nearly brand new as is my oil filler cap gasket and I do not put oil in my car without using a funnel. My guess is that a new valve cover gasket is in order. I've ordered a tube from Tasca but now I'm wondering if there's anything else I should replace while I'm at it. Anything come to mind?


How long will this job probably take?
 

·
Registered
2005 V70R, Midnight Blue, M66
Joined
·
2,124 Posts
I know of no such gasket.
Based on location I would suspect PCV hose connection.
If it were closer to cyl. 1 I would suspect cam seals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,080 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I know of no such gasket.
Based on location I would suspect PCV hose connection.
If it were closer to cyl. 1 I would suspect cam seals.
In these cars, it's a liquid gasket. I've ordered a tube.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,228 Posts
In these cars, it's a liquid gasket. I've ordered a tube.
make sure you order cam locking tool as well...and get a small roller to apply your newly acquired chemical gasket by rolling it on BOTH sides" head and top cover"...but the odds of it leaking there are slim to none...unless it was taken off by someone before and reinstalled incorrectly which I have seen before. Let us know how it went and good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,080 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
make sure you order cam locking tool as well...and get a small roller to apply your newly acquired chemical gasket by rolling it on BOTH sides" head and top cover"...but the odds of it leaking there are slim to none...unless it was taken off by someone before and reinstalled incorrectly which I have seen before. Let us know how it went and good luck.
Will do. Thanks. I would agree if I hadn't seen the oil on the threads and had a freshly overhauled PCV system. If it was a side effect of my previously clogged PCV, my guess is that the leak would have been external so I'm not sure what happened here.

So that I will know the next time, between what two surfaces is this chemical gasket applied?
It's applied between the valve cover and the head. They're labelled "2" in the diagram.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,409 Posts
Volvo procedure is to apply to one side, the side with no dowels which is the top. The anaerobic sealer is a thin film sealant and more is not better. More is just more to squeeze outside and inside the head when the bolts are tightened. To the inside is possibly into the tappet oiling holes and into cam journals.
Cleaning the old stuff off and assuring the two surfaces are free from any oil residue is critical. DO not use anything that gouges as the grooves left from abusive cleaning will not let the sealant cure. The cleaning process is best done with gasket remover chemical readily available at auto stores. Volvo uses a paint on liquid of that chemical. The aerosol version at auto stores can be sprayed into a vessel and also painted on to areas where aerosol may be too much. A brass brush will get the old sealant off easily once the chemical has dissolved the sealant for 10 or so minutes.
The reason Volvo and others used this type sealant is to not only seal but to glue the two pieces together for rigidity. When it doesn't get the accelerant action of the copper in the aluminum alloy the bond and the curing is less than intended.
It is applied like a single coat of house paint. When the close-spaced bolts are torqued the excess sealant is displaced outward. Any that oozes out is pure waste as it stays liquid unless it is somewhere where air is excluded like cam journals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,080 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I mentioned using the funnel, but make sure it's not the cause of the simple oil fill before taking the engine apart. Maybe previous owner was not as careful?
Got it. I will double check.

Volvo procedure is to apply to one side, the side with no dowels which is the top. The anaerobic sealer is a thin film sealant and more is not better. More is just more to squeeze outside and inside the head when the bolts are tightened. To the inside is possibly into the tappet oiling holes and into cam journals.
Cleaning the old stuff off and assuring the two surfaces are free from any oil residue is critical. DO not use anything that gouges as the grooves left from abusive cleaning will not let the sealant cure. The cleaning process is best done with gasket remover chemical readily available at auto stores. Volvo uses a paint on liquid of that chemical. The aerosol version at auto stores can be sprayed into a vessel and also painted on to areas where aerosol may be too much. A brass brush will get the old sealant off easily once the chemical has dissolved the sealant for 10 or so minutes.
The reason Volvo and others used this type sealant is to not only seal but to glue the two pieces together for rigidity. When it doesn't get the accelerant action of the copper in the aluminum alloy the bond and the curing is less than intended.
It is applied like a single coat of house paint. When the close-spaced bolts are torqued the excess sealant is displaced outward. Any that oozes out is pure waste as it stays liquid unless it is somewhere where air is excluded like cam journals.
Many thanks for the info. I will keep this in mind if I have to dive in this weekend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,075 Posts
matt, i would double check, triple check and then get three other opinions to back it up then maybe proceed to redo the gasket.

It is not fun to do, it is time consuming, did i say its not fun. for a first timer this is a good 8 hour job. Not a hard job, you also need to do it right or you can mess up your engine pretty good.

I have done this job when i did a head gasket on a project car last year.

Dont recommend doing it at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,228 Posts
Will do. Thanks. I would agree if I hadn't seen the oil on the threads and had a freshly overhauled PCV system. If it was a side effect of my previously clogged PCV, my guess is that the leak would have been external so I'm not sure what happened here.
also ,you will need five O ring rubber gaskets as well they go in-between the cover and head right around each of the spark-plugs,and new front and rear cam seals unless you have low miles then you could reuse them if you're closet to 100k mine as well change the timing belt and mark it up really well including on your crank...and it'll take you all day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
942 Posts
I too have a leaking Cam Cover...3 bolts around #2 Plug stripped, they just turn in place.
Valley is oil filled.

Oil cap gasket is fine, PCV & hose are new 2 months back.

The oil leak is from stripped cover bolts.

I gather the whole cover gets removed and new pink gasket paste is applied.

I have to repair the stripped threads, will insert heli-coils while cover is off.
And new spark plug o-rings and Cam seals.

Question:
Do the Camshafts need to be locked down at the non-timing belt end?
Seems to me they will try to jump out of the motor with cover off...

Tempted to have my local Shop handle this one...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
758 Posts
Yes, you need to lock the cams with a special cam locking tool and another one to push the cover back on, against the force of the valve springs.
I bought this set of cam look tools on eBay for $63.
I just did mine twice. I had forgotten to turn the crankshaft to the correct position the first time. So I took the cover off again to turn the crankshaft in the correct position, and put it back on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
942 Posts
Anyone know how deep the threads go into the lower half of the cam box? I want to order the correct length Heli-coils...
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top