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Were I him, I'd probably put a 100-amp run to the garage, terminating in a pair of NEMA 14-50 outlets. That gives flexibility with the 14-50 (suitable for a pair of 40-amp EVSE like the JuiceBox), or could handle an 80A single EVSE.

Ideally would be a pair of 100A runs, but that's going to cost more breaker space and would be overkill for all but the most demanding cases.
+1. If you only opt for a 50-amp service, make sure to specify copper wire; otherwise aluminum wire may be installed. FWIW in MN, aluminum wire is limited to 32 amps / 40 amps breaker when snaking through insulation.


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The new UL JuiceBox 40 Pro (40 amp max) has heavier gauged wire than the ClipperCreek HCS-40 (32-amp max). Neither have a charge cable with memory coil. Of course, you can manually coil it. It is also portable, but a larger form factor.

P.S., EMotorwerks also sells "approved" plug adapters specially designed for their units, including NEMA14-50 (240v) to 15-5 (120v).
 

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Thanks everyone for the feedback.......I have passed it along.
 

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[...]Ideally would be a pair of 100A runs, but that's going to cost more breaker space and would be overkill for all but the most demanding cases.
GregK,
My 2 cents!

As this is a new construction, I strongly second Zaxxon's idea of 200A in the garage. Teslas can already charge at 70A. I think many people are going to have two EVs in their garage in less than 10 years. It will be good to have enough amperage in the garage to juice up two EVs simultaneously.
 

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To clarify, I think one needs to take a look at expected use case before making a decision. It is ideal as I mentioned to have 100A for each garage space for the most flexible dual-EV setup in the future. But that's also never going to be even close to a requirement for the vast majority of homes, even with 2 EVs capable of 80A charging.

The reason is that at 72A (current Tesla vehicles' highest home charge rate, on a 90+A circuit) in a worst-case vehicle size (Model X for now), you're going to get a full 300-mile charge in 6.5 hours. In other words, 2 100A lines is enough to charge two current top-end EVs from completely empty to full, a total of 600 miles, overnight. The typical use case will be more like 40-50 miles/day per vehicle, which is 2 hours apiece at 40A (eg 2 50A lines). I think you'll find that most existing homes will much more easily accomodate 50A circuits without having to upgrade the electrical panel (and maybe even the service rating to your home) than 2x 100A circuits.

All that said, since it's new construction you're likely looking at a much more trivial cost to do 2x 100A than someone retrofitting an existing home, so that's the route I'd take. I just wanted to go into a bit more detail for anyone who's looking at a retrofit where going with 100A circuits would be much more expensive. The T8 will charge at a max of 16A (20A circuit). Most EVs today will max out in the 20s to 40A (50A circuit). 100A for each spot is ideal. 50A for each spot is going to be more than enough for most people.
 

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To clarify, I think one needs to take a look at expected use case before making a decision. It is ideal as I mentioned to have 100A for each garage space for the most flexible dual-EV setup in the future. But that's also never going to be even close to a requirement for the vast majority of homes, even with 2 EVs capable of 80A charging.

The reason is that at 72A (current Tesla vehicles' highest home charge rate, on a 90+A circuit) in a worst-case vehicle size (Model X for now), you're going to get a full 300-mile charge in 6.5 hours. In other words, 2 100A lines is enough to charge two current top-end EVs from completely empty to full, a total of 600 miles, overnight. The typical use case will be more like 40-50 miles/day per vehicle, which is 2 hours apiece at 40A (eg 2 50A lines). I think you'll find that most existing homes will much more easily accomodate 50A circuits without having to upgrade the electrical panel (and maybe even the service rating to your home) than 2x 100A circuits.

All that said, since it's new construction you're likely looking at a much more trivial cost to do 2x 100A than someone retrofitting an existing home, so that's the route I'd take. I just wanted to go into a bit more detail for anyone who's looking at a retrofit where going with 100A circuits would be much more expensive. The T8 will charge at a max of 16A (20A circuit). Most EVs today will max out in the 20s to 40A (50A circuit). 100A for each spot is ideal. 50A for each spot is going to be more than enough for most people.
So please forgive my lack knowledge regarding this topic.....

After the meeting yesterday with the electrician, my son tells me the electrician plans to run a 220 line to each of the 2 car garages. Thoughts please.......
 

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220/230/240 is accurate. The question is whether the electrician plans to run a 50 amp service or a 100 amp service to each. May as well get pricing for both. 100A could be overkill depending what other uses you may have, but it may or may not cost that much [more] depending on the length of the runs.


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Not enough info. The outlet's capacity is determined by the voltage and amperage. Amperage to the outlet is determined by the gauge of the wire and the size of the breaker at the electrical panel.

So what you need to ask the electrician is what size breaker and what outlet type he's putting in. For 40A charging, you'd want at least a 50A breaker and a NEMA 14-50 outlet. (Per NEC I the US, the breaker must be 25% higher capacity than the sustained draw level.)

Edit: Gary beat me to it. Per his comment, even if you are getting 50A service, I would have the electrician run wiring at sufficient gauge to support 100A in the future. Since it's new wiring that shouldn't be a huge cost delta, and it would make upgrading in the future much less expensive (since you'd need only upgrade the panel/breaker and outlet and not need to run all new wire).
 

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Many thanks....very helpful!!!
 

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Am getting a Xc60 T8. I'm very confused after reading through this thread. If I have an unused 240 volt outlet, I think that I can just change the plug to accommodate the T8's charging cable. Is that correct?

If so, what is the reason for getting a charger? What advantages does the charging unit provide?
 

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Am getting a Xc60 T8. I'm very confused after reading through this thread. If I have an unused 240 volt outlet, I think that I can just change the plug to accommodate the T8's charging cable. Is that correct?
Probably. Not all 240V outlets are created equal--what's the specific outlet and its amperage rating?

If so, what is the reason for getting a charger? What advantages does the charging unit provide?
Remote control/monitoring of the charge status, time-of-use rate, ability to keep your T8's cable in the car in case you need it when on the road rather than swapping it in and out, higher power output for future-proofing. To be clear, none of those may matter to you.
 

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Am getting a Xc60 T8. I'm very confused after reading through this thread. If I have an unused 240 volt outlet, I think that I can just change the plug to accommodate the T8's charging cable. Is that correct?

If so, what is the reason for getting a charger? What advantages does the charging unit provide?
I just read the thread and was confused too so I made a call to my dealer. All you need is a standard 220v wall outlet in the correct configuration offering at least 15 amps. You don't need a charging unit / charging station at all. The T8 comes with a charging cable that you can just plug into your 220v wall outlet. Attached is a photo of the type of 220v wall outlet receptacle configuration you need. Photo provided by my Volvo dealer.


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In fact, you don't even need that. A standard 110/110V outlet will work, just more slowly.

The rest of the discussion on this thread largely covers 'better' setups offering various benefits.
 

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I just read the thread and was confused too so I made a call to my dealer. All you need is a standard 220v wall outlet in the correct configuration offering at least 15 amps. You don't need a charging unit / charging station at all. The T8 comes with a charging cable that you can just plug into your 220v wall outlet. ...
Unfortunately in the US, there is no such thing as a “standard” 240v receptacle. In the US, there are multiple 240v standards - including the NEMA 6-20 which is typically paired with a 20 amp breaker.

The AeroVironment has a NEMA 6-20P and needs a NEMA 6-20R for 240v service which will charge your T8 in ~2.5 hours. See http://www.evsolutions.com/turbocord.

All of this information has been consistent with information on another thread on the same topic.
 

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Unfortunately in the US, there is no such thing as a standard 240v receptacle. The AeroVironment has a NEMA 6-20P and needs a NEMA 6-20R for 240v service which will charge your T8 in ~2.5 hours. See http://www.evsolutions.com/turbocord.

All of this information has been consistent with information on another thread on the same topic.
How is this different from the 240v cord that comes with the vehicle?

I'm now back to being thoroughly confused.

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