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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So I am sure that everyone has done everything in the sticky section already, but I figured for those of you stillout there turning your wrench yourself, here's a guide to changing out a tight to reach area for the turbo oil feed line on the block side - If you're unlucky like me, some ahole torqued it to over 100ftlbs so when you removed it to replace the leaking copper crush gaskets, it took the threads out with it so it has to be taken to the dealership now to be fixed. On a side note does anyone know how much this will probably run me?

So to do this job you'll need:
19mm socket
10mm socket
T-25 torx bit
8" extension
Ratchets to fit your sockets

So I developed a leak at the block side turbo oil feed line. It was enough to have a silver dollar sized puddle on the garage floor every time I parked it. I figured i would tackle this job today before the winter time hit full force with the snow and whatnot.

First you should remove the wheel, it will give you plenty of room. I don't think you need me to show you how to do that. - it takes a 19mm socket to undo the lugnuts.

Then remove the fenderwell, there are 2x 10mm bolts at the back of the fenderwell and 7x T25 screws around the edge. Remove those and it'll look like this:


So from here you can take a look inside and from the bottom and see the source of the oil leak:



Ok so for the fun part (and for me the expensive part)
Assemble your ratchet


Begin to insert your ratchet into the space available:


Stick it further in:


And viola! We have contact:


Now unbolt it and there will be two copper crush washers, one on each side of the oil feed tube:
This is what the ones I took off looked like:


This is the part that is actually supposed to be on there in comparison to the old ones:


The thicker copper crush gasket is actually for the turbocharger coolant lines. The thinner one is for the oil line. Whoever fixed this used a thicker one, which necessarily aint a bad thing, but the excessive amount of force he put into it on reassembly has now cost me much more than initially thought. Just reverse the process for assembly. Start the car to ensure there is not a leak anymore and viola you're good to go!

The copper crush washers you need is number 15, but why the diagram only shows one is beyond me, as you'll need two, one for each side to ensure a good seal, part #947621. if you want the thicker coolant line crush washers, they are part #969011
 

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Out of curiosity, why does it require a trip to the dealer? What exactly happened to the threads? Can you get a picture of it by chance?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Out of curiosity, why does it require a trip to the dealer? What exactly happened to the threads? Can you get a picture of it by chance?
Well I could get a picture of it, but laying in ice and snow on the roadway and jacking the car up again on ice doesn't sound like the safest plan for me haha.

So basically, when you take a steel bolt and tighten it into an aluminum block, and you overtighten it, add heat to that pressure, and the threads on the block's hole will actually adhere to the steel bolt, it's the same process that causes siezed bolts in your oil pan drain plug. If you apply enough force, like I did (after I hit 100ftlbs on the torque wrench I knew it was either siezed or was just too tight), the threads on the block that were seized to the bolt detached from their walls in the passageway and came out with the bolt. Just like a small metal spiral.

It requires a trip to the dealer, because I can't get a good view on the hole and work on the hole will require the subframe dropped and the right front axle removed. Depending on how much of the thread in the hole came out, it may be able to be retapped for a bigger bolt, it may be able to have a helicoil installed and have the same bolt put back in it, or if they say nothing can be done, I'll need a whole new lower block put in there. I want to take it to the dealer because I'm fairly sure they won't overcrank it like the shop that originally tried to fix it. The crush washer next to the bolt was squished about 2/3's of it's overall width, which was wayyyy too much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
So just got a call from the dealership, they need to remove some mounts, the axle, and drop the engine a few inches to see if it can be helicoiled, charged 3 hours of labor. If not they said it'll need a new engine, and that's not something they do there. Yayyyy looks like I'm buying myself an engine crane and doing the work myself woohoo. Does anyone know a good sticky for taking the engine out or a good sticky for a clutch replacement (since it'll be the same job time anyways)?

As an alternative, if it can't be helicoiled, I asked them if it could be drilled out and rethreaded for a 3/8" NPT connection, which would mean I could just hook a hosebarb up to it and chop the round end off the oil supply line, and hook up a rubber hose connector and whamo, good to go. They said they don't know if a "coolant jacket" is in the way or not, but will know by tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Alrighty just got a call from the dealership. That one stripped bolt apparently warrants an entirely new engine. The dealership said that bolt hole in the block comes helicoiled from the factory. The dealership said it cannot be drilled and replaced, and cannot be drilled and retapped for a larger connector.

Well, that's just dandy, if anyone has this happen to them, it might cost you big time. Dealer is quoting me $5600 installed for a new engine from the factory. Great.
 

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I would call around your area and ask some other shops about repairing it. Dealers are notoriously lazy and if it isn't some strait up service work they would just rather not do that.
Just yesterday I had a E500 211 Mercedes at the shop and rear camber was out of spec. Camber arms were ok. Found a rear subframe bolt was broken and the air suspension was jacking the body off the rear axle carrier. Where am I going with this? This would be like the dealer saying "You need a new car" Well, I dropped the rear axle carrier and drilled out and extracted the broken bolt. Yes it took some time, some fire, metal shavings down my armpit but in the end, I win. BTW, I always win because I'm a Technician and not a "Parts Replacer" like so many so called "Techs" today. See if you can find a knowledgeable Shop with actual Techs and you CAN get that repaired. Good luck
 

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This dealer is making me angry. Absolutely no regard for their customer, they just want the high-dollar, high profit solution. Eff them. Get that car towed to the nearest machine shop and ask them to take care of it if you can't do it yourself.
 

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This dealer is making me angry. Absolutely no regard for their customer, they just want the high-dollar, high profit solution. Eff them. Get that car towed to the nearest machine shop and ask them to take care of it if you can't do it yourself.
Don't get too bent out of shape here. This is a nightmare problem for ANY shop. There is no way you can give a firm estimate which is what's required by law in most states. They could easily spend a full day on this and not get anywhere. It CAN be repaired but it's EXTREMELY difficult to do given the space constraints. This may require removal of the engine to get access & then a trip to a specialized machine shop. Even then you have the issue of drilling, welding, whatever, on an oil passageway. Can you GUARANTEE there will be no tiny metal shaving left that then heads right for the turbo? You would want the block disassembled so you could clean the passages properly. It's just one of those awful problems that sometimes occur. Maybe Avenger needs his car back pronto, we just don't know. If he needs his car back quickly with a minimum of fuss he'll need to go the new/used motor route. He can then fix the current one at his leisure by whatever means works & sell it. Or perhaps buy a beater & spend all Winter trying to fix his S40.
 

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I'm sure there is a way to do it...there's no crack in the block, it's just a stripped bolt hole. I would seriously contact a machine shop and find out what you may be able to get done. I've never heard of something that crazy. "There's no threads in the hole....SCRAP THE MOTOR!!!"
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
I'm sure there is a way to do it...there's no crack in the block, it's just a stripped bolt hole. I would seriously contact a machine shop and find out what you may be able to get done. I've never heard of something that crazy. "There's no threads in the hole....SCRAP THE MOTOR!!!"
So, I thought of a way to do it, and it's not too hard, but would require a complete removal and disassembly of the engine like you said. That would be the only way to guarantee there would be no metal shavings left over.

If you're like me, then you examined everything you could when you got the car and know as much as you can about it. The only way I can see that's easy, is to yank the whole engine, remove the oil pan, remove the head, undo the bolts cinching the two halves of the crankcase together, and then roll it over on a blanket and remove the bottom half (with the stripped hole) then send it to a machine shop to get filled and redrilled/threaded. Considering it's an oil passageway we cannot just drop the oil pan and get to it from the inside.

In the end, at a machine shop, getting this done would be in the neighbourhood of about $1-2k when all was said and done between shipping and work needed if I am looking at this problem correctly.

The way I see it, I need this car for the next 3-5 years. And then it'll become a hobby car (as I am totally shocked what they said was correct, it's a fireball in a plain brown wrapper). I found a completely torn down and rebuilt used engine 39k on it with a 5 year unlimited mile warranty for $3k, I can install it myself and have a 3 year warranty or have a shop do it and get the 5 year. I can buy a new balanced cartridge for the extra turbo assembly I have for about $220-250 and put that in myself. I figured while it's out I'll get a new clutch (definitely) ($250) and flywheel(if needed) and get the slave/masters replaced and then couple that with the engine, and have a shop put it in for about $1400-1800 in labor, and then take the old engine home and strip it for parts. Still comes out to about $600 cheaper than buying an engine from the dealership would be and I get to keep the old engine.

Thoughts?
 

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^ go for it then. buy the new engine and yeah, maybe just have the shop install so you can get the better warranty. Im not sure how useful all the engine parts will be to keep around, but if you have the space, and maybe some time to sell it all off, then it cant hurt.
Best of luck to you whatever happens, hopefully it doesnt turn into too much of a pain.
 

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If you do the latest idea, you might as well build the "side motor" and be the first to make over 500hp to the wheels. Sleeve it so you can go big on the pistons, make as much relatively reliable power from it that you can squeeze out.

It's up to you really. It's your wallet, and you know what you can and can't afford. Me personally, I'd find a machine shop that would guarantee their work in tapping and evacuating all the shavings. I'm 99% sure that the guy I normally use would do it, and he's not outrageously prices. But again - your car, your wallet, your decision.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
If you do the latest idea, you might as well build the "side motor" and be the first to make over 500hp to the wheels. Sleeve it so you can go big on the pistons, make as much relatively reliable power from it that you can squeeze out.

It's up to you really. It's your wallet, and you know what you can and can't afford. Me personally, I'd find a machine shop that would guarantee their work in tapping and evacuating all the shavings. I'm 99% sure that the guy I normally use would do it, and he's not outrageously prices. But again - your car, your wallet, your decision.
500hp? No one has hit that before? What's the record so far for street legal?
 

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I don't know that nobody has hit it yet, that was just a guess. The majority of people that have wanted to get big numbers are discouraged by the fact the the t5 cylinder walls are thin, and I haven't seen that anyone has sleeved our motor yet. Could be someone somewhere, but I'm sure their praises would be sung in all the "want more power" threads.

When I replaced my motor a few years ago, I was going to do it but found that my block was cracked, so I just scrapped it. If you do it, be prepared for negativity from most of these guys until it's done and proven. Personally, I'd love to see it done, and if I had time and a budget that allowed, I'd buy a parts car to play with.
 

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Photobucket links in OP are broken. Avenger09123 - any chance you are still around and willing to fix? About to take this on this weekend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Photobucket links in OP are broken. Avenger09123 - any chance you are still around and willing to fix? About to take this on this weekend.
Lemme look and see if I have them around here...
 
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