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Here in the midwest we are getting hammered last several days with almost 20" of snow and about an inch of ice in there. I went out Saturday and was promptly immobilized at an intersection where there was some drifting snow. Stupid me I guess, but the auto parking brake was on, and the park assist was going nuts picking up snow drifts all over. Car also kept telling me to clean the sensors because they were blocked. Yes, it's snowing and nasty, I get the sensors are blocked, no need to tell me. Anyway, flipped through the menus and turned traction control off, park assist off, auto brake off, and away we went. Seems silly to have to do all these things. Since then, car seems a bit better about alerting adjacent snow. But still, seems silly for the vehicle to have all these alerts and not have some option that says "HEY, YES, IT'S SNOWING, STOP BUGGING ME".

Other than that, it's been getting around very well, provided the traction control and park assist stay off. Perhaps a bit over engineered and underthought for a Swedish vehicle that should anticipate arctic conditions?
 

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So the park assist was detecting snow and alerting you that you were too close to something? That'd be annoying.

But, why would you turn traction control off, aren't those exactly the type of conditions where you want traction control? I.e. How was it misbehaving?
 

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First, people complain they don't have it. Then, they complain they have to turn it of when they get annoyed by the system.
There is no way to win.

The owner's manual clearly stated that drift slow will blind the sensors and cause issues, there are 91 times the owner manual mentioned snow and 31 instance it mentioned ice.

http://esd.volvocars.com/local/us/Volvo-2016-XC90-Owners-Manual-v3.pdf
 

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But, why would you turn traction control off, aren't those exactly the type of conditions where you want traction control? I.e. How was it misbehaving?

According to the owner's manual, http://esd.volvocars.com/local/us/Volvo-2016-XC90-Owners-Manual-v3.pdf


Electronic Stability Control (ESC)
sport mode
ESC is always activated and cannot be switched
off.
However, the driver can select Sport mode,
which offers more active driving characteristics.
In Sport mode, the engine management system
monitors movement of the accelerator pedal and
steering wheel for sportier driving and allows
more lateral movement of the rear wheels before
ESC is triggered.
Under certain circumstances, such as when driving
with snow chains, or driving in deep snow or
loose sand, it may be advisable to temporarily use
Sport mode for maximum tractive force.

If the driver releases pressure on the accelerator
pedal, ETC will also activate to help stabilize the
vehicle.
Activating/deactivating Sport mode
In the center display's Function
view, tap ESC Sport Mode.
The green indicator light in the
button will illuminate to show
that the function has been activated
or gray when the function
is deactivated.
When Sport mode is activated, this
symbol will illuminate in the instrument
panel. It will remain on until the driver
deactivates the function. ETC will also
return to normal mode when the engine is restarted.
Related information
• Electronic
 

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First, people complain they don't have it. Then, they complain they have to turn it of when they get annoyed by the system.
There is no way to win.
There should be a way, the system just needs to be better or smarter.

My first experience with Volvo parking sensors in a loaner was extremely annoying. I'd be stopped at a light, not moving at all, and the front sensors went off for no reason, the stereo mutes, etc. Later was then in a fast food lane, stopped and somebody walked out crossing in front of me and it again went off and muted the stereo. VERY Annoying.

We've got wipers that can sense rain, I'd think using temp sensors or something there should be a way to make these sensors smarter or 'maybe' even auto disable themselves when they know they can't actually work. We use to have headlight wipers, maybe it's time for sensor wipers or even heaters to melt whatever builds up on them?

I don't follow any other brands. I'm curious if anybody knows of people reporting similar issues on other cars in other brand forums?
 

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First, people complain they don't have it. Then, they complain they have to turn it of when they get annoyed by the system.
There is no way to win.

The owner's manual clearly stated that drift slow will blind the sensors and cause issues, there are 91 times the owner manual mentioned snow and 31 instance it mentioned ice.

http://esd.volvocars.com/local/us/Volvo-2016-XC90-Owners-Manual-v3.pdf
You've seen the same people complain about not having it , then about having to turn it off?
 

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There should be a way, the system just needs to be better or smarter.

My first experience with Volvo parking sensors in a loaner was extremely annoying. I'd be stopped at a light, not moving at all, and the front sensors went off for no reason, the stereo mutes, etc. Later was then in a fast food lane, stopped and somebody walked out crossing in front of me and it again went off and muted the stereo. VERY Annoying.

We've got wipers that can sense rain, I'd think using temp sensors or something there should be a way to make these sensors smarter or 'maybe' even auto disable themselves when they know they can't actually work. We use to have headlight wipers, maybe it's time for sensor wipers or even heaters to melt whatever builds up on them?

I don't follow any other brands. I'm curious if anybody knows of people reporting similar issues on other cars in other brand forums?
The only issues I have with my parking assist sensors are when in drive-thru lines with landscaping very close to the car or support posts, etc near the vehicle. But that's the only time they give audible alarm and that's exactly when they should be working.

So I'm not sure I follow your point - in your MY16 XC90 the sensors are malfunctioning? Or they're just too sensitive?
 

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Nobody's going to read a 575 page manual before driving a car, and they should not have to.
Well, I would think you would reach for some source of information - manual, dealer staff, Internet - when you have a question about how something operates. Or do you believe that the operationn of all things automotive should be intuitively obvious? If the point of sale terminals at retail stores are just different enough to make me fumble the process half the time then I think it's pretty good when 99% of the equipment on my car needs zero explanation.
 

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People now can rightfully complain their car instead of their life partner when their mood changes. Huge win!

Sent from my SD4930UR using Tapatalk
 

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I still don't understand why you'd want to turn off traction control. I'm curious about the technical reasons, not what the manual says. If you're loosing traction on ice, then regulating power to various wheels should help you get moving, or stay on track. So how does driving in snow change this? If a wheel is stuck or spinning, again you'd want wheels that have traction to get the power.

Does anyone out there understand AWD and traction control systems well enough to explain? I'm coming from an old school part-time 4wd 4Runner, so this stuff is new to me. I'd also assumed that modern AWD with traction control would be better at choosing where to send power than 4wd, at least on the road.
 

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I still don't understand why you'd want to turn off traction control. I'm curious about the technical reasons, not what the manual says. If you're loosing traction on ice, then regulating power to various wheels should help you get moving, or stay on track. So how does driving in snow change this? If a wheel is stuck or spinning, again you'd want wheels that have traction to get the power.

Does anyone out there understand AWD and traction control systems well enough to explain? I'm coming from an old school part-time 4wd 4Runner, so this stuff is new to me. I'd also assumed that modern AWD with traction control would be better at choosing where to send power than 4wd, at least on the road.
You do NOT want to turn ESC off...ESC and AWD will keep your vehicle stable and provide best traction in snowy conditions.
 

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What happens if collision avoidance kicks in, like many have experienced, when you are on snow or ice.....is it possible for it to send the vehicle into a slide? From the reports I have seen it is somewhat aggressive when it kicks in.
 

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You do NOT want to turn ESC off...ESC and AWD will keep your vehicle stable and provide best traction in snowy conditions.
Just need a little wheel speed for limited spinning to start out on snow and that can be done in sport mode.
 

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going down the road in a couple inches of snow ESC is great if you hit black ice or the accumulation between lanes it can react far quicker than you can. But if the snow is touching bottom of the car and you can get going much better if you turn it of. That's been the one thing that has been universal in all the AWD cars I've owned.

I think the problem is that when your stuck in snow drifts or very deep snow the wheels spin so ESC sends it to another wheel that also spins and all the while it varies power trying to get some traction and stop spinning, when you turn off traction control all wheels spin but they also all offer the slightest bit of traction. My g35x sedan has been stuck twice in the brutal winters we've had the last couple years and it never fails to shut off the traction control to get unstuck and I never have to even leave the car.
 

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I still don't understand why you'd want to turn off traction control. I'm curious about the technical reasons, not what the manual says. If you're loosing traction on ice, then regulating power to various wheels should help you get moving, or stay on track. So how does driving in snow change this? If a wheel is stuck or spinning, again you'd want wheels that have traction to get the power.

Does anyone out there understand AWD and traction control systems well enough to explain? I'm coming from an old school part-time 4wd 4Runner, so this stuff is new to me. I'd also assumed that modern AWD with traction control would be better at choosing where to send power than 4wd, at least on the road.
I turn the DSTC off in my first gen XC90 when the snow makes me lose traction. When I turn a corner in town, sometimes the DSTC will slow me down to almost stopped because it is trying to give traction to one wheel which it deems has traction. If it turn it off, I can keep my speed and traction because I have dedicated snow tires. But that is at slow speeds, not highway.
 

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Just need a little wheel speed for limited spinning to start out on snow and that can be done in sport mode.
Why would you want that? Let the AWD system do its job and it will determine how much traction is needed on each wheel.
 

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Why would you want that? Let the AWD system do its job and it will determine how much traction is needed on each wheel.
Because on packy snow, the AWD doesn't sense it. When you go to start, the wheel will compress the snow under it, then the AWD tries to correct, and I end up doing .5mph all the way across the intersection. The tiny spin allows the car to push through the snow to what is solid underneath. More than an inch of snow though. Much more.
 

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Because on packy snow, the AWD doesn't sense it. When you go to start, the wheel will compress the snow under it, then the AWD tries to correct, and I end up doing .5mph all the way across the intersection. The tiny spin allows the car to push through the snow to what is solid underneath. More than an inch of snow though. Much more.
In all my years of driving in snow, I rarely (if ever at all) have experienced this, especially when Volvo added Instant Traction to its Haldex.
 

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In all my years of driving in snow, I rarely (if ever at all) have experienced this, especially when Volvo added Instant Traction to its Haldex.
GC, this isn't a Volvo aimed comment so don't get ruffled. I have driven in mountainous areas in snow and ice for almost 35 years. The traction control sometimes on any car is too smart for it's own self on any car that has that technology. It tries to prevent any wheel spin and on snow that's a recipe for sitting still or creeping along. A limited amount of wheel speed spin gets you going and keeps you going. On any car with that technology you are allowed to either turn it off completely or in Volvo's case allow increased wheel spin.

Just check page 160 in the 2014 Volvo XC90 owner's manual where it states:

"Spin control (SC)
The spin control function is designed to help
prevent the drive wheels from spinning while
the vehicle is accelerating.
Under certain circumstances, such as when
driving with snow chains, or driving in deep
snow or loose sand, it may be advisable to
temporarily switch off this function for maximum
tractive force."


I feel confident similar language is in the new 2016 manual as well. Please confirm if you wish as I don't have a copy.

Thanks

Mike
 
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