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I enjoy when folks combine the complaint about not having a dipstick and also not wanting to measure the tires pressure yourself =-D
 

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In my mind it's ok to complain or offer constructive criticism of a product.

For example, I would like for my 2016 S60 to have extending sun visors, android/apple car play (since this generation was made from 2011-2018 it doesn't come with as much tech as newer volvos), and ventilated seats.

Before buying my car I knew what it did and didn't have though.

Before buying a car I think it's incumbent upon us to research what features the car has.
 

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-The ability to use the fob to lock the doors while the car is running so I can leave the kids in the car while I run in to grab take out or other quick errands. (The workaround of reaching through the window to lock the door works but is not very elegant)

-walk away locking doors. It’s annoying to have to wait for everyone to close the doors until I lock it. My corvette would lock when I got far enough away from it.
What is the workaround reaching through the window to lock the door while the car is on? I have wanted to do something similar while my dog is in the car and I quickly pick something up.


Nora in Florida
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I enjoy when folks combine the complaint about not having a dipstick and also not wanting to measure the tires pressure yourself =-D
Two very different scenarios. Not having a functional dipstick (or at least dipstick tube that can be checked with factory tool, i.e. my folks’ w211 Mercedes) is merely an annoyance, as I do like to physically check the oil for level and visual condition before long trips. But as long as the car is under warranty and/or the electric sensor doesn’t fail, it’s no big deal. I can’t imagine not having a dipstick makes life any easier for Volvo mechanics…

As for tpms, I’ve already had it happen once in 4 months that my (at the time) pregnant wife was driving while the iTPMS told her one tire was low. She had to divert from her path to visit a tire shop to check everything, only to find one tire 2psi low and no apparent leak. If there were a pressure display, she could have safely continued on to her destination and addressed the pressure after returning safely home.This would become more important if pressure were to drop in a marginal area and/or in the middle of the night. Also this version of tpms is trash…after addinf 2psi to the low tire, it took over 30 miles of driving for the tire pressure warning lights to reset and all four were “orange” the entire time. The dTPMS in my dodge truck & Cadillac wagon show updated pressures almost immediately.

Again, love the xc90, especially the way ours is equipped. Save for the tpms, other few shortcomings are merely annoyances that can be easily overlooked. But am perplexed as to how a company that values safety over all, can omit not only a simple safety feature as real-time psi, but removed it from a vehicle that already had it in 2016! Would happily pay several hundred dollars to have the 2016 system installed if it were possible.
 

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What is the workaround reaching through the window to lock the door while the car is on? I have wanted to do something similar while my dog is in the car and I quickly pick something up.
It's as he described. You put the window down with the car running, then you get out of the car and reach your arm in the window and hit the lock button, and then you pull up on the window switch and it will auto close the window, thinking you are inside the car. Of course, make sure you actually have the key with you!

A dipstick is not a common mechanics diagnostic tool frankly. And you have a digital dipstick in the car that would work just fine. You can see when something is leaking, you don't really have to know how much it's leaking. When low oil gets to the point of affecting other things then it's again, not a concern how low the oil is, the parts are simply not getting oil and they will fail. The only time it could be helpful is for a consumption test to determine the rate at which the oil is being lost into the combustion chamber, and that's really just a means to test to failure of the rings and manual dipstick or electronic, you really have to do a volume test to determine the actual rate. A digital dipstick is far more likely to be used by most consumers.


As for tpms, I’ve already had it happen once in 4 months that my (at the time) pregnant wife was driving while the iTPMS told her one tire was low. She had to divert from her path to visit a tire shop to check everything, only to find one tire 2psi low and no apparent leak. If there were a pressure display, she could have safely continued on to her destination and addressed the pressure after returning safely home.This would become more important if pressure were to drop in a marginal area and/or in the middle of the night. Also this version of tpms is trash…after adding 2psi to the low tire, it took over 30 miles of driving for the tire pressure warning lights to reset and all four were “orange” the entire time. The dTPMS in my dodge truck & Cadillac wagon show updated pressures almost immediately.
This is also an easy to overcome argument. The owners manual clearly says to check your tire pressures weekly. So don't pass the buck onto Volvo because you weren't a dutiful husband to help your wife out. As for Volvo's decision on which system to use, I do fall in the category of appreciating the wheel speed test rather than pressure test for simple function and limited repair needs. The risk of a malfunction is as easy as just ignoring it until you get to a shop and generally far cheaper to repair. People who get in a panic over a low tire pressure light are the same folks who never would check their pressure prior to the addition of TPMS of any sort. You should be able to feel a leak of any concern frankly. It's purpose is to tell you that you haven't been checking your tires on a regular basis.
 

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There`s the reason Volvo didn`t program the FOB to do it. So as to prevent idiots from doing moves like that.
Idiot moves like keeping the car running so my kids don’t freeze or burn up in a locked car?

Do you haul your 3 young kids out of their car seats in extreme weather for a quick 1 minute trip in to grab a pizza?
 

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I enjoy when folks combine the complaint about not having a dipstick and also not wanting to measure the tires pressure yourself =-D
Yup.
For every new car buyer there are likely a few desirable features that were not available, part of an otherwise unneeded option pack or cost too much. The perfect car does not exist. Just do some research, drive some cars and make an informed selection of the car that best fills the need.

For example when test driving 2020 XC90's I asked which tpms system was used. With that information decided that a hand held gauge would be a good supplement.
 

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It's as he described. You put the window down with the car running, then you get out of the car and reach your arm in the window and hit the lock button, and then you pull up on the window switch and it will auto close the window, thinking you are inside the car. Of course, make sure you actually have the key with you!

A dipstick is not a common mechanics diagnostic tool frankly. And you have a digital dipstick in the car that would work just fine. You can see when something is leaking, you don't really have to know how much it's leaking. When low oil gets to the point of affecting other things then it's again, not a concern how low the oil is, the parts are simply not getting oil and they will fail. The only time it could be helpful is for a consumption test to determine the rate at which the oil is being lost into the combustion chamber, and that's really just a means to test to failure of the rings and manual dipstick or electronic, you really have to do a volume test to determine the actual rate. A digital dipstick is far more likely to be used by most consumers.




This is also an easy to overcome argument. The owners manual clearly says to check your tire pressures weekly. So don't pass the buck onto Volvo because you weren't a dutiful husband to help your wife out. As for Volvo's decision on which system to use, I do fall in the category of appreciating the wheel speed test rather than pressure test for simple function and limited repair needs. The risk of a malfunction is as easy as just ignoring it until you get to a shop and generally far cheaper to repair. People who get in a panic over a low tire pressure light are the same folks who never would check their pressure prior to the addition of TPMS of any sort. You should be able to feel a leak of any concern frankly. It's purpose is to tell you that you haven't been checking your tires on a regular basis.
When Volvo's system doesn't tell you which tire is low, yeah, that's on Volvo. I carry a portable battery powered air compressor, tire gauge, and check pressures regularly including the spare. I still freak out about a TPMS light. I cannot decipher if I have all 4 low due to external conditions, or if one is low due to a puncture. Pulling over on a 75mph highway at night is not safe no matter which way you flex it. Add in adverse conditions and the next exit is the way to go. But you risk a blow out if there's one tire low versus all four out of range.

Unless you check all four tires with soapy water before every single drive, then there's no way you can ignore Volvo's poor choice here.

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If you get a puncture that causes rapid depressuring you won't need TPMS to tell you that. Most punctures are slow leaks though and frankly you can keep driving on them with little ill effect other than increased tire wear and decreased economy. A slice or hole will be felt pretty quick. The purpose of the TPMS is to tell you pressure is out of spec, and it is likely that you could have prevented the light if you were checking pressures weekly. The argument that pulling over to check your tires on a highway isn't safe is moot. If it's just low pressure you can keep driving. If it's a bad puncture, you'll know pretty quick, and you'll have to pull over anyhow. TPMS has never been intended as a stop and pull over immediately check regardless of what system it is. If your tires have a slow leak from a puncture or a slow leak from a valve or seal you can just fill up the pressure and continue... you can quickly gauge how bad the leak is by how quick it comes back on. And frankly. it doesn't matter which system you have to do this.
 

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Ralph Nader is working on a sequel, based on the XC90.

I'd prefer no sensors at all but in 45 years of driving I've never had a situation where having direct TPMS was of any benefit over indirect TPMS. I check air pressures around once per month and have a compressor at home. Also, I'd rather not have to pay a few hundred $$ every time a sensor fails. I tend to drive older cars now and the batteries do die at some point.
 

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Idiot moves like keeping the car running so my kids don’t freeze or burn up in a locked car?

Do you haul your 3 young kids out of their car seats in extreme weather for a quick 1 minute trip in to grab a pizza?
If it`s one minute they are not going to freeze or burn up.......obviously you leave them for 10 or 15......dumb move
 

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If you get a puncture that causes rapid depressuring you won't need TPMS to tell you that. Most punctures are slow leaks though and frankly you can keep driving on them with little ill effect other than increased tire wear and decreased economy. A slice or hole will be felt pretty quick. The purpose of the TPMS is to tell you pressure is out of spec, and it is likely that you could have prevented the light if you were checking pressures weekly. The argument that pulling over to check your tires on a highway isn't safe is moot. If it's just low pressure you can keep driving. If it's a bad puncture, you'll know pretty quick, and you'll have to pull over anyhow. TPMS has never been intended as a stop and pull over immediately check regardless of what system it is. If your tires have a slow leak from a puncture or a slow leak from a valve or seal you can just fill up the pressure and continue... you can quickly gauge how bad the leak is by how quick it comes back on. And frankly. it doesn't matter which system you have to do this.
I've had two SPA XC90's that had illuminated TPMS lights on multiple occasions. Not once did it show which tire was low. All 4 showed orange. The system said there was a problem and that's it. And multiple times it was a false positive. There was nothing wrong. How is this beneficial compared to a click of a button and seeing what all four pressures are while driving? Stopping on a freeway must not be in your job description. It is for me and I have a unique respect for physics when I'm stationary and cars are going past at 80+ mph. You seem to have false confidence in other drivers.

I spent 105k miles with a much cheaper car that easily displayed the pressures at any given time (beyond the first minute or two driving). It was always correct. It's fairly common for me to drive from 30 degrees at 9,000-10,000 feet to 100 degrees at 2,000 feet in about 2 hours. A TPMS light on showing all pressures at 29 is a far cry from Volvo's "there's a general problem" system.

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@Ultrarunner511 One flaw in the system is I have seen it report high pressure as low... because it is a simple system it only knows that the wheel speed is out of spec and it is presumed that it is because of low pressure. I'm fine taking points away from Volvo for that. If the system was truly malfunctioning for you then that's not good, nor in spec of the system, but also no different (other than lower cost) when the fancy system has a problem.

It does not show which wheel is out of spec. Again, you should be checking your tires weekly, so if one has gone low from environment, the rest are likely close behind... so having you check the pressure in all four is only good sense if inflating (or deflating) one.

As I said, I would just keep driving and wait for a good time to get off and check the pressure. Unless I felt the pressure had gone down, I would not pull over to the side of the road. I don't know why you would either just for a TPMS light. You keep driving and just know it's something to check when you can (because it's something you didn't check before, or maybe you did pick up a slow leak, which still isn't a big immediate, get hit by traffic concern of mine.

The pro/con is that generally this is a simpler system with less failures, so lower cost. I'm not saying knowing what the pressure is would be bad, but it's fairly unneeded. And I brought it up specifically with the dipstick complaint. Folks want to manually check their oil but want a computer to check their tires. That's a bit silly. But I greatly preferer a simpler system. Knowing the mechanics generally of both, I like the wheel speed sensor best. And like Wayne said, I'd be even more pleased if it just wasn't there at all, but since the wheel speed sensor is used for other systems, it is needed, while a pressure reading system is only for that purpose, so it is an added and generally useful extra thing to go wrong. And the Volvo system is in line with Swedish philosophy of not cluttering when not needed. The purpose is only to tell you the pressure is outside spec... it does this. IMO there is little value in always knowing the exact pressure, or gain from only needing to confirm and adjust a single wheel for the once or twice a year it might come up (if you're not regularly checking pressure)
 

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Yikes…opened up a can here it seems. Maybe the itpms is good enough for most (if it’s even functioning properly). Even my old work truck and bmw don’t have any tpms and I’m fine with it. But for my wife and children, I don’t think anyone can convince me that not having pressure readings is satisfactory. Especially in a vehicle that was purchased primarily for safety, I’d want my wife to be able to see how much longer she can drive safely and at what speed given the readings if she happens to pick up a nail. This such scenario has happened numerous times to different family members, and knowing psi has always come in handy to determine when/where to safely address the issue.

That being said, we still really like our xc90. Just think that it’s chicken**** of Volvo to remove a feature they had already engineered into the xc90 for what appears to be for nothing more than saving a few dollars…
 

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OP you could probably make money with a trade-in with this market. I know there’s tons of people who’d love a blue R design.
 

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1. Auto start on the fob
2. Retractable privacy screens for the rear windows
3. Ventilated and/or massaging front seats (I have the R design)
4. Dash readout for tpms.

What do you think is missing on your XC90 that should be included at this price point?
TPMS…..
131402
 
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Hehe, here's mine used as part of my normal (less than) weekly cleaning / maximum gloss routine - much cheaper than d-TPMS, more accurate than i-TPMS, long lasting (>2.5 years so far), low-power / organically operated, and 100% compatible / transferable with all auto tires.
 

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Hehe, here's mine used as part of my normal (less than) weekly cleaning / maximum gloss routine - much cheaper than d-TPMS, more accurate than i-TPMS, long lasting (>2.5 years so far), low-power / organically operated, and 100% compatible / transferable with all auto tires.
Can you activate it with the key fob or the phone app??

I’m not one to tease safety features but man /knocks on wood/ I haven’t had a flat since I drove my Honda Civic into a median a longggg time ago. I’ve had lower than suggested tire pressure that I caught by walking around my car or using a gauge but it was never dangerous.
 
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