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I have two Volvo's. Mine an XC60 t6 and the wife's an XC90, both are 2012. Since the 60 is lighter I am thinking about getting snow tires and wheel. Currently they have an all season Michelin and and we've only experienced how well the 90 handles in the snow. Would love to hear your thoughts out there.

I called our dealership and their prices for tire and wheel package were about double if not more than what I could get at tire rack. Plus, tire rack had way better quality.

Thanks!!!
 

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I have an S 60 R and switch to all snow tires in the winter. It's so nice having the AWD and 4 snows when the white stuff is flying. Now if this winter is like last, well you could get by with your present setup.
If you decide to go with snows and wheels, go the Tire Rack route. Best part is, they'll come mounted and ready for you to just swap out at the first sign of the white stuff.
 

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Automobile had a great article and comparison of this topic in the Nov. '12 issue.

They took a Dodge Challenger and put All-Season tires, Summer tires and Winter tires on and did a braking distance test on packed snow at 20 degrees F and at 70 degrees F.

Snow tires stop (from 30 mph) in packed snow in 74 feet.
All-season stopped (from 30) in packed snow in 135 feet.
Summer tires stopped (from 30) in packed snow in 332 feet!!!

The reverse is true at 70 degrees at 70 mph, braking distances were (summer, all-season and winter) 149, 167 and 205.
Not quite as pronounced, but still important.

I think everyone understands the difference associated with stopping in 74 feet vs. 135 or 332 feet.
 

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Then there is that factor of getting going at a green light and getting the hell away for everyone. :)
 

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The issue with "no season" tires is that the compound is not designed for cold temperatures, and once you get below about 5*C or so the tires loose grip. There is some research on designing no season tires with a compound that'll work at lower temperatures, but I'm not sure that they're on the market yet, and if they are they'll be expensive.
 
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