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Some answers will resonate more, and others less. It's not about being right.
Along the same lines as, is the glass half empty or half full. o_O;)
 

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...My point is quite simply that the take rate for an expensive paint upcharge would probably be pretty low. Folks love to complain an uninspired color palette but if given the opportunity to get something interesting they probably wouldn't step up and pay what it actually costs.
I am one of those who complain about a bland palette and would pay $2-3K for a unique color. I like bright colors (currently own two in Fusion Red and a Bursting Blue). Vibrant Copper is pretty nice too :) But I do agree, most people are perfectly fine with conservative colors Volvo (and others) are offering.
 

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I am one of those who complain about a bland palette and would pay $2-3K for a unique color. I like bright colors (currently own two in Fusion Red and a Bursting Blue). Vibrant Copper is pretty nice too :) But I do agree, most people are perfectly fine with conservative colors Volvo (and others) are offering.
Because big discount is offered for those gray cars that stayed too long in dealer stock.

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Because big discount is offered for those gray cars that stayed too long in dealer stock.

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To me I'd think it would be the opposite. There's very little demand for bright colors so if a sales manager took a flyer and ordered one for inventory I bet it sits.
 
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What would happen if Volvo offered over 50 different colors as competitors, of course it is paid extra but you can choose one of over 50 different colors as well as the interior, if you are not satisfied with those standard colors
It’s not going to happen. Offering that many colors is too costly from a production standpoint. if you look back to the 1960s and 1970s, US manufacturers had numerous variants and trim levels of the same vehicle and it was truly easy to order one of a kind vehicles. Today, that is not the case and for many manufacturers, the configurations are becoming far less flexible than they were even 5 or 10 years ago. The driving force is cost cutting since fewer options means less customization, which means more efficient assembly.

The same applies to paint colors since it is more efficient to run batches of the same color through the painting process than changing colors after every car or every few cars. When I special ordered my Ford Explorer for the Fire Dept, Ford made clear that it would not be built until they had 50 vehicles of the same color since I was not using a standard Ford Explorer color.
 

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It’s not going to happen. Offering that many colors is too costly from a production standpoint. if you look back to the 1960s and 1970s, US manufacturers had numerous variants and trim levels of the same vehicle and it was truly easy to order one of a kind vehicles. Today, that is not the case and for many manufacturers, the configurations are becoming far less flexible than they were even 5 or 10 years ago. The driving force is cost cutting since fewer options means less customization, which means more efficient assembly.

The same applies to paint colors since it is more efficient to run batches of the same color through the painting process than changing colors after every car or every few cars. When I special ordered my Ford Explorer for the Fire Dept, Ford made clear that it would not be built until they had 50 vehicles of the same color since I was not using a standard Ford Explorer color.
Maybe you’re writing for Volvo, some other premium brands have it on offer
The premium brand also differs from others in terms of quality and capabilities, which they have in contrast to others

Not only the exterior colors but even the interior can be customized to your liking Of course it all depends on how much you are willing to pay for it, here are some pictures of what it looks like, of course this is just an example





Here you can see all the options and color palette

or here


Or when you have a lot more options to choose from for different wheel models rather than just one or two models
128407
 

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Maybe you’re writing for Volvo, some other premium brands have it on offer
The premium brand also differs from others in terms of quality and capabilities, which they have in contrast to others

Not only the exterior colors but even the interior can be customized to your liking Of course it all depends on how much you are willing to pay for it, here are some pictures of what it looks like, of course this is just an example





Here you can see all the options and color palette

or here


Or when you have a lot more options to choose from for different wheel models rather than just one or two models
View attachment 128407
@BigBang — I am just going from my experiences (and those of my parents) when ordering cars. You are correct that some manufacturers (such as Audi) offer much more flexibility than others. When I purchased my last Ford Fusion/Mondeo Hybrid in the 2019 model year, I had a choice of three trim levels, a handful of colors and whether or not it came with a sunroof or a block heater. And, for the Titanium trim level (the trim level I selected), there were no options Other than color and block heater. Gone were all of the package option groups and stand alone options that could make your car somewhat unique. Ford‘s rationale - cost savings.

Historically, Volvo’s offerings for the US have been much less flexible than the offerings for Europe. When my parents purchased their Volvo sedan through the military sales program in Europe, the only options were whether or not it had air conditioning, an auto or manual transmission and a radio. Of course floor mats and headrest covers were available. And, had it been a wagon, a roof rack would have been possible.

Starting with the 242GT and Beretone coupes, it seems as though Volvo started branching out and you started seeing more offerings in the US. This eventually translated into being able to get more choice. As an example, for my 1990 240 DL, the available selections were sunroof, transmission and color. In that car, heated seats and air conditioning and cruise control were standard. There was of course a GL variant, but I am not familiar with its details since I did not purchase it. My recollection is that the color pallets were more flexible, but that seemingly changed sometime during the 2000s, presumably because production methods changed. Again, I presume that Volvo, like some other OEMs, are trying to streamline production methods in order to increase efficiency and reduce cost.
 

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@BigBang — I am just going from my experiences (and those of my parents) when ordering cars. You are correct that some manufacturers (such as Audi) offer much more flexibility than others. When I purchased my last Ford Fusion/Mondeo Hybrid in the 2019 model year, I had a choice of three trim levels, a handful of colors and whether or not it came with a sunroof or a block heater. And, for the Titanium trim level (the trim level I selected), there were no options Other than color and block heater. Gone were all of the package option groups and stand alone options that could make your car somewhat unique. Ford‘s rationale - cost savings.

Historically, Volvo’s offerings for the US have been much less flexible than the offerings for Europe. When my parents purchased their Volvo sedan through the military sales program in Europe, the only options were whether or not it had air conditioning, an auto or manual transmission and a radio. Of course floor mats and headrest covers were available. And, had it been a wagon, a roof rack would have been possible.

Starting with the 242GT and Beretone coupes, it seems as though Volvo started branching out and you started seeing more offerings in the US. This eventually translated into being able to get more choice. As an example, for my 1990 240 DL, the available selections were sunroof, transmission and color. In that car, heated seats and air conditioning and cruise control were standard. There was of course a GL variant, but I am not familiar with its details since I did not purchase it. My recollection is that the color pallets were more flexible, but that seemingly changed sometime during the 2000s, presumably because production methods changed. Again, I presume that Volvo, like some other OEMs, are trying to streamline production methods in order to increase efficiency and reduce cost.
I absolutely understand you but my comment is that if you want to be a premium brand, then you have to offer what others in that category have.
I don't know about American cars, I have no experience with them because they are rare in the EU market. My comment refers to EU companies.
One example is Toyota in the EU market, there are a lot of people who are potential customers, but Toyota offers only three equipment packages and no additional options which is a big minus for many potential customers.

Everyone in the automotive industry wants to save and make production costs lower, but if you want to be a premium brand, you can't abolish everything and say it's to save money, to make production cheaper.

One of the disappointments from Volvo is that they stopped producing folding rear seat 40/20/40 , leaving only the 60/40 option (cheaper production)
 

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To be fair, limited equipment packages is a side effect of many included features. Porsche is infamous for their meticulous options, but it's possible to buy a Macan without keyless starting. I have a family member with a new Jaguar F-pace with no cruise control...

(insert timeless bigbang apples/oranges comment here)

The color customizations that Porsche has is nifty but for an average, non-enthusiast buyer (which the Macan and Volvo models appeal to), I don't know that the business case for bespoke colors is compelling. Would more colors be good? Sure, why not? Does a brand HAVE to match VAGs offering of colors to be successful? Lol no and sales data shows this. So your word choice of a premium brand 'has to' match their competition is misleading and matches the opinion of a very small group of people. I get your inclination to whine about anything possible but don't make other members think you're about to make an intelligent argument and leave them hanging ;)
 
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