SwedeSpeed - Volvo Performance Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
584 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How much skill does it take to replace the struts/shocks with new springs? Also, what is the bets shock/strut for a everyday driver? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
773 Posts
Re: Struts & Shocks & Springs (myVolvoS60T5)

check out this site. It is for an 850, but the process is identical.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
773 Posts
Re: Struts & Shocks & Springs (wizzard_al)

try again, here is the site:<p><A HREF="http://members.shaw.ca/heeeeee/strut" TARGET="_blank">http://members.shaw.ca/heeeeee/strut</A>/<br>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,486 Posts
Re: Struts & Shocks & Springs (myVolvoS60T5)

The fronts are fairly easy, the same as in the instructions linked for 850. The rear springs are a PITA, beyond my skills and nerves. Took my dealer 3 hours to get the old ones out. If I did not want to lower (used Evolve, which are too stiff for Bilstein HD), I would just use Bilstein HD shocks with stock springs and sways.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,009 Posts
Re: Struts & Shocks & Springs (myVolvoS60T5)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>myVolvoS60T5</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">Also, what is the bets shock/strut for a everyday driver? Thanks.</TD></TR></TABLE><p>Depends on the roads you drive on. If they're always glassy smooth, pick the Bilsteins. For roads with lots of tar strips and potholes, pick the Koni FSD. The FSD does a superb job of damping the potholes and ruts while giving great controllability in the twisties. <p>They do this by actually having <b>two</b> damping rates, both hydraulic, i.e., no electronics, wiring, or other complexity, just a pure, simple bolt-on. FSD does 4C's job even better than 4C <i>without the electronics.</i><p>The first damping rate is the "1 Hz mode," used in the twisties. It's very stiff. This is what gives you the great handling, feel, and braking. But if the shock were this stiff all the time, you'd get hammered and lose control on the potholes and bumps.<p>So, what Koni does is it has a bypass hydaulic path in the shock for the "10 Hz mode", or pothole/tar strip regime. The equivalent shock damping is about 3 times less (softer) than the 1 Hz mode. Hence, the shock "feels" soft on the ruts. But as soon as you're out of the ruts, it automatically reverts back to the "stiff" 1 Hz rate.<p>so you get superb damping and handling with a very decent ride over rougher roads. it's great for a daily driver.<p>when I put the FSD on my S60 it improved on-center feel immensely. And I have the factory optional T5 sport sway bars (24 mm front, 21 mm rear)<p>One disadvantage of the FSD is you <b> must</b> use stock-height springs. If a lowering spring is used, you run the risk of bottoming out the shock during hard cornering on rough ground. If this happens, the shock gets 'confused' and you get some really weird damping rates and possible controllability issues. so stick with the stock height springs, (or leave stock springs in place) and you'll be fine.<p>another advantage of the FSD is you can bump up the tire pressure to the full-recommended 38 psi and you won't get hammered like you do with the Bilsteins. the higher pressure will improve your gas mileage a tad. I've been running at 39 psi in my T5 hand I've been getting 30 - 33.5 mpg highway (at 68 mph with cruise control on) and there's been no problems with a jarring ride on the rough roads we have here in LA.<p>Best of luck.<p>See FSD at <A HREF="http://www.koni-na.com/fsd/index2.html" TARGET="_blank">http://www.koni-na.com/fsd/index2.html</A><p>You can buy FSD from IPD at $800 a set for all four, or you can buy them direct from Koni at <A HREF="http://www.koni-na.com/display.cfm?mt_id=1&mod_id=0&mak_id=46&submit=Continue" TARGET="_blank">http://www.koni-na.com/display...tinue</A> for $600 for all four.<br><BR><BR>
<i>Modified by JPL Guy at 7:32 AM 3-25-2006</i>
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top