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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am brand new to the Volvo community having just purchased my '67 122S 2 door automatic a couple of months ago. My 122 had some issues to begin with, and some more have popped up since, but it's been fun to fix the problems along the way with my 16-year-old son.

One issue that we have not been able to resolve is getting the AT into reverse after the car has been idle for an hour or more. We can get it into Drive and Low right away, but it will not engage into reverse. Once we let it sit in L or D for 10 seconds or so, we can shift it into reverse and it will engage. If the car has been driven and then parked for an hour or less, we can usually get it into reverse right away.

Transmission fluid looks clean and it is full. Has anyone else experienced this behavior with their automatic before? If so, is there a resolution other than a complete rebuild?

Also, we put some new window scraper rubber (from IPD) on the doors this weekend. The passenger side window will roll up and down just fine, but the driver's side window wants to bind with the window scraper rubber on the way down. If the window is wet, it will roll up and down with no issues. IPD suggested putting Rain-X on the rubber to reduce the friction with the glass. Any other ideas?

Thanks!
 

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I am brand new to the Volvo community having just purchased my '67 122S 2 door automatic a couple of months ago. My 122 had some issues to begin with, and some more have popped up since, but it's been fun to fix the problems along the way with my 16-year-old son.

One issue that we have not been able to resolve is getting the AT into reverse after the car has been idle for an hour or more. We can get it into Drive and Low right away, but it will not engage into reverse. Once we let it sit in L or D for 10 seconds or so, we can shift it into reverse and it will engage. If the car has been driven and then parked for an hour or less, we can usually get it into reverse right away.

Transmission fluid looks clean and it is full. Has anyone else experienced this behavior with their automatic before? If so, is there a resolution other than a complete rebuild?

Also, we put some new window scraper rubber (from IPD) on the doors this weekend. The passenger side window will roll up and down just fine, but the driver's side window wants to bind with the window scraper rubber on the way down. If the window is wet, it will roll up and down with no issues. IPD suggested putting Rain-X on the rubber to reduce the friction with the glass. Any other ideas?

Thanks!
Welcome to Swedespeed, Jeff.

The Borg-Warner T-35 automatic transmission in your '67 P132 is easy to maintain and many problems can be fixed by a full service to include band adjustment.

Also, the linkage grommets have a tendency to deteriorate which, along with out-of-adjustment, can cause shifting problems. This includes the shift lever's interaction with the linkage at the steering wheel.

To clarify your problem - the shift lever will go into R anytime but the transmission will not shift into R under certain circumstances - is this correct?

Does the starter inhibitor switch function properly? Will the starter engage in P and N only?

Look closely at the shift linkage under the hood and note that it has threaded/nut adjustment on some ends of each linkage rod including near the transmission.

Once you have safely raised the car disconnect the linkage at the transmission which will allow you to change gears at the transmission without moving the linkage to the shift lever.

Move the transmission into the R position then shift the lever into the R position at the steering wheel.

Replace the linkage without moving the shift lever from the R position or the R position at the transmission. This will require you to loosen/retighten the adjusting nuts along the linkage to get everything to fit.

If one (or more) components of the linkage is worn/damaged this procedure will not remedy the shift problem.

While you are still under the car adjust the starter inhibitor switch to allow starter engagement in P or N only.

As to the window scrapers - do they have a specific orientation on the door or fit on either door and in any direction?

George Dill
 

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They have a rubber bead that "snaps" into a matching channel formed by a stainless strip spotwelded to the inside of the door. I think the Rain-X idea is a good one. Oiling the mechanism that the window crank fastens to may also help. While you are inside the door look for rust on the channel that grips the bottom of the glass. I've had some of them rust out (because of missing/damaged window scrapers).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the responses on the transmission and the window scraper issues! I'm not sure if my transmission problem is linkage-related. It's almost as if the transmission just needs time to build up pressure before it will shift into reverse. Yesterday, after the car had sat in my parking lot at work for four hours, I started it up and put the shift lever into the R position. I waited for about 15 seconds and then finally the transmission engaged into reverse gear. As I mentioned in my first post, up until yesterday, after starting up the car I usually put the shift lever into D or L first (which only take a second or two to engage the transmission), then waited about 10 seconds before shifting into reverse - that would work every time. Yesterday was the first time I shifted into R first and just waited it out. So like I said, it's as if something needs to build up pressure before the transmission will go into reverse. If I drive to the grocery store and park it, and then come back 15 minutes later, I can start the car and get it into reverse right away. It's just after those extended periods of sitting that it doesn't like to get into reverse right away.

I've had my son call me from school a couple of times saying they could not start the Volvo and in both cases, he just did not have the car in P. When in P, the knob of the shift lever rests up against the dash - not sure if that is normal or not. I will look at both the linkage and the started inhibitor switch this weekend anyway just to rule them out.

The window scrapers were purchased from IPD and installed last weekend. My old ones were dried up and cracked along their entire length. The scrapers came in a package of two - both identical, so I don't think they are specific to one side of the car or the other. At first I thought they sent the wrong scrapers, because they were flat - meaning that once I got the rubber bead to snap into the groove, the scraper portion of the rubber was laying horizontally instead of standing up like the original ones did (so either the old ones were petrified in the standing position or the new ones needed some Viagra). I used some liquid soap to get the beads to snap into the channels and then trimmed the ends to length.

My passenger side scraper works fine, the drivers side rubber sticks to the glass like it has Spiderman super powers. I tried the Rain-X last night but it didn't work. The thing I really noticed was how much more sticky the rubber feels on the driver's side than on the passenger side. I can drag my finger along the passenger side scraper and it just glides along. On the driver's side, my finger won't glide at all - it just keep binding. The driver's side rubber even looks wetter than the passenger side. I tried using alcohol and paint thinner to "remove the stickiness" to no avail. I even tried Windex on it thinking that the ammonia might help dry it up, but no dice. Maybe they sent me a defective piece that hadn't cured completely at the factory - I don't know. I think I will give it a few days to dry up in the hot Iowa sun, unless anyone else has another idea.

Thanks,

Jeff
 

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Indeed, a band adjustment should fix the R problem in the T-35. (edit - Walrus, does this transmission have an internal pump?)

That the shift lever hits the dash when in P is an indication of possible worn components in the mechanism.

If the car won't readily start in P wiggle the lever while (carefully) engaging the starter or shift to N (may still require a wiggle).

Window scraper - try a few passes with fine sandpaper then tell us how you managed to avoid getting the grit down in the...

Does the car have the original ignition key and switch?

George Dill
 

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Below is a lengthy paste from the Brickboard concerning BW T-35 fixes.

Also, these cars prefer to have the kickdown cable properly adjusted.

George Dill

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BW T-35 automatic transmission troubleshooting – from the Brickboard.
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Jake -- I've e-mailed you with some scanned pages from a repair manual. I'd post them here if I wasn't so inept at that sort of thing. The illustration for the external adjustment makes it look really simple by neglecting to show the floorpan. Nevertheless, the lock nut and adjuster are reachable. Loosen the locknut and make sure it's free on the adjuster-back it off at least a couple of turns. Turn the adjuster screw in (there is a specific torque but absent a proper torque wrench, if you grasp the ratchet near the head and use your wrist to turn the screw in till it stops without using excessive force, you'll be ok). Back off the screw 1 turn and set the lock nut. The illustration for the adjustment within the pan doesn't say what to do---turn in the adjusting screw for the forward band till it leaves you with 1/8 inch clearance when pulled back with your fingers. While you’re in there put a 9/16 socket on the two screws that hold the reverse servo--they often loosen up. If you're really ambitious remove the two screws and lower the pivot--remove the flat piston to replace the O ring that goes around its perimeter--the two most common faults when reverse engagement is slow or non-existent. LOL--the old meaning of Lots of Luck – Dave
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No one as yet has suggested two things to check. There's an internal drum that's held in place by two set screws (3/8ths shank, 9/16th bolt head, if memory serves). They are located at mid point on the transmission case at around 2-3 o'clock and 9-10 o'clock. Make sure they are tight. The other thing is the band adjustment that's done externally--look under the floor mat on the tunnel, right side, for a rubber plug. Under the plug you'll see a set screw with a lock nut (11/16 or maybe 3/4). The adjustment involves loosening the lock nut and turning in the adjusting screw a set amount in inch-pounds--I don't recall the specific amount but it isn't a lot--the idea is to put a pre-load on the tab of the band--and then tighten the lock nut. These items are not easy to reach with the tranny in the car--but doable. The other band adjustment is done from inside the pan with a set screw on a lever. This band will effect reverse engagement and aside from the adjustment the other problem related to it is the bolts for the aluminum bracket for the lever sometimes loosen. Some folks trash talk the BW35 and they are right that it can often take away from an otherwise excellent car but I have owned a few that worked very well--my daughter still laments selling the 1971 144S I found for her as a first car, to drive the '67 Barracuda we spent a summer rebuilding. It took her 3 months to get bored with the Barracuda and in its stead I found a '68 144S. A nice car but not nearly as spunky as the '71. Good luck with your project.
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Success on the reverse band adjustment. It was pretty simple. There is a rubber plug under the floor mats, passenger side of drive shaft tunnel that is removed to access the adjuster from inside the car. There is a 3/4" lock nut and a 5/16" square drive adjuster. I loosened the jamb nut and tightened the adjuster to 10 foot pounds, backed off one turn then re-tightened the jamb nut. Reverse works great.
The funny part is that I spotted the plug from under the car after I had already removed the tranny pan...a messy task. Live and learn.
Phred 1
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It depends on the age of the car. On 2 door cars with chassis #93547 and 4 door with 170430 onwards there is a rubber plug in the body tunnel.
The adjuster is on the right hand side of the box facing upwards.
Slacken the locknut, tighten the adjuster to 10lb/ft, back off one turn, and re-tighten lock nut.
Pete (who just cribbed this from the factory manual)
Incidentally no drive in reverse, or engine braking in L1 (there is engine braking in reverse) Means the rear band is not operating.
No drive in reverse, or engine braking in L1. Takes off in second in D and L Means 1-2 shift valve seized open.
Slip, judder squawk on takeoff in R possibly affecting D3 Means rear clutch plates worn or low pressure.
No R or judder in R Means seized or partially seized front clutch
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No problem. After checking my '75 240 service manual at home, the automatic 3-speed Borg Warner 35 was equipped on the 1975 Volvo 240 along with the B20 engine (both were a carryover from the 144 vehicles). Just in case someone does stumble across this post and is looking for information on adjusting their BW35, here's the procedure. (Anybody reading this who has a BW55 or an AW70/71 can disregard this post since your transmission does not have bands.)
From inside the car, remove the mats (carpet) from the transmission tunnel and also the air duct (that runs over top of the hole to access the band adjustment). Remove the rubber plug to gain access through the floor board of the vehicle to the Rear Brake Band Adjustment on top of the BW35 transmission. Using Volvo tool 999-5042, loosen the locking nut (outside nut of the adjustment interface). Torque the inner screw of the adjustment interface to 10 ft-lbs (aka 14 Nm), then back off the adjusting screw one complete turn. Tighten the outer lock nut to secure the screw in its position and replace all the components you removed to gain access. Volvo advises performing this service / adjustment on the BW 35 transmission every 30,000 miles.
If you happen to have Volvo Tool 5042, the process is quite easy. The tool has provisions at the top (and through the shaft of the tool) for a torque wrench and thus allows tightening the adjustment screw while the outside of the tool holds the locknut from turning until it's time to secure it. If you don't have access to the 5042 tool (works the inner adjustment screw and the outer lock nut at the same time), the Volvo special socket SVO 2535 is the proper socket for your torque wrench to mate to the adjustment screw (for working the inner adjustment screw by itself).
Fitz Fitzgerald.
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To answer your questions regarding the BW35--they are all basically the same but for some minor differences. The 122's and early 140's had a longer tailshaft section and are air cooled (there's no trans cooler built into the radiator--instead the torque converter has cooling fins) -- that's the major change. At some point the position of the neutral safety/reverse light switch was changed - minor. One problem area of the 35 is the reverse band servo - easily accessed after removing the pan - problem # one - the "O" ring around the servo piston can wear out/tear leaving you with no reverse--problem # 2 - the two 3/8ths inch dia. bolts securing the actuating lever loosen, again, leaving you with slow/or no reverse engagement. The 35 is a sturdy enough unit behind a 4 cylinder (164's with the 35 experience far more trans problems despite their beefed up clutches) and was used by many British cars (BMC/BLMC, Rootes and Rover to name a few). Be sure to use the proper "F" type fluid.
--
End.
 

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I have NO experience with the BW35 trannies - have never owned on and don't plan to. Koping and Volvo made some of the finest trannies of their day and replacing them with a lackluster US generic auto tranny degrades the marque, in my view.

I would NOT sandpaper the window scraper. If you get grit stuck to it it will scratch your window!! Might try some chalk dust or tire talc though. Or you MIGHT complain to IPD and see if they will replace it with one that is not degraded. They get that way when they are old.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
We finally had a break from the heat here in Iowa where I was able to get back on work on my transmission issue. I pulled back the carpet on the passenger side and found the access hole to the band adjustment on top of the transmission. I loosened the lock nut with a 3/4 in deep socket and then used an 8 point 5/16" socket to tighten the adjuster bolt to 10 ft-lbs. Then I loosened it about a turn and tightened down the lock nut again. Let the car sit overnight and still it took about 15 seconds for the car to engage into reverse. So, that did not solve my problem. So I wonder if I need to drop the pan and look into the reverse band servo and check the "O" ring around the servo piston for wear and then check the bolts securing the actuating lever to see if they are loose.

Another thing I noticed about the transmission is that it always seems like I am in second gear when in the D position. If I drop it into L, I can definitely tell that it is in 1st gear because of the engine revving when I get to around 20 mph. While in D, I never feel any gear shifts - from 0 all the way through 65 mph. No revving at low speeds, which tells me I'm in second gear. Is this normal? When should it normally shift into 3rd gear?

Concerning the window scraper issue: they still stick to the glass too tightly causing the windows to bind against them when I roll them down. All the things I have tried (RainX, talc, silicone spray, light sanding) all work temporarily until the window seal gets wet again, either from rain or humidity (plenty of that here in Iowa). I think I will call IPD and ask for an exchange.

Thanks,

Jeff
 

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By design, the AT in your 122 does indeed start in second gear from a stop when the shift lever shows D.

That you cannot feel a shift into D is another indication of possible internal problems.

Try this (safely) - from a stop on an empty flat paved Iowa section road (any other kind?) and with the car in D press the gas pedal down hard and firm to the floor and hang on.

Just keep the pedal to the metal and note the shifts if any.

But, officer, this guy on Swedespeed said to...

Now let's do this again but this time pull the lever into L from a stop then let 'er rip.

Don't lift the gas pedal even with the engine screaming just shift one detent "up" and note any shifts.

Keep this up until the next detent is N then lift off the gas pedal.

You can't hurt the Volvo B18B engine - during development the engineers ran it 24 hours at massive rpms - no measurable wear!

Back to reality - for the AT to work properly all shift linkage and bushings must be in order and properly adjusted including the kickdown cable.

After a hot run pull the dipstick then inspect, feel and smell the AT fluid. Gritty? Burnt? Dirty? Is this the same AT fluid as when you bought the car?

George Dill
 

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Now, please beware that I have never driven or owned a Volvo auto. However, I have owned and driven extensively other vehicles from that era with 3 sp automatic, and there are certainly many similarities. (in fact, I was a bit surprised that they are supposed to start on 2nd on D, I guess a setting good for snow and ice).

As George said, the shift to 3rd is most likely supposed to happen at very low speed if you are not accelerating hard. My guess is that as low as 35 or 40, you should be in 3rd if not driving too hard.

Again, as George said, there is always a linkage between your throttle and the transmission, so that the transmission "knows" how hard you are accelerating (some vehicles may have had vacuum input from the engine to the gearbox, but yours is probably not so). When the throttle is depressed, the transmission holds the low gear longer (and also maintains higher internal oil pressure). An improper linkage adjustment could send the wrong signal to the transmission, making it "think" that you are accelerating, when in reality you are not. It could be as simple as a spring improper installation that can cause the transmission to hold low gear longer than it should. So, this problem, may be very simple to resolve. Also, note that you can mess up this linkage the opposite way, and make the transmission "think" that you are accelerating slower than you really are. That can make the transmission shift sooner, and maintain reduced internal oil pressure (which can lead to slippage and accelerated transmission wear). So, proper linkage adjustment is important, even though it is very simple, once you figured it out. You also need to fix this problem, otherwise you may get very low fuel economy.

The reverse issue is entirely different, and sounds more difficult. But you may be able to live with it for a while, until the gearbox completely gives.

If you have to rebuild this transmission, you may want to consider a conversion to manual. They work better, improve performance and economy, and make driving more fun.
 

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I am brand new to the Volvo community having just purchased my '67 122S 2 door automatic a couple of months ago. My 122 had some issues to begin with, and some more have popped up since, but it's been fun to fix the problems along the way with my 16-year-old son.

One issue that we have not been able to resolve is getting the AT into reverse after the car has been idle for an hour or more. We can get it into Drive and Low right away, but it will not engage into reverse. Once we let it sit in L or D for 10 seconds or so, we can shift it into reverse and it will engage. If the car has been driven and then parked for an hour or less, we can usually get it into reverse right away.

Transmission fluid looks clean and it is full. Has anyone else experienced this behavior with their automatic before? If so, is there a resolution other than a complete rebuild?

Also, we put some new window scraper rubber (from IPD) on the doors this weekend. The passenger side window will roll up and down just fine, but the driver's side window wants to bind with the window scraper rubber on the way down. If the window is wet, it will roll up and down with no issues. IPD suggested putting Rain-X on the rubber to reduce the friction with the glass. Any other ideas?

Thanks!
Back again - and just read this whole mess again...

http://volvoamazonpictures.se/documents/sevice_manuals/BW35MANUAL.pdf

...since I last read the whole mess back in '87 for my '67 144S with same AT.

Looking through the troubleshooting charts it seems much time/effort/money may be saved by FIRST doing a full fluid change and service on the transmission.

Following much research on the specified fluid (Type A/Suffix A) as called for by the factory manual here is the current correct fluid...

http://www.autozone.com/autozone/ac...ion-fluid/_/N-25aa?itemIdentifier=516918_0_0_

...same being Valvoline/DEXRON III/Mercon (eleven pints).

Since the rear band (which controls R) has now been adjusted with no change in the R engagement problem and since the transmission must be lowered from the car to adjust the front band (which has no affect on R) consider doing a full service and fluid change as descibed in the manual before dropping the trans.

George Dill
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I went to Autozone today and bought a tachometer for my 122S. I thought of mounting it on top of the dash like on the 123GT, but having just replaced the dash cover, I thought it best to mount it under the heater controls on the dash for now. It went in easily and works wonderfully.

I took George's advice and put the pedal to the metal as I inched up the ramp to I-80. I gave it all she had from 0 all the way to 70 or so. It never shifted. RPM's reached 3500 - 4000 and were sustained there all the way through the 2 mile stretch before the ramp I exited on.

Based on the shop manual for the AT, it would appear to me that there should be a 1st gear, 2nd, and 3rd while in D. Did I miss where it said it was designed to start in 2nd while in D?

When you say to perform a full service and change the fluid, what other tasks should be performed besides the fluid change? Thanks for the correct type and capacity.

I will read up on the linkage between the throttle and the transmission. That makes good sense and could very well be the problem.

Out of curiosity, is it pretty easy to find a working manual transmission for the 122? What would the total cost be for the manual transmission and all the necessary support parts to perform the conversion? Just want to get a ballpark figure to compare with any suggested work from the transmission shop to get the automatic working again.

Thanks again for all your help and suggestions!

Jeff
 

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I went to Autozone today and bought a tachometer for my 122S. I thought of mounting it on top of the dash like on the 123GT, but having just replaced the dash cover, I thought it best to mount it under the heater controls on the dash for now. It went in easily and works wonderfully.

I took George's advice and put the pedal to the metal as I inched up the ramp to I-80. I gave it all she had from 0 all the way to 70 or so. It never shifted. RPM's reached 3500 - 4000 and were sustained there all the way through the 2 mile stretch before the ramp I exited on.

Based on the shop manual for the AT, it would appear to me that there should be a 1st gear, 2nd, and 3rd while in D. Did I miss where it said it was designed to start in 2nd while in D?

When you say to perform a full service and change the fluid, what other tasks should be performed besides the fluid change? Thanks for the correct type and capacity.

I will read up on the linkage between the throttle and the transmission. That makes good sense and could very well be the problem.

Out of curiosity, is it pretty easy to find a working manual transmission for the 122? What would the total cost be for the manual transmission and all the necessary support parts to perform the conversion? Just want to get a ballpark figure to compare with any suggested work from the transmission shop to get the automatic working again.

Thanks again for all your help and suggestions!

Jeff
What does the new tach show at warm idle?

Your I-80 blast at the on-ramp began with the trans already in third gear. Flooring the pedal should have caused a downshift unless the car was above a certain speed. Repeat this safely on a back road but begin at a full stop with the trans in L then shift up only when you can't handle the 5,000+ rpms. On the upshift the trans should go directly to third gear.

The pdf manual lists the work to perform during maintenence procedures.

Note the instructions for adjusting the kickdown cable. My experiences tell me to adjust the cable as tightly as possible but not so tight as to be causing movement to the mechanism. Be sure the cable is not stretched beyond adjustability.

Converting your Amazon from AT to M41 4-speed with overdrive would make for an all-different ride indeed. For those with intense mechanical skills buying and rebuilding cheap donor units is the way to fly. Next level of expenditure is locating both units in unknown condition and take a chance. If dollars are no problem you can get a ready-to-bolt-in M41/OD for just under $3,000 then hire out the labor to a skilled tech at $125/hour.

George Dill

http://www.vclassics.com/archive/odconv.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The tach speed, while in D, is around 500 - 600 rpms. Let me know what it should be. It jumps up to 800 - 900 when I have the car in P.

Last night I made some progress, I think. I read the specific section of the manual (adjusting the downshift valve cable). I'm assuming this is the cable that is attached to the throttle linkage towards the firewall side of the engine compartment. This cable goes down to the transmission. Indeed, there was a LOT of slack on the throttle linkage end. I removed the slack as described in the manual on page 4-16, section A (although I don't know if I have the necessary tools to measure the line pressure as described in A.3.b. It is pretty close to the point where I don't have the ability to take out much more slack.

I took it for a drive and now I definitely feel (and see via the tach) a shift occurring when I am somewhere between 2500 and 3000 rpms (at about 35 mph). Only the one shift though, which I'm assuming is from 2nd to 3rd. When I got on I-80 again, I was running 65-70 mph at 3500 - 4000 rpms. Any idea what rpms are to be expected for stock wheels/tires in third gear at 70 mph? I believe the gear ratio for third gear is 1.0. I'm used to running my more modern Kia Optima and Buick Regal at 2000 rpm's at that speed, but they probably have an overdrive gear. I just want to make sure that I am hitting third gear and that running at 3500-4000 rpms at that speed is normal.

Thanks again,

Jeff
 

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Sr. Dill,
$3000 for an M41? I bought my first one for $100 and another one for $45, and had one GIVEN to me last September. Obviously they are used and MIGHT have problems but not over $2000 worth! Looks to me like the biggest deal would be fabbing the rear mount in an automatic 122.
 

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By the way, at the same time I opened this thread, I opened one for the same issue on the Volvo UK forum (http://www.volvoforums.org.uk/showthread.php?t=156868). There, one of the responders is saying I should : Use only ATF-G or fluid that meets Ford spec. M2C-33G. DON'T use any of the DEXRON type fluids. Any idea why this would be a bad idea?
Some DEXRON fluids are indeed not for the T-35 but the Valvoline/DEXRON III/Mercon is specifically for transmissions originally calling for Type A/Suffix A fluid including the Borg-Warner T-35.

George Dill
 

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The tach speed, while in D, is around 500 - 600 rpms. Let me know what it should be. It jumps up to 800 - 900 when I have the car in P.

Last night I made some progress, I think. I read the specific section of the manual (adjusting the downshift valve cable). I'm assuming this is the cable that is attached to the throttle linkage towards the firewall side of the engine compartment. This cable goes down to the transmission. Indeed, there was a LOT of slack on the throttle linkage end. I removed the slack as described in the manual on page 4-16, section A (although I don't know if I have the necessary tools to measure the line pressure as described in A.3.b. It is pretty close to the point where I don't have the ability to take out much more slack.

I took it for a drive and now I definitely feel (and see via the tach) a shift occurring when I am somewhere between 2500 and 3000 rpms (at about 35 mph). Only the one shift though, which I'm assuming is from 2nd to 3rd. When I got on I-80 again, I was running 65-70 mph at 3500 - 4000 rpms. Any idea what rpms are to be expected for stock wheels/tires in third gear at 70 mph? I believe the gear ratio for third gear is 1.0. I'm used to running my more modern Kia Optima and Buick Regal at 2000 rpm's at that speed, but they probably have an overdrive gear. I just want to make sure that I am hitting third gear and that running at 3500-4000 rpms at that speed is normal.

Thanks again,

Jeff
Progress! The next time you work on the kickdown cable cinch it up to the point of no slack. You will know if you get it too tight as shifting will be all out of whack.

The speedometer on any Amazon is known to be very optimistic given 165-15 tires or smaller. 70mph at 3500rpm is about right for third gear/lockup. The shift you felt at about 35mph was indeed to third gear.

The rpms look good both in D and P. In very hot weather (AC?) and/or stop-n-go traffic the car may heat up a bit sitting still in D with brake applied. If so consider shifting to N and using the hand brake while waiting for the red light to go green.

To confirm that the car starts in second gear from a stop - at idle with brake applied shift to D then lift off the brake and give just enough throttle to get the car rolling then shift quickly to L. If you feel a shift then the car started in second gear.

Next up should be an inspection of the shift linkage to include condition and adjustment. I have always done the adjustment in R but the book says to use N - either will work.

The reason I used R? The final linkage adjustment insures three things - engagement of R when lever is at R, proper operation of reversing lights and correct functioning of the starter inhibitor switch.

George Dill
 

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Good to know you made the progress, and may be your transmission is OK.

At 70 indicated, there should be about 4000 rpm with a manual. The auto, because of the torque converter, may show 100-200 more when on the throttle (accelerating), and 200-300 less when off the throttle (coasting). Note that the tire size makes no difference, because the speedometer does not "know" whether you have low profile tires or the old 165-80-15 tires. The tires make a difference on whether you are indeed going 70 mph, but your poor speedo has absolutely no clue :) .

While M41's can be expensive because they are more rare, an M40 is not that expensive. The M40 will really transform the performance of the car at low speed, but at anything over 60 will not make much difference (other than the pump losses of the slush box). Of course, Volvos are a lot of fun at low speeds as well, so you may be missing a lot with the auto. But at least you are on the road now.
 
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