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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Special Tools: Crank Pulley Counterhold Tool (Volvo part #: 999543)
(or make your own like I did....see pic below)

First, remove the front right wheel and inner fender liner as best as you can. It is riveted on, so I just removed the two inner 10mm nuts and moved the liner out of the way as needed. (Believe me, you will begin swearing at this thing at some point during the process).



Remove the upper timing cover by removing the two T25 Torx screws.



Remove the side timing cover by removing the 10mm bolt in the side.



Now...I am going to go against the Volvo procedure because, let's be honest, my way makes much more sense. Volvo has you remove the timing belt from the cam gears and tensioner before removing the crank pulley. This is a pretty silly mistake because if the cams are in a set position without the belt attached, and you turn the crank too far by accident while trying to remove the nut, you risk damaging the valves. So I wait to remove the timing belt until the crank pulley is off. This can be a very difficult procedure as the nut usually gets frozen on the crank. I recommend two coats of PB blast with 5 minutes in between. As you can see, I made my own tool to secure to 2 of the 4 10mm bolts on the crank pulley. This "locks" the pulley in place. You will need a 30mm socket to remove the center nut from the crank pulley. I recommend using an impact socket for this (I did not have one, nor did the local sears, so I ended up using a 12-point 30mm socket against my better judgement). Using a 2' breaker bar and a lot of cursing, it finally broke free.



There is a much easier method that I have used in the past and ended up using on my girlfriend's S40 yesterday because I didn't want to go through the pain of removing that nut again. You don't need the counterhold tool or a makeshift one. You just need to ensure that the timing belt is still connected, place the socket with breaker bar on the nut so that the arm of the breaker bar is at the 4 or 5 o'clock position resting on the ground. After you are satisfied that it is secure, go in the car and "BUMP" the engine. DO NOT LET IT START!!!!! If successful, you will hear a bang which will be the breaker bar and socket falling to the floor. The torque from the starter motor turns the engine while the breaker bar keeps the nut locked in position, and it frees the nut. You can then use a regular socket wrench to pull it off. Now make sure all 4 10mm bolts are removed from the crank pulley.

You then need to remove the serpentine belt. The tensioner is loosened with a Torx Bit (T50 maybe??) that you turn clockwise; however I did not have one of these so I had to improvise (don't ask). With the serpentine belt off, you can begin working the pulley off. I used a long screwdriver and rubber mallet and just kept tapping from the backside. Again, PB blaster is your friend. It took me about 20 minutes to free this up (It came off immediately on my girlfriends S40T5 with 95k miles, so its a hit or miss). With the pulley off, you can see the timing mark much more clearly on the crank timing pulley. Re-install the nut that holds the crank pulley on as you can use this to turn the engine to Top-Dead-Center.



With the engine timed properly, you can loosen the 12mm bolt that holds the tensioner in place, but DO NOT REMOVE IT. Then, using a 6mm allen key, turn the eccentric to the 10 o'clock position which removes all tension from the belt.



The belt then slides off the pulley. Remove it in clock-wise order starting with the belt tensioner.



With the belt off, remove the 12mm bolt from the tensioner and remove/replace the tensioner. Make sure the eccentric is at the 10 o'clock position on the new tensioner before installing it. Remove the 2 10mm bolts that hold the idler pulley in place and remove/replace the idler pulley. This would also be the time that you remove/replace the water pump if you are going to do so. I chose to wait until my next timing belt change at 150k miles before doing the water pump because it is unnecessary at this point. With the new components installed, install the new timing belt. Make sure it is looped around the crank timing pulley and the belt is secured in the cogs. Then work the belt around the idler pulley and up over the intake cam pulley, then across the exhaust cam pulley, then on the water pump and finally slide it on the belt tensioner. It should barely slide on the final pulley. At this point, verify your timing marks are still in the correct position. In this position, the intake camshaft can move very easily (I had to re-adjust mine before finalizing the belt posiiton). If all marks line up, use your 6mm allen key to increase the tension by turning it clockwise until the indicator in position correctly. On a room temperature engine, the tensioner indicator should be set to the 12 o'clock position. On a warm engine, set it closer to the 1 o'clock position.



After putting tension on the belt, press on the belt between the two cam pulleys and also between the exhaust cam and water pump and ensure that there is not excess slack. If you're good, then put the 30mm socket on a socket wrench and slowly turn the engine through TWO revolutions and ensure that all the timing marks are still aligned. If they are, torque the 12mm tensioner bolt to 24ft-lb. Make sure the indicator is still at the desired position.

Everything else should simply be a reversal of the removal process. Once it's all back together, take the car for a quick drive and verify that everything seems normal.
If I missed anything or you need clarification, let me know and I'll add it.
 

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Awesome! I would have sent you my pictures that a few members sent me but it looks like you nailed it with your how-to. Excellent post Matt.

My input/experience w/ regards to my timing belt replacement: What DrBrutal and I did for extra precaution is we marked up everything - two cam shafts and the crank, to something nearby so we could make sure nothing moved even the slightest bit when we took the old belt on or put the new belt on. This part is the MOST IMPORTANT. One tooth off and your engine is completely out of sync. We did it 2 or 3 times before we got it on properly with everything lined up. In all honesty, this is not a very difficult install, even if it is a European vehicle. Shops charging $500+ in labor are out of their minds. We got it done, got pizza, ate pizza, checked to make sure we were doing it all correctly, and got done with everything in maybe 3 hours. Having someone helping you also makes life much easier. Maybe meet up with another member and do timing belts together?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I had the long-forked tensioner as my original but received the smaller one with the kit from FCP. It installed fine, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Awesome! I would have sent you my pictures that a few members sent me but it looks like you nailed it with your how-to. Excellent post Matt.

My input/experience w/ regards to my timing belt replacement: What DrBrutal and I did for extra precaution is we marked up everything - two cam shafts and the crank, to something nearby so we could make sure nothing moved even the slightest bit when we took the old belt on or put the new belt on. This part is the MOST IMPORTANT. One tooth off and your engine is completely out of sync. We did it 2 or 3 times before we got it on properly with everything lined up. In all honesty, this is not a very difficult install, even if it is a European vehicle. Shops charging $500+ in labor are out of their minds. We got it done, got pizza, ate pizza, checked to make sure we were doing it all correctly, and got done with everything in maybe 3 hours. Having someone helping you also makes life much easier. Maybe meet up with another member and do timing belts together?
Thanks!
Yes, I should mention that it will save you some headache if you make your own timing marks too. The original marks on the cam pulleys are very poor.
 

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I had the long-forked tensioner as my original but received the smaller one with the kit from FCP. It installed fine, though.
where's the facepalm emoticon... :facepalm: There it is... Really? You'd go and install the wrong part knowingly? You sir, have failed.

I want you to take a picture of your installed wrong tensioner, to be sure you're not screwing yourself over. If I recall, from when I tried to, the fitament was not right, and it couldn't reach the boss on the block that holds it's clocking. If you're in the same boat, your tensioner will creep and loosen your belt over time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I can confirm that the tensioner is installed correctly. The fork fits over the rib on the block keeping its clocked position. The only way it would loosen is the same as any other tensioner....if the 12mm bolt backed itself out. But with loctite thread-locker and proper torque, I don't see that happening. :)

To put your condescending remarks back in the bag, I'll gladly post a picture so others don't have to worry about installing the wrong part. The 2004-2007 blocks have the same rib, so you are correct with either tensioner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
As promised here is the shot showing the different style tensioner fitting securely over the rib on the block, as designed. Moral of the story: either tensioner will work just fine.
 

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hard to see, but at least you looked at it and it lines up with the belt.
I still don't agree that either tensioner will work on 04-07. I can't recall perfectly, but when I tried the small tensioner, the depth on the back was wrong and the teeth wouldn't reach the alignment boss.
 

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Nice write up :thumbup: If only you did this a week ago when I did mine :facepalm:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I didn't touch the seals this time, but will definitely do the cam seals at 150k and will inspect crank (FMS) at that time, too.
Question for you guys...why do we have adjustable cam pulleys?

JoJo: maybe the newer style won't work on the 2004-2005, but this style definitely works on all 4 as it locks in place with the inability to change clock position. Sorry for the crappy iPhone quality. I was using my LED flashlight and that was the best lighting I could get.
 

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Another epically good how-to post. Where do these things keep coming from?? Either way, keep them coming!

Ps I love the technique for breaking the bolt...very Volvo-compliant of you :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
If anyone ever has doubt about using the "starter method" for breaking the nut free, I'd be happy to post a how-to video on it. :)
 

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If anyone ever has doubt about using the "starter method" for breaking the nut free, I'd be happy to post a how-to video on it. :)
+1 just to be able to play back the bang as many times as I want to.
 

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How much is that Pulley Counterhold Tool from volvo and can a generic tool be used?
 

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Phuz question for you. Do you where this goes?



For some reason I can't recall where this goes, It was pretty dirty when I took it out, I cleaned it up a bit and attempted different positions near the crank pulley, but no luck. So its is now sitting in my garage :facepalm:
 

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Phuz question for you. Do you where this goes?
For some reason I can't recall where this goes, It was pretty dirty when I took it out, I cleaned it up a bit and attempted different positions near the crank pulley, but no luck. So its is now sitting in my garage :facepalm:
CJ, it looks like part #20. And from what I can see, it is located outside the timing belt cover (bottom left).



And I think you can see it in this picture:

 

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OOOOH, Thanks Darek! Good looking out :thumbup:
 
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