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So I am looking for anyone with some input on getting a car that has lived in the snow its whole life to look new again. For all the metal bits that are getting that nice white speckled look is there anything you can do or is it basically over for them cosmetically? <p><IMG SRC="http://www.deepnetconsulting.com/swedespeed/users/kaizai/49.jpg" BORDER="0"><br>
 

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Re: Refurbishing an engine that grew up in the north (Kaizai)

I'd imagine that you could polish it off with a mild abrasive. I've never tried, though. Would be an exercise in futility in Vermont! <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vortexmediagroup.com/images/banghead.gif" BORDER="0">
 

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Re: Refurbishing an engine that grew up in the north (VTT5)

Even in FLA you might get a little salt air or ocean mist pitting. But youyr right not as bad as good old North East road salt dust and spray into to everything. Best idea is to yes carelfully powerwash car and then try to polish it up with ALUM polish. No where does that mean your going to get it like new. or even like a nice FLA car. But it will come up nicer. Short of too much work and alot of time and taking things apart and polishing OFF CAR it is a loosing deal. <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/biggrin.gif" BORDER="0">
 

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Re: Refurbishing an engine that grew up in the north (Kaizai)

Here's two links to Eastwood Company. The first one is tech tips for metal polishing & buffing. The second links to the product listing. Get them to mail you a catalog or check it out on-line. They're products may be a little more somtimes, but they've got everything under one roof and it's all top quality. After you polish and bluff, you can coat it so that you won't have to do it again. <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/smile.gif" BORDER="0"><p><A HREF="http://www.eastwoodco.com/jump.jsp?itemID=1445&itemType=CATEGORY&iMainCat=688&iSubCat=1445" TARGET="_blank">http://www.eastwoodco.com/jump...=1445</A> <p><A HREF="http://www.eastwoodco.com/jump.jsp?itemType=CATEGORY&itemID=432" TARGET="_blank">http://www.eastwoodco.com/jump...D=432</A>
 

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Get it free from grease and grime and paint it. Bare aluminum will always look like ass after a while when exposed to air.<p>Or do what I did, jet wash, solvent tank, bead blast, solvent tank again then either clear coat or paint it.<p><IMG SRC="http://www.pbase.com/dkauer744/image/50551300/large.jpg" BORDER="0"><br>nasty poop<p><IMG SRC="http://www.pbase.com/dkauer744/image/58691754.jpg" BORDER="0"><br>clean and painted nice stuff :-D<p>I believe its plastikote makes a "cast aluminum" paint. Its good looking stuff (its what my block, and accessories brackets are painted). Dont just get "aluminum" paint, its ussualy really ugly color wise.
 

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omg that is a sexy engine <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/biggrin.gif" BORDER="0">
 

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Re: (phuz)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>phuz</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">omg that is a sexy engine <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/biggrin.gif" BORDER="0"></TD></TR></TABLE><p>Thanks :-D
 

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Re: (doug242ti)

Oh man, I have to go change my shorts. That would last 6.24 minutes in Toronto, Canada <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/frown.gif" BORDER="0">
 

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Re: Refurbishing an engine that grew up in the north (Kaizai)

Oddly enough, I have the same problem with my C70 despite the <30k miles on it...<p>I have been washing the engine bay with Simple Green every week and it's slowly taking it back to a clean metal look. I will be treating with Naval Jelly one of these days since it's worked well on aircraft parts in the past.<p>In the end, you will need to get in with hands & elbows to really get it looking nice...but the weekly treatment of simple green does a bunch to get it started.<p>Cheers,<br>Prospero
 

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Re: Refurbishing an engine that grew up in the north (Prospero)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>Prospero</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">... I will be treating with Naval Jelly one of these days since it's worked well on aircraft parts in the past.</TD></TR></TABLE><p>Have you ever used naval jelly on Aluminum before?
 

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Re: Refurbishing an engine that grew up in the north (MrTippy)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>MrTippy</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">Have you ever used naval jelly on Aluminum before?</TD></TR></TABLE><p>Yes. It is not as effective on aluminum as it is on steel...but it's PH of 1 doesn't care much about what material it is on. Just be sure to clean it off quickly and then hit it with baking soda or bleach.<p>Cheers,<br>Prospero
 

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Re: Refurbishing an engine that grew up in the north (Prospero)

I was thinking that it would be too aggressive for Al, but the surface is essentially all oxide and that's pretty tough stuff. While you were posting, I came across this: Duro® Aluminum Jelly Corrosion Remover. Checked its safety data sheet and it is 10-30% phosphoric acid, diethylene glycol and some surfactant. Looks like it could be a watered down version of Naval Jelly. It might be easier to use. I don't know if I'd want to use either of these products under the hood; better to remove the parts first--even a cyl head or block...
 

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Re: Refurbishing an engine that grew up in the north (MrTippy)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>MrTippy</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">I was thinking that it would be too aggressive for Al, but the surface is essentially all oxide and that's pretty tough stuff. While you were posting, I came across this: Duro® Aluminum Jelly Corrosion Remover. Checked its safety data sheet and it is 10-30% phosphoric acid, diethylene glycol and some surfactant. Looks like it could be a watered down version of Naval Jelly. It might be easier to use. I don't know if I'd want to use either of these products under the hood; better to remove the parts first--even a cyl head or block... </TD></TR></TABLE><p>Well, you are right to be a little apprehensive about using this on the engine. You do need to be judicious about where you apply the gel and also to make completely sure that you remove all traces of it when you're done with the application. But let’s be a little on the eccentric side for just a moment…consider how many wheel cleaners have the same ingredients in them and how widely they are used in the automotive industry. Used correctly they can be your best pal; however if used the wrong way you are going to suffer! <p>Really the reason I aim for the naval jelly is specifically due to its ability to stay on the areas where I put it…and linger on vertical surfaces as well. If you treat your engine with the jelly and avoid mating surfaces, fasteners, and focus on the cast components…you’ll live through it with little more than a strange odor and a clean engine.<p>Cheers,<br>Prospero<br>
 

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Re: Refurbishing an engine that grew up in the north (Prospero)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>Prospero</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">…consider how many wheel cleaners have the same ingredients in them and how widely they are used in the automotive industry. Used correctly they can be your best pal; however if used the wrong way you are going to suffer! <br></TD></TR></TABLE><p>Right you are there, some of the wheel cleaners are pretty nasty stuff--but I'll bet that naval jelly has at least 2-3x or more the acid.<p>On a related note and more than a pet peeve, it always amazes me how easy it is to procure and use many of these materials compared to the precautions that would be taken with them in an industrial environment. I don't think that the latter is being overly cautious, it's more likely the loopholes that allow their relatively unregulated use in the consumer market where safety and disposal considerations are often overlooked--even in our litigious society. The info may or may not be on the label, but who's reading them anyhow; if people actually read the labels of the weed and bug killers that they are buying, they would be shocked.<p>Simple green does not have to declare its phosphoric acid content on their safety data sheets... Even Coca-Cola lists it as an ingredient. <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/wink.gif" BORDER="0"> Do know the old joke about how to remove rust from your bumper?<p>
 

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Re: (V70pilot)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>V70pilot</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">As I recall, Naval Jelly makes a separate product for use on aluminum. I wouldn't use the version made for steel on aluminum</TD></TR></TABLE><p>Indeed, they do (see my other post above), it is essentially just a weaker product. Naval jelly works by removing the oxide coating and if left on too long can cause pitting on the surface, i.e. it's eating the metal away--like the phosphate containing anti-freezes did to aluminum engine blocks.
 

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Re: (MrTippy)

<TABLE WIDTH="90%" CELLSPACING=0 CELLPADDING=0 ALIGN=CENTER><TR><TD><i>Quote, originally posted by <b>MrTippy</b> »</i></TD></TR><TR><TD CLASS="quote">Indeed, they do, it is essentially just a weaker product. Naval jelly works by removing the oxide coating and if left on too long can cause pitting on the surface, i.e. it's eating the metal away--like the phosphate containing anti-freezes did to aluminum engine blocks. </TD></TR></TABLE><p>Yeah, you have to wonder who was the chemist for that formula of coolant...<p>Anyhow, just to get this off my chest...when you polish your engine, sand, or use scotch-brite...it all removes metal and eats in. So you're letting the chemicals do the work for you... There is no shame in that!!! <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/vwbb/wink.gif" BORDER="0"><p>Cheers,<br>Prospero
 
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