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Re: Refurbishing an engine that grew up in the north (Kaizai)

Here's two links to Eastwood Company. The first one is tech tips for metal polishing & buffing. The second links to the product listing. Get them to mail you a catalog or check it out on-line. They're products may be a little more somtimes, but they've got everything under one roof and it's all top quality. After you polish and bluff, you can coat it so that you won't have to do it again.


http://www.eastwoodco.com/jump...=1445

http://www.eastwoodco.com/jump...D=432
 

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Re: Refurbishing an engine that grew up in the north (Prospero)

Quote, originally posted by Prospero »
... I will be treating with Naval Jelly one of these days since it's worked well on aircraft parts in the past.

Have you ever used naval jelly on Aluminum before?
 

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Re: Refurbishing an engine that grew up in the north (Prospero)

I was thinking that it would be too aggressive for Al, but the surface is essentially all oxide and that's pretty tough stuff. While you were posting, I came across this: Duro® Aluminum Jelly Corrosion Remover. Checked its safety data sheet and it is 10-30% phosphoric acid, diethylene glycol and some surfactant. Looks like it could be a watered down version of Naval Jelly. It might be easier to use. I don't know if I'd want to use either of these products under the hood; better to remove the parts first--even a cyl head or block...
 

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Re: Refurbishing an engine that grew up in the north (Prospero)

Quote, originally posted by Prospero »
…consider how many wheel cleaners have the same ingredients in them and how widely they are used in the automotive industry. Used correctly they can be your best pal; however if used the wrong way you are going to suffer!

Right you are there, some of the wheel cleaners are pretty nasty stuff--but I'll bet that naval jelly has at least 2-3x or more the acid.

On a related note and more than a pet peeve, it always amazes me how easy it is to procure and use many of these materials compared to the precautions that would be taken with them in an industrial environment. I don't think that the latter is being overly cautious, it's more likely the loopholes that allow their relatively unregulated use in the consumer market where safety and disposal considerations are often overlooked--even in our litigious society. The info may or may not be on the label, but who's reading them anyhow; if people actually read the labels of the weed and bug killers that they are buying, they would be shocked.

Simple green does not have to declare its phosphoric acid content on their safety data sheets... Even Coca-Cola lists it as an ingredient.
Do know the old joke about how to remove rust from your bumper?
 

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Re: (V70pilot)

Quote, originally posted by V70pilot »
As I recall, Naval Jelly makes a separate product for use on aluminum. I wouldn't use the version made for steel on aluminum

Indeed, they do (see my other post above), it is essentially just a weaker product. Naval jelly works by removing the oxide coating and if left on too long can cause pitting on the surface, i.e. it's eating the metal away--like the phosphate containing anti-freezes did to aluminum engine blocks.
 
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