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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello, The car in question is my mom's 2008 xc70 3.2 awd. Yesterday she told me she got a ("Engine is hot, stop engine") message on the dash while in stop and go traffic. She told me that it did not overheat or steam/smoke.
I was able to look the car over late last evening in the dark. I discovered the coolant to be very dirty and decided (with not much time left in my day) to pump out some of the ugly coolant and add some fresh Blue coolant.
Today the car was used locally and didn't have any further issues, I was told. This evening I had a bit more time to go look at her car again and removed the air box to investigate further after finding some sludge.

Can you guys help me identify this mess? Is this a leaking water pump?


The bottle on the left is what I pumped out, and added exactly the same of the new coolant on the right.
I suppose at that late hour of the day my thought process was that since she's only had this car since October,
maybe the existing brown coolant was a bad mixture of coolants and topped off with water by the previous owner.
Upon inspection today, I see that there's a bigger issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)

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That's it. No need to replace. Volvo makes a reseal kit for about $80. You do need to remove it to reseal it but that isn't hard.

10mm for the clamp holding the wiring. Then 2 10mms holding a bracket under there. Then either two 10mms for the other bracket you'll see or 1 10mm and 1 13mm. Remove the front battery box cover. Disconnect the vacuum hose from the pump. Remove 2 10mms holding the pump on.

The whole reseal takes me about 15 minutes including cleaning up the oil. But I've done dozens of them. An average DIYer should have to problem getting it done in an hour.

This isn't related to the warning message your mom got. That's likely a thermostat. The plastic housing breaks internally. You can't see it until it's removed, so I'd recommend buying one and being ready to replace it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
This isn't related to the warning message your mom got. That's likely a thermostat.
This was going to be my next question, thank you for confirming.
I'll probably do the vacuum pump gasket replacement myself but may send the car to our mechanic for the thermostat if the procedure is more complicated than I have time or experience for.
 

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If the water pump isn't leaking, I doubt it is your problem. I've seen plenty of those thermostats come apart.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If the water pump isn't leaking, I doubt it is your problem. I've seen plenty of those thermostats come apart.
sorry, i just edited my last reply. I mistakenly wrote wp when you had mentioned Ts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So I went to FCP Euro this morning for parts. They are about 15 mins from my house.
Got home and so far I've gotten the vacuum pump out, replaced the gaskets and reinstalled.
I picked up a new thermostat housing, my question is, do I need to remove the upper intake manifold?
It looks quite challenging otherwise. Thanks for any advice.

 

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Hello Sven, it looks to me that you have 2 separate issues, a coolant leak and a mix of coolant and oil. I would suggest to investigate them separately.

However, I would like to ask in this thread about my oil leak too. It's a MY09 3.2 XC70.

Last year I already serviced the vacuum pump by replacing the orings, but the bottom of the engine is still wet of oil.

Before starting to carefully clean it and check the source, does anyone have any hint on where to check?

 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
I do them without removing the intake
Could you elaborate on this? The more I look at the engine bay I just can't see how to get around everything in order to remove and install the thermostat properly.
In comparison to my 2010 xc90 which looks like this job would be much easier, the xc70 bay seems very tight. But as I looked over the manifold, I can see why leaving it in place if possible is a better choice.



I had seen this video before making this thread but the problem I found is that the car in the video is an xc90 which has so much more room in the bay to work.


Before starting to carefully clean it and check the source, does anyone have any hint on where to check?
hopefully someone might have an answer for you, I'm totally new to volvo (but not doing driveway mechanics, I spent a lot of years with mk3 volkswagens).
this is my 1998 Vr6 which I've had over 15 years. Garaged summer car. North American spec car converted to European bumpers and lighting. The list of mods on this car is long and for another forum.
 

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you just need to unhook the power steering reservoir and move it, like when you're doing an oil change. You'll have basically the same room as an XC90 at that point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Hi guys, an update:
I found the time to tackle the thermostat replacement. With little room to work, the bottom 2 of the 4 Torx bolts are a challenge.
I wish I could say that there was similar room to an xc90 with the power steering reservoir moved, and that leaving the manifold on was easier.
I found neither to be the case personally, but at the end of the day, the job is completed and the car runs fine so far.

I found the thermostat to be broken internally as was suggested by Tech.
In fact, as soon as I removed it from the block, the spring popped out.
I had to fish the rectangular bracket and some pieces of broken plastic from the T-stat out of the port all the while praying they didn't fall in.

After what I was certain was a tight fit between the upper coolant hose and T-stat, I began filling the expansion tank and quickly found a tiny trickle of coolant escaping through the slit on the connector for the clip.
At first I thought the internal O ring was bad, but once the old hose was completely removed from the car I discovered the edge of the rubber hose inside the connector to be deteriorated.
Bad rubber hose end, worn O ring, either or... a new hose is on the car now and hardly any new coolant was lost swapping hoses. :)


All parts were purchased from FCP Euro. I can say that if any of these lifetime warrantied parts need to be replaced again, I'll probably remove the intake manifold if there is a next time.
Below pictured are the worn parts removed from the car.
 
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