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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I searched and couldn't find any real info. or reviews on this. What has been the experience with these tires on medium to light snow? I realize snow tires are optimal, but I'd like get through the winters without them and only use my wife's SUV when it gets really bad.
 

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They're OK. I used them last winter in the two or three major snowfalls we had. I did feel that my FWD S70 on snows felt much more planted, stable, and predictable than the AWD S60 with the Continental all seasons, though. I didn't get stuck but didn't have the confidence I like to feel, especially when braking. Read Automobile's test of tires in this month's issue...the All Seasons they tested took twice as long to stop as the snows.
 

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They're OK. I used them last winter in the two or three major snowfalls we had. I did feel that my FWD S70 on snows felt much more planted, stable, and predictable than the AWD S60 with the Continental all seasons, though. I didn't get stuck but didn't have the confidence I like to feel, especially when braking. Read Automobile's test of tires in this month's issue...the All Seasons they tested took twice as long to stop as the snows.
Stopping distance, I agree (with the snows getting better performance than A/S tires).

However, if you need some uphill traction, the best snow tire on a FWD car will not come close to an AWD with A/S tires. Therefore, one will have to pick and choose his/her own battles. Of course, AWD and snow tires are an unbeatable combo. Otherwise, with an AWD car, I would err on the side of A/S and being extra careful with speed (which should be the case any way, when weather conditions are poor).
 

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Most of the reviews on TireRack.com say that they're kinda "eh" at best, or pretty bad at worst. Though, most reviews of the Continental Tires aren't all that favorable.
 

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However, if you need some uphill traction, the best snow tire on a FWD car will not come close to an AWD with A/S tires. Therefore, one will have to pick and choose his/her own battles. Of course, AWD and snow tires are an unbeatable combo. Otherwise, with an AWD car, I would err on the side of A/S and being extra careful with speed (which should be the case any way, when weather conditions are poor).
I would respectfully disagree. Any AWD system can only transfer torque from wheels that have traction, to wheels that don't. I've seen enough SUVs with all seasons spinning their tires, while guys with RWD studded tires went sailing uphill.
 

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I would respectfully disagree. Any AWD system can only transfer torque from wheels that have traction, to wheels that don't. I've seen enough SUVs with all seasons spinning their tires, while guys with RWD studded tires went sailing uphill.
I am sorry but we will have to agree to...disagree! ;) I have also seen plenty of such driving incompetency as well. However, in the past 11 years of snow driving, I have had winter tires on my FWD V70 and have driven many AWD Volvo all with A/S tires. The AWDs tackled pretty much any snowy hill in the Philadelphia suburbs including unplowed snow of as deep as 10 to 12". My V70 did fine with snows but was more limited in steep hills. AWD w/ good A/S will outperform (in traction, not stopping distance) any FWD or (even worse) RWD w/ snows or studs.
 

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A bit unrelated to the whole talk here, but I for one don't understand how people that buy a $30-40k+ car - car for which one of they selling points is it's safety - will just ignore one of the key points in safety which is a good tire.
It's the most important safety "feature" that we as drivers have control over and yet, many people will just ignore it (either because they are uninformed, misinformed or worse : too cheap)

A winter tire is good in winter not just because the tire thread is different - it's because the composition of the rubber is different. It behaves differently in cold weather as opposed to A/S or summer tires.
I'm sure you all saw videos on how tires behave (especially the one with the 3 BMW's on the ice rink) so I'm not going to post it... But if you do care for your safety *and* the safety of others, you will buy dedicated winter tires.
 

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A bit unrelated to the whole talk here, but I for one don't understand how people that buy a $30-40k+ car - car for which one of they selling points is it's safety - will just ignore one of the key points in safety which is a good tire.
It's the most important safety "feature" that we as drivers have control over and yet, many people will just ignore it (either because they are uninformed, misinformed or worse : too cheap)

A winter tire is good in winter not just because the tire thread is different - it's because the composition of the rubber is different. It behaves differently in cold weather as opposed to A/S or summer tires.
I'm sure you all saw videos on how tires behave (especially the one with the 3 BMW's on the ice rink) so I'm not going to post it... But if you do care for your safety *and* the safety of others, you will buy dedicated winter tires.
My sentiments, exactly. Except for one thing. I hate to buy snows for a lease car. I have dedicated snows for the two I own and was prepared to buy them for the S60 but was pleasantly surprised at how well the Conti's did. I think the current Haldex set up needs to be given a lot of the credit for that.
 

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A bit unrelated to the whole talk here, but I for one don't understand how people that buy a $30-40k+ car - car for which one of they selling points is it's safety - will just ignore one of the key points in safety which is a good tire.
It's the most important safety "feature" that we as drivers have control over and yet, many people will just ignore it (either because they are uninformed, misinformed or worse : too cheap)

A winter tire is good in winter not just because the tire thread is different - it's because the composition of the rubber is different. It behaves differently in cold weather as opposed to A/S or summer tires.
I'm sure you all saw videos on how tires behave (especially the one with the 3 BMW's on the ice rink) so I'm not going to post it... But if you do care for your safety *and* the safety of others, you will buy dedicated winter tires.
Absolutely correct! All season tires do not perform well in cold temperatures because of the compounds used in them. I live in snow country and would never consider anything but dedicated snow tires for winter driving. It's not only the ability to move forward, but also braking and steering performance that are dramatically improved.

BTW, AWD is a huge asset in slick driving conditions. If anyone sees SUV's spinning their tires in the snow, my guess is that they are either FWD or 4WD with 4WD not engaged.
 

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Absolutely correct! All season tires do not perform well in cold temperatures because of the compounds used in them. I live in snow country and would never consider anything but dedicated snow tires for winter driving. It's not only the ability to move forward, but also braking and steering performance that are dramatically improved.

+1. There are days when I wish some of the snow belt states would just mandate winter tires for certain months. There is nothing I hate more than getting stuck behind the 10 year old econobox doing 5-10 mph with bald A/S or summer tires, or worse the same care running up on my bumper in the middle of snow storm. The cost of a cheap pair of winter tires is almost always less than your deductible anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
A bit unrelated to the whole talk here, but I for one don't understand how people that buy a $30-40k+ car - car for which one of they selling points is it's safety - will just ignore one of the key points in safety which is a good tire.
It's the most important safety "feature" that we as drivers have control over and yet, many people will just ignore it (either because they are uninformed, misinformed or worse : too cheap)

A winter tire is good in winter not just because the tire thread is different - it's because the composition of the rubber is different. It behaves differently in cold weather as opposed to A/S or summer tires.
I'm sure you all saw videos on how tires behave (especially the one with the 3 BMW's on the ice rink) so I'm not going to post it... But if you do care for your safety *and* the safety of others, you will buy dedicated winter tires.
Wow, all I asked was a simple question.:rolleyes: I really don't need a sermon on winter tire performance or their necessity. I have anytime access to a vehicle with adequate performance for the worst winter conditions. I just don't want to hassle with winter tires, if the Contis will easily handle lower accumulations of snow, that's all I asked in my original question. I don't live in the snowiest of states.
 

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I had no issues running Michelin Pilot Sport A/S+ on my 07 S60R in the winter time, I was able to navigate through everything during that really bad blizzard Christmas morning a couple of years ago; felt like I had Winter Tires on my car. Snow tires are nice to have and if you don't live in an area that consistantly gets slammed by snow, than I think if you pick a good UHP A/S (e.g. Continental ExtremeContact DWS, Michelin Pilot Sport A/S+, etc.) you'll be perfectly fine.
 

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Wow, all I asked was a simple question.:rolleyes: I really don't need a sermon on winter tire performance or their necessity. I have anytime access to a vehicle with adequate performance for the worst winter conditions. I just don't want to hassle with winter tires, if the Contis will easily handle lower accumulations of snow, that's all I asked in my original question. I don't live in the snowiest of states.
Then don't bother with winter tires. We were all trying to inform, not sermonize, so you could make an informed decision. Sorry if that somehow offended you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Then don't bother with winter tires. We were all trying to inform, not sermonize, so you could make an informed decision. Sorry if that somehow offended you.
I'm not offended. As I said in my original post, I realize winter tires are optimal. I specifically asked about the Contis, that's all I requested info. on. I didn't need a lesson on winter tires. :facepalm:
 

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Wow, all I asked was a simple question.:rolleyes: I really don't need a sermon on winter tire performance or their necessity. I have anytime access to a vehicle with adequate performance for the worst winter conditions. I just don't want to hassle with winter tires, if the Contis will easily handle lower accumulations of snow, that's all I asked in my original question. I don't live in the snowiest of states.
Each with his own I guess. You can look at it however you want - I for one would use winter tires even if there's no snow but the temperature dips below 5C...let alone when there's snow involved.
 

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I would respectfully disagree. Any AWD system can only transfer torque from wheels that have traction, to wheels that don't. I've seen enough SUVs with all seasons spinning their tires, while guys with RWD studded tires went sailing uphill.
OK, studded tires (generally illegal in the USA) are a whole order of magnitude better than any non-studded snow tire.

At a few ice racing events my R (and various Audis, Evos, STIs, etc) with AWD and snow tires would run the course in the 2:20-2:30 range. Some RWD cars with snows ran in around 2:40 or so. Then there was an old FWD Golf with ridiculous studded tires. It ran in the 1:50s (and not because the driver was amazing either).
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Each with his own I guess. You can look at it however you want - I for one would use winter tires even if there's no snow but the temperature dips below 5C...let alone when there's snow involved.
I get it and realize that... but again I just simply asked for reviews or experiences with these specific Contis on a T6 or T6 R, on snow.
 

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I get it and realize that... but again I just simply asked for reviews or experiences with these specific Contis on a T6 or T6 R, on snow.
Got it.
I got my car in Nov. '10, which came with those tires. Before I managed to switch to winter tires it snowed like hell... I did not feel in control (especially when it came to braking), for the few trips that I did do on those tires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Got it.
I got my car in Nov. '11, which came with those tires. Before I managed to switch to winter tires it snowed like hell... I did not feel in control (especially when it came to braking), for the few trips that I did do on those tires.
Thanks... I'm sure my winters don't begin to compare with yours.
 

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I searched and couldn't find any real info. or reviews on this. What has been the experience with these tires on medium to light snow? I realize snow tires are optimal, but I'd like get through the winters without them and only use my wife's SUV when it gets really bad.
If you like the Michelin product and you want high all-around ratings, check out the Michelin Primacy MXM4. I don't need an "ultra-high performance" tire, but I do want great handling, braking, wear life, and ability in light to moderate snow.

Guess it all comes down to how you personally want to spend your hard earned money. ;)
 
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