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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm changing the driver's side CV axle on my '06 V70R 6MT. I'm having a hard time getting the axle out of the transmission. I know there's a clip in there. I've tried wrapping a strap around the cup and the other end around a long lever but it's still not moving. I'm worried that 13 years in the northeast has seized things up. I've read about using chisels and wedges and such but I'm reluctant to start banging away. I've seen various tools that are meant for this job, usually a U-shape end that goes behind the cup and then either a long prybar or a slide hammer. I haven't found a place to buy the Volvo "jimmy tool 999 5462". Can anyone recommend one that works well?
 

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I borrowed an axle popper from AZ. Just slipped it between the cup and transmission and gave it a few taps and the axle popped free.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I’m 3 for 3 using a heavy sledge hammering away at the short end of a roofing pry bar. See video below.

https://youtu.be/pv4jL7F5Hm0


2002 V70XC, 2003 V40, 2004 S60, 2010 V70
Your video is the one that inspired me to take it out without even taking the brakes off, thanks! This method also gave me a chance to deal with the rust that's started in the strut mount. It was so easy I might just take the strut out once a year for maintenance!

I can't get that angle for a prybar. The casing on my manual transmission has ribs around where the axle comes out.


From below:
 

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have you tried the trick where you ratchet strap a wheel to the axle, then you swing the wheel out and away from the car? The wheel has enough mass that you don't need to swing it very fast, and you have some good momentum to yank the axle out.
 

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Your video is the one that inspired me to take it out without even taking the brakes off, thanks! This method also gave me a chance to deal with the rust that's started in the strut mount. It was so easy I might just take the strut out once a year for maintenance!

I can't get that angle for a prybar. The casing on my manual transmission has ribs around where the axle comes out.


From below:
Wow, very frustrating. Is there a way to fasten a giant u-clamp as close as possible to the transmission casing and using that as a leverage point? I’ve seen this work for the drivers side rear axle on AWD models where the same issue is at play.


2002 V70XC, 2003 V40, 2004 S60, 2010 V70
 

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Get a non-rubber coated 10lb barbell plate with a hole big enough to slip over the axle and a sturdy washer larger than the diameter of the plates hole. Push the barbell weight on the axle, then use the axle bolt to hold the washer in place. Pull out hard, acts as a slide hammer. One or two tries the axle pops out.
 

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2006 V70R M66, Titanium/Atacama
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Get a non-rubber coated 10lb barbell plate with a hole big enough to slip over the axle and a sturdy washer larger than the diameter of the plates hole. Push the barbell weight on the axle, then use the axle bolt to hold the washer in place. Pull out hard, acts as a slide hammer. One or two tries the axle pops out.
If I recall the axle construction properly, this will simply rip the inner CV joint apart - it's essentially pulling on the boot. Wouldn't recommend.

I pulled mine not too long ago to replace the axle seal (I have an M66 too), I had the car up on a quickjack lift so it was only about 24in up, and used a short pry bar between the joint housing and the transmission toward the cabin. I had the bar positioned well enough to hold in place, and while sitting on the floor next to the car, I kicked at the pry bar with the heel/arch of my foot and got it to pop.

I went through the same process as you, trying gradually increasing force waiting for it to pop, figuring at some point something's got to give. Ultimately, don't be gentle. All cards on the table, I was left with some marks in the outer transmission casting, but nothing functionally damaging.

Good luck!
 

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Your recall is wrong, hope you don`t think the boots hold the axles together. it`s not just pulling on the boot which would never pull the axle out and just try to pull a CV joint apart with out removing the joints circlip. Using your method If someone uses enough force and places the pry bar incorrectly, you`ll break the transmission casting and really have a mess. With one pry bar you're loading the axle sideways and that`s what causes so much force to be used. The axle is meant to be pulled straight out.
 

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I feel there's some misunderstanding on one side of this or the other, so let's back up and break it down.

Here's what I understood from this:
Get a non-rubber coated 10lb barbell plate with a hole big enough to slip over the axle and a sturdy washer larger than the diameter of the plates hole. Push the barbell weight on the axle, then use the axle bolt to hold the washer in place. Pull out hard, acts as a slide hammer. One or two tries the axle pops out.
Below is my driver side axle on the bench after I got it out. Let's assume it's still in the vehicle. What I understood from your proposal is to place a weight plate and washer on the end of the axle, with a bolt to retain (large and small black bars drawn on the right of the image). Then slide the weight plate like a slide hammer to pull the axle (solid red arrows). This is intended to pull through the entire axle assembly to inner CV joint and pull the axle free from the transmission.



Am I understanding your proposal correctly, or did I go wrong somewhere in here?

hope you don`t think the boots hold the axles together. it`s not just pulling on the boot which would never pull the axle out and just try to pull a CV joint apart with out removing the joints circlip.
Sort of do… the reason I don't think pulling with the hammer weight concept is a good idea is because the axles are designed for rotational load, and not axial load - despite the name. The inner CV joint is a sliding joint so that the shaft length can grow and shrink at the suspension moves up and down. If the inner joint is pulled at a slight angle, it comes right apart - the only thing holding that assembly together really is the boot unless it's straight on and then could be damaging to do so. Just like this: (my passenger axle with the boot off, inner CV joint, but same design on the driver's side)


There are certainly circlips in the axle assembly, but the clips are different in the inner vs outer joints. Here are photos of my cleaned and exploded layout of the joints on the passenger side axle - again, the joints in the axle are the same in the inner/outer positions, I've had both axles apart. The outer joint (at the wheel), there's a spring clip (red arrow) that holds the inner track for the bearings on the shaft, so it can just be knocked off - just like what's holding the entire axle assembly in the transmission, but tighter. Doing so will provide access to the entire shaft length so that new boots can be slid over. Also necessary to knock off if you want to get the whole joint apart because the shaft will prevent enough rotation to remove the ball bearings. Notice the bearing guide geometry as well, this joint can only flex.



The inner joint (at the transmission) uses a circlip to hold the inner track in the joint onto the shaft, and has to be removed with appropriate pliers (red arrow). Here the bearing guide geometry allows for both flex and slide to accommodate the length changes as suspension moves as noted earlier.



Using your method If someone uses enough force and places the pry bar incorrectly, you`ll break the transmission casting and really have a mess. With one pry bar you're loading the axle sideways and that`s what causes so much force to be used. The axle is meant to be pulled straight out.
I can't entirely agree to this. Yes, the prying action is slightly off axis, but not too far and everything in there is well lubricated with fluids so it'll slide. Prying out works well enough in a pinch to pop the clip free. Here's my transmission casting with the axle removed, some marks from leveraging off this feature (circled in red). It's a pretty big web of the casting, so it's strong. The proper Volvo 'jimmy tool' puts load on the inner area (circled in blue), which from the outside would appear to be weaker, and it does the job just fine.



Have I got this wrong?
 

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I think you have it right. All force should be applied to the cage, not the rest of axle.

Note that the early P2s had a different tripod joint than the later P2. Also, the later cages had stakes on them to prevent the joint from coming all the way out. I think if you applied enough force, you could probably separate them, but probably damaging the joint in the process.
 

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I feel there's some misunderstanding on one side of this or the other, so let's back up and break it down.

Here's what I understood from this:


Below is my driver side axle on the bench after I got it out. Let's assume it's still in the vehicle. What I understood from your proposal is to place a weight plate and washer on the end of the axle, with a bolt to retain (large and small black bars drawn on the right of the image). Then slide the weight plate like a slide hammer to pull the axle (solid red arrows). This is intended to pull through the entire axle assembly to inner CV joint and pull the axle free from the transmission.



Am I understanding your proposal correctly, or did I go wrong somewhere in here?



Sort of do… the reason I don't think pulling with the hammer weight concept is a good idea is because the axles are designed for rotational load, and not axial load - despite the name. The inner CV joint is a sliding joint so that the shaft length can grow and shrink at the suspension moves up and down. If the inner joint is pulled at a slight angle, it comes right apart - the only thing holding that assembly together really is the boot unless it's straight on and then could be damaging to do so. Just like this: (my passenger axle with the boot off, inner CV joint, but same design on the driver's side)


There are certainly circlips in the axle assembly, but the clips are different in the inner vs outer joints. Here are photos of my cleaned and exploded layout of the joints on the passenger side axle - again, the joints in the axle are the same in the inner/outer positions, I've had both axles apart. The outer joint (at the wheel), there's a spring clip (red arrow) that holds the inner track for the bearings on the shaft, so it can just be knocked off - just like what's holding the entire axle assembly in the transmission, but tighter. Doing so will provide access to the entire shaft length so that new boots can be slid over. Also necessary to knock off if you want to get the whole joint apart because the shaft will prevent enough rotation to remove the ball bearings. Notice the bearing guide geometry as well, this joint can only flex.



The inner joint (at the transmission) uses a circlip to hold the inner track in the joint onto the shaft, and has to be removed with appropriate pliers (red arrow). Here the bearing guide geometry allows for both flex and slide to accommodate the length changes as suspension moves as noted earlier.





I can't entirely agree to this. Yes, the prying action is slightly off axis, but not too far and everything in there is well lubricated with fluids so it'll slide. Prying out works well enough in a pinch to pop the clip free. Here's my transmission casting with the axle removed, some marks from leveraging off this feature (circled in red). It's a pretty big web of the casting, so it's strong. The proper Volvo 'jimmy tool' puts load on the inner area (circled in blue), which from the outside would appear to be weaker, and it does the job just fine.



Have I got this wrong?
I pried mine out with a 3ft prybar at the red spot you have circled. It came out super easy I was really confused why everyone has so much trouble with it.

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6013 using Tapatalk
 

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The way you first described, it had sounded to me like as if you thought the boot was holding the joint on the axle, mis-read on my part. I can understand your concerns about my thoughts on pulling the axle assembly out and I agree with you. In my experience the circlip on the axle slips out of the transmission much easier than the circlip holding the CV on the axle. But, my method could be problematic if the axle doesn`t come out of the transmission easily, so it`s not the best.

I think a prybar as you describe is better. My only add would be using 2 prybars on either side if there is room to even out the pull. Marks on the transmission case doesn`t matter at all. My only concern is someone using one prybar on a seized axle and pounding on the bar with the heel of their boot. I think the ratchet strap is a good idea too.
 

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popping the driver side axle is easy...you need one thick longer flat screwdriver and/or similar pry-bar and a good large hammer...you take it all apart for axle to be ready to be popped out...you find a spot to from the bottom to stick it in between the trans and axle and you hit the pry or screw-diver with the hammer nice and hard couple times...if it does not pop out you spin the axle couple of inches and repeat until it does...it pops out when the half moon c-clip holding it is facing up, that's why you have to keep spinning it and that is the key, if that c-clip is not in right position you will be there all day...the whole process of popping it out takes about 3 minutes. you are welcome.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·

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Making it way over complicated. Follow dougys info.

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It's not always easy, I have a lot of experience with this type of work and if the circlip becomes deformed even a little and does not want to deflect into its groove, then it can take quite a lot of force to remove the inner cv. This happened on my original inner driver after the 4th or 5th easy removal and took me ages and a special tool like the one in the above post to remove it. Good work VTSpeed

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Can anyone confirm is when axel is installed it has a little bit of in and out play at the transmission? Mine seems to move in and out about 1/4 inch or so after it snaps into the diff but I have an LSD been trying to figure out if that is normal. Thanks
 

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Can anyone confirm is when axel is installed it has a little bit of in and out play at the transmission? Mine seems to move in and out about 1/4 inch or so after it snaps into the diff but I have an LSD been trying to figure out if that is normal. Thanks
I think a small amount of movement is normal. Just be sure it has snapped in.


2002 V70XC, 2003 V40, 2004 S60, 2010 V70
 
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