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I'm ready to switch from the winter tires/rims over to my summer set of rims/tires and was wondering if I can put the tires with the most tread up front? The tires are symmetrical (outside mounting???) and show even wear so far.
 

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The tires with the most tread always go in the rear of the car.
 

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^ I do! :D
 

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usgiorgi, Here's a look at what those TSW's look like now. Little modification. BTW, I put the better tires on the front! :p



 

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I've never liked rivets on wheels. Everything else looks good. The lower viewpoint has me thinking about the foglights and how they could be dressed up a little flashier, to correspond to the highlight glitz and shine, maybe to bring some balance there.
 

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^Good point, not a fan of the rivets either. These wheels will do for now as my pegs are thrashed and need refinishing. Fogs are due for a refresh along with the trim, headlight lenses and grill. I need warmer weather so I can cut loose the juice.
 

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The tires with the most tread always go in the rear of the car.
That's something firestone would say. **** that.

You're supposed to rotate the tires every 6,000-10,000 miles (maybe even more frequently on the R since they have soft tires) to allow them to wear evenly, you don't want the front and the rear to have a big difference in rolling radius, it's not good for the AWD. Put the ones with most tread on the front, because they will wear faster and even out the tread depths.
 

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I second vplay84's advice that tires with the most tread go in the rear. There's a reason why auto and tire manufacturers recommend putting tires with the most tread on the rear. It's much more difficult to recover from the rear losing grip than from the front losing grip. You may like over-steer, but do you want to be in an over-steer situation when you're around other cars on the highway or while exiting onto a ramp? And even if you can handle it, are you the only one who'd ever drive the car? Do you want the rear sliding out while your wife is driving? With regard to DrBrutal's comment that the front tires wear faster and therefore you need to move better treaded tires to the front to keep the wear even, that has not been my experience with my 2004 v70R GT. I expected that my front tires would wear faster, but in fact my rear tires wear faster. In my case this may be because while my front alignment is within spec, in the rear only my toe and caster are within spec while my camber is almost 2 degrees too negative. However, as the R has no rear camber adjustment, I just have to live with my rear tires wearing out early on their inside edges unless I want to install the IPD Rear Camber Bushing Kit or can figure out what is causing my rear camber to be too negative. As I haven't made any mods -- like lowering springs -- that I believe can lead to overly negative rear camber, I wonder if maybe I'm not the only owner whose R has overly negative rear camber and whose rear tires, therefore, are likely to wear significantly faster than the front tires. (Well, I did add a trailer hitch but it was Volvo's own hitch so I don't think that qualifies as a mod.) Regardless, and back to your tire question, if the tread difference between front and back becomes big enough to be a problem, then I'd get new tires before I'd put the pair with less tread on the rear. I know our tires aren't cheap -- at least not if you're getting good tires like Michelin Pilot Super Sports for the summer and Dunlop SP Winter Sport 3Ds for winter -- but getting a little more mileage out of a set of tires isn't worth an increased risk of accident.
 
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