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Re: Refurbishing an engine that grew up in the north (Kaizai)

Oddly enough, I have the same problem with my C70 despite the <30k miles on it...

I have been washing the engine bay with Simple Green every week and it's slowly taking it back to a clean metal look. I will be treating with Naval Jelly one of these days since it's worked well on aircraft parts in the past.

In the end, you will need to get in with hands & elbows to really get it looking nice...but the weekly treatment of simple green does a bunch to get it started.

Cheers,
Prospero
 

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Re: Refurbishing an engine that grew up in the north (MrTippy)

Quote, originally posted by MrTippy »
Have you ever used naval jelly on Aluminum before?

Yes. It is not as effective on aluminum as it is on steel...but it's PH of 1 doesn't care much about what material it is on. Just be sure to clean it off quickly and then hit it with baking soda or bleach.

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Prospero
 

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Re: Refurbishing an engine that grew up in the north (MrTippy)

Quote, originally posted by MrTippy »
I was thinking that it would be too aggressive for Al, but the surface is essentially all oxide and that's pretty tough stuff. While you were posting, I came across this: Duro® Aluminum Jelly Corrosion Remover. Checked its safety data sheet and it is 10-30% phosphoric acid, diethylene glycol and some surfactant. Looks like it could be a watered down version of Naval Jelly. It might be easier to use. I don't know if I'd want to use either of these products under the hood; better to remove the parts first--even a cyl head or block...

Well, you are right to be a little apprehensive about using this on the engine. You do need to be judicious about where you apply the gel and also to make completely sure that you remove all traces of it when you're done with the application. But let's be a little on the eccentric side for just a moment&#8230;consider how many wheel cleaners have the same ingredients in them and how widely they are used in the automotive industry. Used correctly they can be your best pal; however if used the wrong way you are going to suffer!

Really the reason I aim for the naval jelly is specifically due to its ability to stay on the areas where I put it&#8230;and linger on vertical surfaces as well. If you treat your engine with the jelly and avoid mating surfaces, fasteners, and focus on the cast components&#8230;you'll live through it with little more than a strange odor and a clean engine.

Cheers,
Prospero
 

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Re: (MrTippy)

Quote, originally posted by MrTippy »
Indeed, they do, it is essentially just a weaker product. Naval jelly works by removing the oxide coating and if left on too long can cause pitting on the surface, i.e. it's eating the metal away--like the phosphate containing anti-freezes did to aluminum engine blocks.

Yeah, you have to wonder who was the chemist for that formula of coolant...

Anyhow, just to get this off my chest...when you polish your engine, sand, or use scotch-brite...it all removes metal and eats in. So you're letting the chemicals do the work for you... There is no shame in that!!!


Cheers,
Prospero
 
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