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here is the UOA. It seems to be well worth it to change it out at 5k or even earlier.
Thanks for providing a great education! "Comments" reads (consistent with what I thought I knew) "there's a lot of metal...from the break-in of new parts," that can seem "scary," but "is normal." I understood that, in the old days, cautious drivers changed oil after the first thousand miles to remove that metal to avoid internal abrasion.

But "Properties" reads "Insolubles %" "Should be" "<0.6 but sample is actually way below, at just "0.1."

Begs the question, "why change oil at 5,000 miles?" Is the level of dissolved metallic elements, eg., 29 ppm iron, problematic? Do the dissolved elements from left-over machining lubricants, eg. Silicon, impair the oil's viscosity and lubricating function?

Just a liberal arts major trying to understand. No war, holy or otherwise, intended. :)
 

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(I also do my own electrical work, all house IT work, minor plumbing, drywall, painting, gardening, brake jobs, minor carpentry) Electrical engineer during week days! :thumbup::beer::D
The best kind of engineer! :thumbup: :D

I started doing most/all of my own work in an effort to be more certain of the quality of the work being done. As time has gone on and I've found a trust-worthy indy Volvo master tech, I've been more willing to pass work off again. Most of the home/house stuff gets done by me, unless it's beyond my skills or beyond the effort I'm interested in exerting. LOL

Really nice write up!
 

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Thanks for this thread. I thought I had everything I needed until I lowered the skid plate and noticed the oil filter canister.
A quick search @ the local autoparts stores came up empty so I searched the forum and found this thread. Luckily Amazon has same day delivery so I'll have the filter wrench by 9PM tonight. I didnt think any manufacturer still placed their filter at the bottom of the engine.

I DIY everything if within reason. No tech is going to care about your things as much as you do.
Not to mention the cost savings. If I had a mechanic install all the mods on my Wrangler it would have cost me 3 times as much.

Cheers!
 

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Thanks for this. I couldn't find this thread for some reason when I did a search on the forum. I ended up finding it on a google search. My only question is, is this a T8 and if not does anyone know if there are any significant differences in changing the oil on the hybrid model? I always do my own maintenance and when I asked the a local salesman this question while preparing for our OSD purchase, he made it sound like it was some major deal to change on a hybrid and that I would need a lift to do it and would have to remove lots of components to get to it. It scared me a bit since I'm not familiar with hybrid vehicles, especially a European hybrid. He also mentioned that an oil change at the dealership with synthetic would run about $200. That to me is a deal breaker.

I'm more used to the $30 synthetic oil changes that I do myself in my driveway. I even change my own brakes. If you know how much a brake job costs then you can imagine how much money that saves, as a set of front brakes can typically be bought for well under $100 and they might take about 45 minutes tops to change on both sides. I do my own maintenance because I trust myself more, and I don't enjoy throwing money out the window for things I can easily do myself. I even have a radiator for my Tundra setting in the garage now waiting for me to install it. My truck was overheating one day and I stopped to have it checked out. Their diagnosis was a small hole in the radiator and offered to replace it for $1300. Not long before this I had my dad help me replace the water pump in the same truck which required us to remove the radiator, so I knew it wouldn't be THAT big of a job.

Anyway, I took the truck home and googled for a new radiator and found one for $230. That is a near $1100 savings. So aside from having to interfere with some weird hybrid electronics on the XC90, I plan to do the oil changes myself. The only down side I can see from this how to is the cartridge filters which are a pain in the butt and make a huge mess. Toyota uses the same thing and I hate them.
 

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Like I mentioned in your other post, there is no difference between a T6 and T8 with regard to the oil change.

I wouldn't expect to find a set of brakes for $100 for that car. And if you do, there is a difference between OEM and cheap aftermarket parts.
 

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Like I mentioned in your other post, there is no difference between a T6 and T8 with regard to the oil change.

I wouldn't expect to find a set of brakes for $100 for that car. And if you do, there is a difference between OEM and cheap aftermarket parts.
Ahh I must have missed that part. Its good to know then that there is no difference. From the looks of it I won't even need a lift then. I am fully aware of what an OEM part is as well. Aftermarket parts aren't always cheap either, but OEM parts are always expensive. As far as brakes go there are very little differences. They do make those semi metallic brake pads but I hate those because they seem to damage the rotor easier, so I usually just go OEM or something similar. Even a quick search for OEM brake pads for a 2018 XC90 turned up a set of front brake pads for $137 which isn't that bad either, especially when you consider a shop will charge you up to $300 per axle to change your brakes. Drive in with a new hybrid XC90 and expect to get hosed.

https://www.pelicanparts.com/catalog/SuperCat/10897/VOL_10897_BRKPAD_pg1.htm

Oh and to stick with the topic, I also found this link to a kit which includes everything you need to do the oil change on the XC90. I haven't priced it out yet to see how it compares, but it doesn't seem too bad for synthetic oil from Germany which includes the filter.

https://www.blauparts.com/volvo-xc90-oil-change-kit-20l-31372212.html
 

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Yeah you may not need a lift. A T30 for the splash pan screws, a 6mm allen to drain the filter, the filter wrench and a 17mm for the drain plug is all you need.

There certainly can be a difference between OEM brakes and cheap aftermarket ones. I've seen many, many cars come in with aftermarket brakes with a noticeable difference in pedal feel and stopping distance. And yes, it is always more expensive to have someone do something vs. doing it yourself. Labor isn't free. Call a plumber to replace a water heater and he will charge more than it would cost to do it yourself. Nothing wrong with that.
 

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Perhaps, if the car has air suspension, it is a good idea to place stands while working under the car with the weels on the ground.
Maybe it is feasable to choose offroad mode to bring it in the highest position.
 

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Thanks for providing a great education! "Comments" reads (consistent with what I thought I knew) "there's a lot of metal...from the break-in of new parts," that can seem "scary," but "is normal." I understood that, in the old days, cautious drivers changed oil after the first thousand miles to remove that metal to avoid internal abrasion.

But "Properties" reads "Insolubles %" "Should be" "<0.6 but sample is actually way below, at just "0.1."

Begs the question, "why change oil at 5,000 miles?" Is the level of dissolved metallic elements, eg., 29 ppm iron, problematic? Do the dissolved elements from left-over machining lubricants, eg. Silicon, impair the oil's viscosity and lubricating function?

Just a liberal arts major trying to understand. No war, holy or otherwise, intended. :)
There is no compelling reason in modern engines under normal duty to perform early oil changes other than "peace of mind". This sample is yet more evidence on the already mountainous pile of evidence backing up the idea of following manufacturer suggested oil change intervals. There is nothing "wrong" with early intervals, you are just trading dollars for your mental state without the benefit of evidence to justify your action.
 

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Yeah you may not need a lift. A T30 for the splash pan screws, a 6mm allen to drain the filter, the filter wrench and a 17mm for the drain plug is all you need.

There certainly can be a difference between OEM brakes and cheap aftermarket ones. I've seen many, many cars come in with aftermarket brakes with a noticeable difference in pedal feel and stopping distance. And yes, it is always more expensive to have someone do something vs. doing it yourself. Labor isn't free. Call a plumber to replace a water heater and he will charge more than it would cost to do it yourself. Nothing wrong with that.
Yes I agree to an extent. Don't take offense, but I assume you are a technician and its why you have such a strong opinion on the subject. I would use a shop for major repairs or obviously for warranty work, and I understand that the term major is different for everyone, but oil changes are very very minor and $200 is beyond ridiculous, which is the price I was quoted from the salesman for a dealership oil change with synthetic oil. As for brakes I imagine there are a lot less people who are comfortable changing them, but again, its a very minor normal wear and tear item that is very easy to do. I think if most people did a little research and even found someone to help them the first time, they would realize just how easy it is and would gladly do it themselves and save hundreds and sometimes thousands of dollars. Everyone should at the very least be able to perform normal wear and tear maintenance to their own vehicles such as change a tire if its flat, change the oil, change wipers, put gas in etc etc. Now I get it, someone people are older or maybe have injuries or something that makes it harder to do, but unless you are made of money, it pays to at least do the minor stuff yourself, and oil changes and even brakes are both very minor things, especially when you have disk brakes. That is why I love these forums and love a good how to thread. It helps to build confidence for those a little nervous about doing maintenance on their car. It might be a while, but if there isn't one already I will post a how to on a brake change for the XC90 when ever I get ready to do it.

P.S. I agree some aftermarket items are cheap, (not quality parts) but some are just as good or better than OEM. You just have to do a little research, or in my case trial and error. I found out over time that metallic pads are not worth the price, especially when you have to replace a rotor as well.
 

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There is no compelling reason in modern engines under normal duty to perform early oil changes other than "peace of mind". This sample is yet more evidence on the already mountainous pile of evidence backing up the idea of following manufacturer suggested oil change intervals. There is nothing "wrong" with early intervals, you are just trading dollars for your mental state without the benefit of evidence to justify your action.
I was thinking the same thing, but wasn't going to open up that can of worms. I've read similar things on other car/motorcycle forums and that seems to be the typical consensus. Its just peace of mind, but totally unnecessary. If it was so vital to do I'm guessing Volvo and other manufactures would make sure to highlight that as a must do for new cars.
 

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Thank you! I think I will invest in these parts and do my next oil change on my own. My car is due for it's first service; 12 months with a hair under 7,000 miles, and I wish I had changed the oil earlier this year on my own. I really want to change the oil at 5,000 miles intervals, but I am not willing to pay $140 for it at the dealership to do it outside the normal 10,000 mile interval. I have a short commute to and from work; the oil likely does not even reach full operating temperature during the commute. This is hard on the oil. When car manufacturers are doing their testing and are trying to reproduce real-life scenarios, I don't think they do twice-per day commutes of just 7 miles with the speed never going above 40mph in residential areas with no highway driving, in Colorado during the summer where the daily high is in the mid-90's and the winter where it's often around 20 degrees on my way in and 35 degrees on my way home. I have a few highway trips and weekend errand trips mixed in, but mostly my drive is a commute. So I think it's a good idea to change the oil every 5,000 miles or so, as long as it costs less than $50.
 

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I'm all for doing it yourself. You seem to understand there are different levels of parts. Many people do not. We quote them whatever price for a brake job. They call Pepboys and are quoted much, much less. In their mind, they are comparing apples to apples and we are ripping them off. But if Pepboys were to use OEM parts, the savings would not be so great.

I wouldn't believe what the salesman says necessarily. $200 is nuts for a synthetic oil change. Talk to a service advisor and find out what the actual cost is. Of course, don't expect it to be what you can do it for.
 

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Can you use an oil pump to extract the oil out of the dipstick? In my other cars I got lazy and cut a hole for the oil filter to make it easier to change. I also never drain the cap. Just remove the entire assembly.
 

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No service stick?? Even bmw and Mercedes don’t have dip sticks but they have service sticks. Oh well I have a lift and first 4 years oil change is included. Thanks!
 

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Oil performs a number of important duties in a modern ICE. Think cooling, holding solids in suspension, preventing metal on metal contact to name a few. When I had my Acura 2001 NSX that I added a supercharger to I often used racing oil that was fabricated by a small company. I actually used a 0 weight racing oil for some time. It was amazing how free revving the engine was. I remember talking with the guy who formulates the oil. Obviously he made it for racing where the oil is changed often sometimes right after a racing event. He indicated that the key to good oil was its ability to prevent metal to metal contact. So the film strength was a key parameter. I used this oil for several years. The NSX was close to being a balanced engine and the tolerances were very close. I would probably not use that oil in the Volvo as I would not track the car or need it to rev that freely. Viscosity is important but there are other characteristic that effect overall performance. Changing the oil early is probably not going to affect the longevity of the engine to any great degree. Now if you are keeping it for 3 million miles than I am probably off with my statement. Generally what fails in a modern engine is not a part wearing out (bearings, camshafts, crankshafts, piston rings, piston bearings). Usually it is something that should have been replaced like a cam belt, or water pump, spark plugs, etcetera. Today's oils are superior to the ones we used in the 80s, 90s, and new millennium. Having sufficient detergents is important as well. I can recall when companies would send out oil samples for testing to determine when an oil change was necessary. It is often referred to as predictive maintenance versus preventative maintenance. Airlines and the mining industry have been doing this for decades. Moisture in the oil is a killer, which is why it is always hard on an engine when it is run on idle for a long time. It is important to get the engine up to operating temperature so that the moisture that normally is in the air does not stay in the oil. Eventually bad stuff like sulfuric acid and other chemicals form over time. I was surprised that the testing did not show the level of detergent, or the measure the ability of the oil to hold dirt in suspension (keeps it off of the metal to metal contact). We use to use chromatography paper to see how much the oil spot would spread on the paper. Acidity is really important to look at in motor oils. The color is of lesser importance. Of concern is the ability of the oil to withstand heat. As the molecules heat up and burn you lose the lubricating character of the oil. So often a oil is measured as to its ability to withstand a certain amount of heat before degrading. Lots of fun stuff. I have to think that with today's oils that 10,000 miles between changes is not a big deal. But again keeping a car to 3 million miles might change that belief.
Manny
 

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I'm all for doing it yourself. You seem to understand there are different levels of parts. Many people do not. We quote them whatever price for a brake job. They call Pepboys and are quoted much, much less. In their mind, they are comparing apples to apples and we are ripping them off. But if Pepboys were to use OEM parts, the savings would not be so great.

I wouldn't believe what the salesman says necessarily. $200 is nuts for a synthetic oil change. Talk to a service advisor and find out what the actual cost is. Of course, don't expect it to be what you can do it for.
I would probably do better to check with a mechanic for sure, but I already know that its not going to be cheap for an oil change at a Volvo dealership, and for something as simple as an oil change I will just do it myself every time. I think it was a Pepboys that quoted me $1300 to change my radiator out on my Tundra. That included the price for the part, but still. Most of those shops give you the several options to include an OEM price. To me it really depends on the part and who is making the aftermarket part to determine whether or not OEM is really the way to go. As a technician I'm sure you would never take your car in to the dealership to get an oil change, or even brakes for that matter. Those are both relatively minor jobs, with the brakes probably being a little more intimidating to those not mechanically inclined.
 

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Thank you! I think I will invest in these parts and do my next oil change on my own. My car is due for it's first service; 12 months with a hair under 7,000 miles, and I wish I had changed the oil earlier this year on my own. I really want to change the oil at 5,000 miles intervals, but I am not willing to pay $140 for it at the dealership to do it outside the normal 10,000 mile interval. I have a short commute to and from work; the oil likely does not even reach full operating temperature during the commute. This is hard on the oil. When car manufacturers are doing their testing and are trying to reproduce real-life scenarios, I don't think they do twice-per day commutes of just 7 miles with the speed never going above 40mph in residential areas with no highway driving, in Colorado during the summer where the daily high is in the mid-90's and the winter where it's often around 20 degrees on my way in and 35 degrees on my way home. I have a few highway trips and weekend errand trips mixed in, but mostly my drive is a commute. So I think it's a good idea to change the oil every 5,000 miles or so, as long as it costs less than $50.
Id say do what ever makes you comfortable, but do you have anything concrete to back up that line of thinking. I've never heard of changing the oil more often if you only make short commutes. I always assumed the reason why oil broke down was because of heat. Seems shorter commutes in a cooler climate would provide a lot less heat. Some synthetic oil and filter combos are now saying you are good up to 15k miles. Even manufactures are mostly saying 10k is the way to go even with non synthetic oils. I will probably take advantage of my free oil changes for the first 30k but after that I will likely be changing my own anywhere between 10-15k miles using synthetic. Just me personally.
 
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