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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My start/stop quit working (hallelujah!) and the dealer says the support battery is dying. $400+ to replace. I'm not interested in replacing but if it starts throwing dash messages when it dies I may have to to keep the wife happy. Where is it? Is it a unique battery or normal type? If removed or dead will that present issues? 2015 V60 Drive-E T5

Edit: Found the Volvo part # 30659531 but not sure on size.
 

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Your local auto-parts store will likely have it. I'm assuming it is the same battery as my wife's 2015 XC60, and my 2016 S60 (both T5 Drive-E). The 2 stores closest to me, O'Reilly's and Autozone, both had compatible batteries in stock.

Now I assumed Autozone could handle replacing it, as they do for free... they really struggled with it and I had to send my wife a link to the step-by-step I found somewhere here on the forum. I managed to figure out the swap without the instructions, and I barely work on my cars.

On a note you'll likely care about: when we bought my wife's XC60 (used with 55k miles) the start-stop didn't work because of the battery. We drove it for over a year before the car exhibited any other signs of a dying battery. Even then it was just a little slow to start for 3 days before we got it replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Thmstec. Where was the battery located (generally) in the car. I can't find any mention of replacing it anywhere.
 

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These two links should help.
http://www.volvohowto.com/how-to-replace-the-battery-in-volvo-s60-v60-xc60-s80-v70-xc70/
https://www.paulstravelpictures.com/Volvo-XC60-12V-Automotive-Battery-Replacement-Guide/

While the pictures are from an XC60, its nearly identical in my S60. Just need a Phillips and 10mm socket wrench + extension
That is the main battery, not the support battery. The support battery is located under the cowl cover on the passenger side. Its a small 180 amp battery.

On a side note, since you had your main battery replaced, you'll need to reset the BMS to get the most life out of it. You'll need a dealer or VIDA for that.
 

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On a side note, since you had your main battery replaced, you'll need to reset the BMS to get the most life out of it. You'll need a dealer or VIDA for that.
I thought it was understood the BMS reset wasn't needed for the Drive-E cars, cause the system learns within an hour or so that it is a new battery... but I could be wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks all. No Vida here so if I ever consider doing this that really adds to the cost. No wonder dealer cost was >$400 for an $80 battery.
 

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If you replace the battery with one of identical capacity, just leave the car with everything switched off and locked for 8 hours. The system will reset itself.
 

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Any car that is equipped with a BMS needs it reset when replacing the battery.
If you replace the battery with one of identical capacity, just leave the car with everything switched off and locked for 8 hours. The system will reset itself.
This is going to go on forever, isn't it?
 

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To clarify, the BMS only needs to be reset when replacing the main battery. The support battery can be replaced without requiring a BMS reset.
 

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Well, Tech is a certified Volvo technician and the other person is a random guy from the internet, so I'm going to go with Tech's advice as more likely correct.
Well, as the random guy from the internet, I'd like to suggest we're both right!

Volvo do state that if the vehicle battery is changed, or the BMS sensor is disconnected for any other reason, the sensor must be reset through VIDA.

However, VIDA also states that when charging the battery, the negative charger cable must never be connected to the battery negative terminal, as this will cause the BMS sensor to assume an incorrect reading and may, amongst other issues, cause the start/stop system to be disabled. It goes on to explain that should this occur, the battery monitoring sensor can be reset by leaving the car in sleep mode for 4 to 6 hours (okay, I said 8 hours, sorry!) and that this method can also be used where the battery or BMS has been disconnected for any reason.

Sleep mode means that the ignition key has been removed, all doors and hatches are closed and the car is locked.

Whilst I can't use VIDA on my Volvo, as it is too new and being in the UK I can only access the offline 2015 version of VIDA, I do have several multi-make diagnostic tools including a BMS reset tool which covers Volvo. It has two functions. The first simply resets the BMS if the battery has been disconnected for any reason. The second function reprograms the CEM with the battery capacity if the original battery has been changed for a new battery of larger or smaller capacity, so that the BMS can correctly calculate the SOC in relation to the new battery capacity.

Last year, when my car was serviced by my incompetent Volvo dealer (another story I won't go into right now) the tech connected the battery support charger to both main battery terminals in direct contravention of the instructions in VIDA. I know this because I saw the service on video. When I picked up the car, the start/stop function was disabled, as VIDA states that it may be in those circumstances. When I got home, I parked the car in my garage and left it in sleep mode overnight. Next day when I started it, start/stop was fully functional again and I took credible voltage and SOC readings via diagnostics.

A few weeks ago, I had occasion to disconnect the battery again whilst working on the car. When I reconnected it, start/stop was again disabled. Left it in sleep mode overnight, all working again next day, same result as above.

Most modern cars "require" diagnostic equipment to carry out a variety of resetting functions, but often the manufacturers also include "back doors" that allow the same procedures to be achieved without using any special tools at all. For example Volvo use VIDA to reset the service message. There are other diagnostic tools that will reset it too, but it can also be done manually with a sequence of ignition and button presses on most Volvos.

I suspect they do this so that the vehicles can still be maintained in parts of the world where access to specialist equipment or software may not always be readily available.

Anyway, as just a random guy from the internet and a retired forensic mechanical vehicle examiner for three police forces, I still say we're both correct. So do it whichever way you prefer ;)

If it's imperative that you need the BMS reset instantly, so that you can use the car or hand it back to a customer within a short time and in a fully functional condition, use VIDA or a BMS reset tool. If you don't have access to VIDA or a BMS reset tool, you can leave the car in sleep mode for 4-6 hours. Either way should work.
 

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There is a counter in the CEM that counts days since last BMS reset. This can only be reset with VIDA.

I have had numerous customers come in 6 months or so after they had their battery replaced elsewhere complaining of a low battery message. First thing I do is check that counter and of course, it wasn't reset. I'm sure they've parked the car for 4 or 6 hours since the battery was replaced.

I charge their battery and load test it. When I know it's good, I reset the BMS and send them on their way.
 

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Well, Tech is a certified Volvo technician and the other person is a random guy from the internet, so I'm going to go with Tech's advice as more likely correct.
...a retired forensic mechanical vehicle examiner for three police forces, I still say we're both correct.
I'll take the word of Tech, an actual Volvo factory mechanic, over the word of a glorified insurance adjuster, especially when that glorified insurance adjuster thinks that working for the police is somehow relevant to the evaluation of his technical knowledge.
 

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Well, just shows that you have absolutely no idea what my job entailed or the qualifications required, but absolutely nothing to do with a loss adjuster in any shape or form.

Anyway, by the by. I wouldn't normally mention it at all but your random guy from the internet remark wound me up.

Brilliant welcome to the forum. I think I'll stick to our UK forums in future. You must work in public relations or customer care I guess!
 

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Any car that is equipped with a BMS needs it reset when replacing the battery.
Well, just shows that you have absolutely no idea what my job entailed or the qualifications required, but absolutely nothing to do with a loss adjuster in any shape or form.

Anyway, by the by. I wouldn't normally mention it at all but your random guy from the internet remark wound me up.

Brilliant welcome to the forum. I think I'll stick to our UK forums in future. You must work in public relations or customer care I guess!
Welcome to the forum. This may not have been the welcome you wanted, but based on how you write, I bet you can handle it. One of the reasons you got this welcome is because this exact topic has been heavily debated on the forum already. We don't expect you to know that based on your post count. Nor do we expect you to know that Tech is one of the most valuable members on the board and I can't name a single time he's ever steered us wrong. Zenmnervolt tells it like it is and doesn't care who he pisses off, but he has a ton of knowledge and knows a thing or two about our cars. I can see why "glorified insurance adjuster" would push your buttons, but I have no idea why "random guy from the internet" would wind you up. As far as we could tell, you were 100% brand new here making your first post, never had a single interaction with any of us, and said something in direct contradiction to a Certified Volvo Technician with 2,500+ posts and several years on the forum. Anyone with that knowledge would listen to Tech over you. Don't take it personally.

I don't know what you drive, but if your car at all matches the US versions of the current Volvos, there's a lot of good info here. We may not be as polite as UK forums, but if you need proof that we're better than most American forums, check out this post from 2 days ago https://forums.swedespeed.com/showt...ng-Volvo-Thanks-for-the-civilized-discussions
 

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Thanks @meade18

You're quite right, I had no idea of the history of either the topic or the posters. Just trying to be helpful and rather taken aback by the response, but I take your comments on board and for my part I apologise for any upset caused.

Back to the reason I'm here. I have a V40 which I have to say is a lovely car, but I don't think it's sold in North America.

Being recently retired I have no need for a larger car, but I wanted to avoid the current trend amongst many of our cars of fitting very small but highly stressed 3 or 4 cylinder engines with relatively high turbo boost into compact and even mid size cars to chase ever lower emissions. I'm not impressed by either the reliability or driveability of many of them, so a comparable sized car with a larger capacity and understressed engine with a decent torque band from low rpm was appealing, along with the comfort and better than most of the market security.

I have to say I've not been disappointed and I think the 2 litre VEA (Drive E) petrol is a cracking engine.

My only real criticism is the lack of a physical dipstick and the quite appalling (in my view) electronic implementation, which led me via Google to a long thread on this site and the reason I joined.

Anyway, I'll but out for now 🙂
 
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