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I just finished up my floorpans, which were nice and rusty thanks to a long sit in the humid northwest. I thought I'd write up my experiences using POR15 and fiberglass to fix and seal up the pans, because maybe someone can benefit from the experience I've had. Overall, I'm really happy with the result and it was fairly cheap.



If my pans were structurally compromised this wouldn't have been an option, but they weren't too bad.



1. They weren't joking when they say "soak the fiberglass cloth in the POR15." For parts of the pan I got a little lazy and tried a dab-in-place method (shown above) - cutting the cloth and painting POR15 onto it in place. DON'T DO THIS. If you do this, the fiberglass won't soak up enough POR15 to be really malleable for contoured areas and won't sit down very well. This stuff is surprisingly not very tacky, so I had a hell of a time getting some of it to sit down properly. I'd recommend using a shallow but wide disposable plastic container of some sort to make it easier to soak the cloth in. My yogurt cups were great for painting but lousy for soaking.

2. Get LOTS of cheap little brushes to paint it on. I ended up going through at least 10, but I also did this over 3 days rather than in one shot.

3. Try to do it all in one shot. See above.



4. Overall, to do the majority of my pans (but not the trans tunnel), I used about 5/6th of a pint for two coats and at least 10 small fiberglass patches (biggest was 3"x4" which covered several small holes in the same area). Not too bad but a lot was wasted. Someone smart could probably do it in 1/2 pint.

5. I'd also recommend using smaller rather than larger patches. I liked the idea of larger patches that would add rigidity to the pan, but they're so much harder to work with. I'd say to try to make them 1/2" larger than the hole around the edges.

6. I also used a very coarse fiberglass weave. I'd recommend finding a very fine one. After the first coat I could still see a lot of daylight between the fibers.



7. Lastly - how the heck do you prep the area down where the e-brake lives? I scratched my head for a while, and then decided to tape some sandpaper to my neoprene gloves. Worked pretty well! A flexible Dremmel extension might be easier, but this was cheaper!

If anyone has any questions about this, I'd be happy to answer. And next I'll be using it on some rust bubbles on the trunklid and near the rear wheel arches, and then hitting with primer and trying the very interesting rubber roller method (http://www.rickwrench.com/index79master.htm?http://www.rickwrench.com/50dollarpaint.html) to put some color-matched topcoat over it. I can't afford a full paintjob but I think I may have good results using this to do touch up.
 

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very nice. thanks for the write up. lord knows i need all the help i can get, and you just provided a big portion!

thanks again.
Glad I can be of service! No need for anyone to have to reinvent the wheel. I forgot to mention how I prepped the pans:

1. removed the tar soundproof material.
2. wirebrushed loose rust until dull and not flaky
3. removed the seam sealer if there was rust underneath it or a rust patch nearby. This was a pain in the ass. I'd recommend an angle grinder and a dremmel.
4. sanded everything by hand to rough it up with 100 grit
5. washed very thoroughly with soap and water, rinsed very well
6. I don't know if its necessary, but i used a noncholorinated brake cleaner for one last bit of cleaning/degreasing after the pan was totally dry
7. used the POR15 brand Metal Ready, 20 mins, then rinse
8. after it was BONE dry, applied the POR15. Be very careful the car is totally dry. I had a couple of small water pools I didn't notice that messed me up a few times, had to toss the small container I was using.
9. which reminds me, paint from a small cup (paper cups or yogurt containers or something). the water will ruin the POR15, so better it ruins a tiny amount than the whole $30 pint.

Seemed to work pretty well for me.
 

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I should mention that I found out that apparently spray-on carpet glue can eat through POR15, so I went ahead and shelled out for the POR15 Self-Etching Primer. It's bloody expensive ($30/spray can) but I only needed one can to do my pans. After it dried, about 30 minutes, I topcoated with two coats of Rustoleum. That took about a can and a quarter to do. I feel a lot better about it so I'd recommend anyone doing this to just factor the primer and topcoat into the cost of doing the project.

It also seems like thinning and using a spray gun would be a lot more economical for both the POR15 paint and the primer, so if money's tight and you have a cheapo spray gun, I'd go that route.
 

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I used similiar approach with fiberglass and Rust Bullet instead of POR-15, and used the 'tack-down, paint-over' approach instead of soaking prior to application...happy with the results in the areas I put it down, but did use up a lot of my paint. And I agree that the course weave fiberglass should not be used..I think I would use the woven fiberglass if I did it again and pre-soak the cloth. As well, I would order 2x or at a minimum of 1.5x the amount of paint I think I need.

Overall was happy with the Rust Bullet. Applied 2 coats of their silver Automotive product with a topcoat of the black...you can see the first 2 coats in this thread:

http://forums.swedespeed.com/showthread.php?172623-Sound-Dampening-Control
 
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