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Those of you, who has a lemon XC90 and return it back to Volvo, could you please post the VIN number of the affected vehicle. This could help out a potential buyer in the future by alerting him/her to the issue(s) if they do a simple internet search.
 

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Those of you, who has a lemon XC90 and return it back to Volvo, could you please post the VIN number of the affected vehicle. This could help out a potential buyer in the future by alerting him/her to the issue(s) if they do a simple internet search.
If I were a betting man, I'd think there's some sort of agreement in the buyback not to share info like this... I could be wrong.
 

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Those of you, who has a lemon XC90 and return it back to Volvo, could you please post the VIN number of the affected vehicle. This could help out a potential buyer in the future by alerting him/her to the issue(s) if they do a simple internet search.
If I'm not mistaken, once Volvo accepts a car as a manufacturer's buy back, they are required to title and sell it as such, disclosing everything along the way. Someone correct me if I'm wrong?
 

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If I'm not mistaken, once Volvo accepts a car as a manufacturer's buy back, they are required to title and sell it as such, disclosing everything along the way. Someone correct me if I'm wrong?
Nope. Usually a customer's problem car is taken back to avoid a lemon title. Then repaired and sold at auction.
 

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Nope. Usually a customer's problem car is taken back to avoid a lemon title. Then repaired and sold at auction.
From what I've gathered, buy-back vehicles go through a dealer-dealer auction and, depending on the state, can have branded title or not. I am not sure about Texas specifically.
 

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Should have to crush them. Once a lemon always a lemon for most any car I would think.

Mike
 

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From what I've gathered, buy-back vehicles go through a dealer-dealer auction and, depending on the state, can have branded title or not. I am not sure about Texas specifically.
From my experiences with buy backs, heres what happened:

1) Met criteria for states lemon law, informed dealer and mfg of legal channels (which would ultimately result in vehicle being branded a lemon requiring a title change)
2) Dealer stepped up and informed the regional rep
3) Regional rep immediately agreed to make whole and replaced with similar off the boat vehicle, and picked up a couple lease payments due to the vehicle stuck in the service bays for a month
4) Kept vin, and a couple years later saw the same vehicle making rounds on the used car lots with a clean carfax.

Again no mfgs want to go to court over a lemon, as once the vehicle is titled as such, no one wants to touch that with a 100 foot pole. Easier to take it back, fix it, and hope the problem never resurfaces before the auction block (dealer auction as you were referring to)
 

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If I'm not mistaken, once Volvo accepts a car as a manufacturer's buy back, they are required to title and sell it as such, disclosing everything along the way. Someone correct me if I'm wrong?
I assumed he meant it was sketchy of the car manufacturers and dealers to resell these cars with clean reports by buying them back just before they officially are declared lemons. And I agree.
"Buy back" is a private/individual arrangement. Most of the time the terms of such an agreement involves a comprehensive claim release, as well as a non-disclosure of the terms. As long as the reasons for the buy back do not involve federal DOT and EPA safety regulation violations, the manufacturer may or may not attempt to do a (temporary) fix and dispose of the car at auction. At that point, they are also not required to disclose the reason for the sale. BMW will label their cars as "buy back", but it is up to the new owner to figure out what this means. Carfax does not pick this up. Wholesale or dealer to dealer auction sales are not governed by the same state and federal laws that protect the retail public. The liability comes into play when a licensed dealer sells to the public.

If you know that your car is going to be "taken back" (whether that involves an allowance on a new car or an outright refund), you will be asked to sign such an agreement.

The time to release your VIN is BEFORE you sign.

However, be aware, Volvo reads these forums, guaranteed! Their decision to be cooperative may be based on what they see and read. (but don't let that hold you back from venting and providing honest feedback. Volvo needs to know how we feel about defective products!)

A "lemon" on the other hand can be many different things, including a DOT/EPA recalls. Each state has its own definition as well as the requirement to disclose.
 

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^^^ Yep, I understood. I am just agreeing with the sentiment of the other poster that this process is sketchy. Legal but sketchy. The end result still lacks transparency and deprives future buyers of fair information about the history of the car they are acquiring. Not saying it's unique to Volvo -- it certainly isn't. There is sometimes a difference between what is legal and what is ethical.
 

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I assumed he meant it was sketchy of the car manufacturers and dealers to resell these cars with clean reports by buying them back just before they officially are declared lemons. And I agree.
Exactly. You never know what you're getting and no one is required to disclose this info publicly which means it suddenly will become someone else's problem. I suspected this about relatively new cars that end up on the market as used vehicles, but I guess I hadn't really thought through the mechanics of how it actually works. I commented on this in the thread below.

http://forums.swedespeed.com/showth...na-soften-up&p=2810833&viewfull=1#post2810833

But justifies in my mind the value of paying up to buy a brand new car rather than one that's 1-year old. A 3-year old car on the other hand (after many leases have expired and there's more inventory returning to dealers) makes a lot more sense. While obviously nothing can prevent you from getting stuck with a lemon, seems like a 1-year old car just has higher odds of being trouble than cars that are brand new, or a bit older.
 

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"Buy back" is a private/individual arrangement. Most of the time the terms of such an agreement involves a comprehensive claim release, as well as a non-disclosure of the terms. As long as the reasons for the buy back do not involve federal DOT and EPA safety regulation violations, the manufacturer may or may not attempt to do a (temporary) fix and dispose of the car at auction. At that point, they are also not required to disclose the reason for the sale. BMW will label their cars as "buy back", but it is up to the new owner to figure out what this means. Carfax does not pick this up. Wholesale or dealer to dealer auction sales are not governed by the same state and federal laws that protect the retail public. The liability comes into play when a licensed dealer sells to the public.

If you know that your car is going to be "taken back" (whether that involves an allowance on a new car or an outright refund), you will be asked to sign such an agreement.

The time to release your VIN is BEFORE you sign.

However, be aware, Volvo reads these forums, guaranteed! Their decision to be cooperative may be based on what they see and read. (but don't let that hold you back from venting and providing honest feedback. Volvo needs to know how we feel about defective products!)

A "lemon" on the other hand can be many different things, including a DOT/EPA recalls. Each state has its own definition as well as the requirement to disclose.
THe Federal DOT and EPA safety violations made me chuckle, and reminded me of the E70s having terrible pinch welds on the A pillar for MY2011 or the same MY, driveshafts just spontaneously dropping out. Those were safety issues as well, but either the fix was to remove windshield and re-weld or buybacks. Wonder how many of those are floating around unmended.

Again lets be honest here, the government regulations are guidelines, mfgs know it and like to walk on that thinline. Unfortunate but true.

Only time they act (thats optional as we see due to political debauchery) is after something becomes the hot topic of CNN for a month, and things have hit the fan. Also someone usually has to testify and then forcefully resign.
 

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Sobering stuff.
 

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Regardless of the brand or make it seems that if a problem is big enough to be a lemon buyback due to repair difficulties then the car mfgr would want to solve the problem permanently before reselling or wholesaling. I guess on a general level that indicates the mfgr doesn't mind having two dissatisfied customers, the new car buyer and the used buyer. Both hurt the brand equity especially when it hits the forums.

Thanks,

Mike
 
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