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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a basket case '73 ES that's pretty well lost due to rust. I am trying to start it to assess the engine. I have the fuel lines going into a clean 5 gal can with fresh gas. I verified gas is getting to the fuel rail and returning to the 5 gal can. The engine fires when hit with ether, but that's it. Do I need to clean the injectors or be a little more patient to see if they'll come back from a comatose state?

I'm guessing my next step would be to pull each injector and see if it's shooting gas.

Any thoughts are welcome....

Dan
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Never mind. Health care isn't the only profession where you need patience. We ran fine for 20 minutes or so. I'm curious to see what a compression test reveals tomorrow.

Too bad the car is a general loss though. I'm hoping to find a shell in decent shape to use as my project base. All the trim and glass on this car is in good shape and prime for being a donor.
 

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Congratulations on getting her going again.

I just picked up a similar 73 project car (sitting for 10+ years without use) but haven't really done anything with it yet.

I never would have thought of running lines to/from a gas can. What else did you do besides that to fire her up?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks. I pulled the return line from the fuel rail and let the pump run until I had gas coming out of the rail. A bit of ether was the only other thing I did. I probably should have put some oil soak in the cylinders for a while though to get things pre-lubed.

I decided, before doing a compression check, to let it run for a little bit. We managed ~15 minutes until the radiator overflow tube popped. I guess it's ok at 175, 168, 168, 158 (maybe a little off on this one).

I had to break out the leaf blower to blow all the rust off the driveway when I was done....
 

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thanks; inspirational. I will be moving mine from the barn into the garage and may try to fire her up before I do so.
 

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I had recently done a compression test in a 73, and had much less compression than what you did. But I am not sure if in my case the car was fully warmed up, and also I don't think I had removed all spark plugs. How did you get such high pressure? Did you take all plugs out and spun it around with fully hot engine?

I am curious if in my case I have a worn out engine. I had attributed the pow pressure (100-110 psi) to the low compression ratio of the 73 along with some likely leakage in my gauge (could your engine be from a 71 with higher compression ratio?). My main purpose for the test was to test the possibility of a bad head gasket, and I think now that this was not the case with this car (I would have gotten much less in one of the cylinders).

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Didenpx: I'm, not sure what others think, but it might be worthwhile to put some oil soak in the cylinders for a week or two before trying to get it running.

Dimitri: I had my engine up to full warm and pulled all plugs. I spun the engine around for 4 or 5 seconds when checking the compression. I don't know too much of the history for this car. I doubt the engine has been changed.

Now I need to figure out what the drivetrain is worth and get the engine, trans (4spd w/OD), and maybe rear posted to the classified section.
 

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Didenpx: I'm, not sure what others think, but it might be worthwhile to put some oil soak in the cylinders for a week or two before trying to get it running.

Good suggestion; I will put some in there this week and use a breaker bar to turn the engine over after it sits for a while
 

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If you can run the engine with some very high detergent oil (maybe some ATF) in it to get the gunk cleaned out you might get better compression results. The rings can get stuck to the pistons, etc and everything needs to be freed up.
 

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Warlus, you are probably right about that. At that time the engine was also smoking some, indicating oil control rings sticking. The engine has ran more since then, and that is no longer the case, so there may be already some better movement of the piston rings and may be better compression. Probably STP oil treatment is the best way to add a bunch of detergent additives. Also, if I had all plugs removed and fully hot engine, I would probably get a bit more "squeeze" out of it.
 

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Hey dethomson I mix in fuel injector cleaner in with the premium gas at the start of the car season and then I use an octane booster especially when driving in and around town. Highway cruising well just premium. All this keeps everything nice a smooth :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
How do I tell what engine is in my car? I heard you need to look at the numbers on the left hand side of the block, but they are not decernable. I made out a 49 with a 1 1?????6 underneath. What are my options for finguring out what this is?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
For posterity sake, how did you come by that? Is the F variant a decent performer?
 

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For posterity sake, how did you come by that? Is the F variant a decent performer?
If the car has the original engine and is a USA model it has the B20F which for 1973 is the last engine for the 1800 line but the 1975 240 had a B20 in its first year.

The engine in your '73 ES was detuned from the '72 version for cleaner burning. The fuel injection system is an excellent setup but must be kept in perfect condition to operate properly.

Share the VIN/chassis info on your car and we'll find the original setup.

Thanks.

George Dill

http://www.v1800reg.org/pages/Type_desig.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
thanks George

here are the numbers from the engine compartment

Type: 1836353
S-6078

I'd love to put this thing down the street to see how it runs, but it's too much work. Unknown running gear and not having the front interior really puts a damper on that thought.
 

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The motor type number is a 6-digit number, usually with the first 2 or 4 digits cast and the rest stamped into a rectangular boss just to the left of the cast numbers. In any case the first two digits will be 49. There may be more than 4 additional digits following the 49 but the remainder are sequence or serial numbers. If you can give the 6-digit motor type number we can translate that into what cam, intake system, horsepower, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Oh, I was looking at the raised numbers below the 49. After the 49, it looks like 8232 is stamped into the rectangle boss.

Edit: I didn't notice any stamped numbers to the left of the 49
 

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Now I need to figure out what the drivetrain is worth and get the engine, trans (4spd w/OD), and maybe rear posted to the classified section.
The value is in the M41. They go for $200-500 in general, based on how much someone needs one, and how good yours is / how good you are at talking about it.

The motor......basically whatever the scrap rate it. Unless you find someone which really wants a B20F at that particular moment. B18's/B20's don't wear out (nearly not). Hence there is not much demand for replacement motors.

Rear differential, perhaps guys that race these? No clue on value though.

The scrap metal dealer may be the only one wanting to pick up your motor and rear axle, and pay you for them.
 
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