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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, new owner to a 04 V70, FWD -- Non Turbo 2.4. Runs and drives great. However after doing general research I've noticed/discovered that perhaps my timing belt/Tensioner was installed improperly. I'm unfamiliar with how the Tensioner works, but from what I've read it seems the tensioner works on a temperature scale. The tensioner arm adjusts to Cold/Warm/Hot. The arm being pegged right meaning the tension is adjusted for hot, the arm pegged to the far left means adjusted for cold, the arm sitting in the middle adjusted for warm/ambient temp? Is this correct? Is the tensioner adjusted for ambient temp, or temp of the engine when the tensioner was installed?

I plan on doing a full timing kit service, including water pump, so I wanna do my due diligence in gaining the most knowledge. That said, the few videos and tutorials I've seen have shown that the Tensioner arm moves when you apply pressure to the Tbelt. Is this correct? If so, my tensioner arm does not move at all when I apply pressure to my Tbelt. Additionally to this, my Tensioner arm is pegged all the way to the the "hot" position, or the 2 O' clock position. However the engine has not been started in over 24h, going on 48h, but the outside temp has been almost 90f or 32c, so I am little confused as to how it works. Also, there is what I thought was pulley noise, but upon inspection with a Mechanics Stethoscope I've found little to no noise associated with any of the pulley's, so I am wondering if maybe the noise is associated to the Tensioner being incorrectly installed or the Tbelt being too tight due to the above mentioned.

I am moving shortly, so the car will be moving from point A to B, therefore delaying the timing kit install....however if the Tensioner is incorrect, is there a way to relieve the tension on the Tensioner/Tbelt? I want to ensure the car runs optimally until I can actually install the new kit. I will attach pictures of the Tensioner arm being pegged in the "hot" position.

Any help, or general useful info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
130854
130855
 

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The tensioner is damaged because it has been tensioned in the wrong direction. That style tensioner is moved COUNTER clockwise to tension the timing belt. Replace before you make a mole hill into a mountain.
 

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That is the wrong tensioner. You need the later version, the long arm style, probably how this happened.

PN 30637955
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
04 is the split year for the tensioners. He may have the correct one, just incorrectly installed.
So this is the correct tensioner, or can the two tensioner types be used on this car? The tensioner he references does not have the locater piece like the one on my car?
Replace it ASAP. You can see the tab that locates it correctly is also bent.
Thanks. I figured there was something wrong that was plain to see and I was just oblivious.
The tensioner is damaged because it has been tensioned in the wrong direction. That style tensioner is moved COUNTER clockwise to tension the timing belt. Replace before you make a mole hill into a mountain.
Thank you. Knew it was right in front of my face the entire time. Kind of sucks, the water pump on it has a date code of 2018/08, so the timing components look like they were installed fairly recently, just sucks that someone installed them poorly/incorrectly.

Is it possible to slack the tensioner up some to allow the belt to breath properly? If so, is it possible to do on the car, do I need to line up the timing marks again or can I just loosen the bolt, put the allen key in the (eccentric?, I believe it is called), and tension it correctly until I can get the new tensioner on?
 

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Based on the appearance of the block it looks like you have the correct tensioner. You can always verify on FCP's website with your engine serial number. I wouldn't try and salvage that tensioner, not worth the risk vs. the cost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Based on the appearance of the block it looks like you have the correct tensioner. You can always verify on FCP's website with your engine serial number. I wouldn't try and salvage that tensioner, not worth the risk vs. the cost.
Thank you. I'm not looking to salvage the tensioner, but as I mentioned before I am moving and therefore the car needs to move. I am more or less wondering if it would be beneficial to correctly do the tensioner until I can get a new one on. That said if it is just better to leave it as is, then that is ok too.

Is the tensioner replaceable without having to remove the whole belt and thus re-timing things? As I can likely get a tensioner much quicker than a whole kit and avoid any damage either way. I am still getting the kit, but if I can speed up a tensioner to me to avoid a costly disaster, then I don't mind doing that too.
 

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Other way around guys.

That pill shaped protusion above the tensioner isn’t there on the early motors, that’s why the tensioner changes.

Observe:

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hh
Other way around guys.

That pill shaped protusion above the tensioner isn’t there on the early motors, that’s why the tensioner changes.

Observe:

View attachment 130893
I'm confused now. The block in the picture you provided doesn't look like the one I have, so do I get the updated tensioner or stick with the tensioner type that is currently in the car? I want to make sure, because all of the timing kits I have looked with Volvo specific filters and part numbers have the tensioner that is currently already in the car as the "correct" tensioner and kit. But if the one you provided is the correct one and is better, I would rather go with that.
 

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Your tensioner appears correct. Just damaged.

You could try to loosen the center bolt and use the allen to properly tension it. But it's still damaged and you are aware of the potential consequences.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Your tensioner appears correct. Just damaged.

You could try to loosen the center bolt and use the allen to properly tension it. But it's still damaged and you are aware of the potential consequences.
Thanks. I plan on buying an entire timing kit, so regardless the tensioner is getting replaced. That said, I am moving very soon and need to have the car moved from point A, to B.

If I were to loosen the center bolt, how much do I loosen it? Until finger tight? Does the car need to be re-timed, too or have the intake/exhaust cams all at their correct timing marks prior? Or can I just rip the cover off, loosen the bolt and tension it correctly as is? I would prefer to allow the belt to breathe a little and the tensioner be correct until I can get the new stuff on, rather than the belt and tensioner be at constant over-tension/tight due to it being installed incorrectly.
 

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Just loosen it enough to use an allen to turn it back to the proper alignment. You don't have to remove the belt.
 

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As mentioned above the locating tang probably got bent from the eccentric being turned the wrong way or the bolt was too tight when it was turned. To me it's the only thing really looks wrong with the tensioner, still doing it's job just crooked. Thankfully it hasn't blown up the engine yet....

If you're going to re-tension the belt I would say go ahead and line it up to the marks first because that's where the book says to do it.

Not that hard to remove the r/f wheel and pull the liner up to get a socket on the nut.
If you have a long extension you don't even have to pull the wheel, just crank it full right.

-With the marks lined up, loosen the bolt then tighten it back just enough to take up all play.
-Turn the eccentric back counter-clock wise (CCW) until the pointer sweeps to left of center.
-Because your tensioner is bent to the right that means it's center is off to the right, so turn eccentric clockwise (CW) until the pointer is in the middle of the hole in the block or inline with the engine centerline.
-If you go past the mark, do not turn back CCW to the mark. You want to finish the adjustment on the CW stroke, so turn it back CCW until the marker passes to the left then turn CW again being carefully not to go too far this time.
-Now snug the bolt down while keeping the pointer inline with markers. This takes some practice so keep at it until satisfied.
-One thing I do to double check is with your fingers pull on the belt between the tensioner and exhaust cam gear. You should be able to see the tensioner spring forward and back then return to the center marks every time. If you have it too loose or tight this will show up now.
-Don't be afraid to try it again if you fail.
-Another reason to expose the pulley nut is now you want to turn the crank through two revolutions to check your work. If you've set it right the markers will line up as you turn CW and put the belt slack on the tensioner side.

Best of luck, snap some pics if you have any questions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
As mentioned above the locating tang probably got bent from the eccentric being turned the wrong way or the bolt was too tight when it was turned. To me it's the only thing really looks wrong with the tensioner, still doing it's job just crooked. Thankfully it hasn't blown up the engine yet....

If you're going to re-tension the belt I would say go ahead and line it up to the marks first because that's where the book says to do it.

Not that hard to remove the r/f wheel and pull the liner up to get a socket on the nut.
If you have a long extension you don't even have to pull the wheel, just crank it full right.

-With the marks lined up, loosen the bolt then tighten it back just enough to take up all play.
-Turn the eccentric back counter-clock wise (CCW) until the pointer sweeps to left of center.
-Because your tensioner is bent to the right that means it's center is off to the right, so turn eccentric clockwise (CW) until the pointer is in the middle of the hole in the block or inline with the engine centerline.
-If you go past the mark, do not turn back CCW to the mark. You want to finish the adjustment on the CW stroke, so turn it back CCW until the marker passes to the left then turn CW again being carefully not to go too far this time.
-Now snug the bolt down while keeping the pointer inline with markers. This takes some practice so keep at it until satisfied.
-One thing I do to double check is with your fingers pull on the belt between the tensioner and exhaust cam gear. You should be able to see the tensioner spring forward and back then return to the center marks every time. If you have it too loose or tight this will show up now.
-Don't be afraid to try it again if you fail.
-Another reason to expose the pulley nut is now you want to turn the crank through two revolutions to check your work. If you've set it right the markers will line up as you turn CW and put the belt slack on the tensioner side.

Best of luck, snap some pics if you have any questions.
Thanks for the informative response!

Couple questions, you mention line up the timing marks, correct? If for whatever reason I am off a tooth or don't get it 100%, or don't even do it at all, is there risk for engine damage? Tech mentioned to just loosen the tensioner and re-tension as needed, which I assume means to skip the timing mark setup procedure. So I just want to clarify or make 100% sure nothing will happen in the event I don't do this step, or make 100% sure I need to do the timing mark procedure.

About the tensioner itself, do I tension so that the arm is straight between the goal posts, which would be "warm ambient temp", or do I tension/adjust differently as the tang is bent? Lately the ambient temp here has been approximately 90f/32c, but the engine has not been started in over 48h now -- so I am unsure of it all.

Thanks again!
 

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]The block in the picture you provided doesn't look like the one I have
Yes it does.

Look again.

I posted a picture of my engine with the correct tensioner for that block style to illustrate. On yours, the later block tang is very much there. Early engines it doesnt exist whatsoever, its an addition made during the phasing to RNC prepped blocks.

Also post your engine serial please for further clarification.
 
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you mention line up the timing marks, correct? If for whatever reason I am off a tooth or don't get it 100%, or don't even do it at all, is there risk for engine damage? Tech mentioned to just loosen the tensioner and re-tension as needed, which I assume means to skip the timing mark setup procedure. So I just want to clarify or make 100% sure nothing will happen in the event I don't do this step, or make 100% sure I need to do the timing mark procedure.
You don't have to line up the marks but you can so you are sure nothing moves. It's up to you. You can also just make a couple marks with a sharpie so you know nothing moves.

Yes it does.
The picture you posted is of a block different than the OPs.

Your style block:
130972


And his:
130973
 

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@ Appsro,

You may not have to line up the t-marks perfectly but you do want to turn the engine a least a little CW so the belt slack is on the tensioner side.

If the marks are not lined up just be aware the cam(s) might effect the adjustment procedure because valve spring tension may try to rotate the cams one way or the other.

AFA the pointer, as mentioned just line it up with the engine centerline and it will be close enough. Also, a few degrees warmer/cooler wont make enough difference to matter.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Also post your engine serial please for further clarification.
Thank you! Here ya go. When I input the info into FCP, I get the same tensioner style currently in my car rather than the new style. Same deal when I do it with other sites, too. That said when I click on the newer tensioner and do the same procedure, the new tensioner is "verified to fit", so that is my confusion.
130994


You don't have to line up the marks but you can so you are sure nothing moves. It's up to you. You can also just make a couple marks with a sharpie so you know nothing moves
Thanks for all your help. I will invest in a paint marker and mark the belt and cams so that the belt does not move, or if it does I will know.


@ Appsro,

You may not have to line up the t-marks perfectly but you do want to turn the engine a least a little CW so the belt slack is on the tensioner side.

If the marks are not lined up just be aware the cam(s) might effect the adjustment procedure because valve spring tension may try to rotate the cams one way or the other.

AFA the pointer, as mentioned just line it up with the engine centerline and it will be close enough. Also, a few degrees warmer/cooler wont make enough difference to matter.
Thanks! Much appreciate your help.
 
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