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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am considering to replace my PVC oil trap on my T6 3.0l (95,000 miles) and was wondering if I should get a Volvo OEM part (volvowholesaleparts.com) or pickup the same part on eBay. I am thinking that this is not a critical part on the engine and I could save some money on this purchase.

Has anyone used a generic PCV oil trap and what are your results or comments

Volvo Whole Sale parts: $187.61
eBay: $46.00

Thanks
 

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I think I got the OEM part for around $150. I sprung for the OEM part because the last thing I'd want is a blown seal or oil leak because I was trying to save a hundred bucks - just not worth it to me and just my opinion of course.
 
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I just did mine on my P1 and went OEM. It's not a hard part to swap, but I did it as preventative maintenance and figured the OEM one lasted 15 years and 120k miles... so I didn't mind spending more for the Volvo branded stuff.
 
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I am considering to replace my PVC oil trap on my T6 3.0l (95,000 miles) and was wondering if I should get a Volvo OEM part (volvowholesaleparts.com) or pickup the same part on eBay. I am thinking that this is not a critical part on the engine and I could save some money on this purchase.

Has anyone used a generic PCV oil trap and what are your results or comments

Volvo Whole Sale parts: $187.61
eBay: $46.00

Thanks
not critical……? This is one area that I would just go OEM.
 
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You may not think it is a critical part now, but you will if codes start appearing or your car goes into limp mode. I changed the diaphragm with an after market part to save money. Six months later, I was hearing occasional whistling and codes would come and go. When the car went into limp mode, I knew I waited too long. This time I paid an independent Volvo mechanic to replace the whole trap with the Volvo part. There is a difficult step to remove screws near the cowl, and they could do it much faster than me. On inspecting the diaphragm, there was nothing wrong, but it was thicker and obviously leaked air. $300 more was worthwhile to me. $140 more would be worthwhile if I changed it myself because I don't want to do it again in six months.
 

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Well if you are gonna pay a shop to do it, might as well pay a Volvo dealer, then you get the warranty with it.
 

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Well if you are gonna pay a shop to do it, might as well pay a Volvo dealer, then you get the warranty with it.
If you have a good dealer, sure. But my dealer quoted $200 more than the independent Volvo specialist. The indy shop guarantees its work and did it while I ate nearby. I talk directly to whichever mechanic does the work and he shows me the actual parts replaced. The dealer never does that.

Worth mentioning again, any parts purchased from FCPEuro.com are guaranteed for life.
 

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I talk directly to whichever mechanic does the work and he shows me the actual parts replaced. The dealer never does that.
Do you ask them to do that? It isn't standard practice but I never have a problem talking to a customer who asks, showing them what they need or what was done, etc.

Worth mentioning again, any parts purchased from FCPEuro.com are guaranteed for life.
Not labor though. Not a big deal for this specific job, but also worth mentioning.
 

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Do you ask them to do that? It isn't standard practice but I never have a problem talking to a customer who asks, showing them what they need or what was done, etc.
I usually ask how worn were the old brakes? Or what did the old trap look like inside? They automatically say I'll show you or ask if I want to see it. It's 30 seconds of education and trust building. As the owner puts it, he'd rather customers know enough to understand the cause of bigger problems, so they don't delay doing recommended maintenance. Also, if I say I worked on something myself, there's no judgment like with the dealer. At the dealer, I never even see the tech, questions take 10 minutes to track down a response, and they want every customer to leave ASAP. Not every dealer, but that's my situation.
 

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I just bought the OEM PCV trap from Riley Volvo during their 4th of July sale. $116 shipped.

My advice is to wait for a Labor Day sale from Riley or another Volvo dealer so you can score the OEM part.
 

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I usually ask how worn were the old brakes? Or what did the old trap look like inside? They automatically say I'll show you or ask if I want to see it. It's 30 seconds of education and trust building. As the owner puts it, he'd rather customers know enough to understand the cause of bigger problems, so they don't delay doing recommended maintenance. Also, if I say I worked on something myself, there's no judgment like with the dealer. At the dealer, I never even see the tech, questions take 10 minutes to track down a response, and they want every customer to leave ASAP. Not every dealer, but that's my situation.
When I had my car in for some warranty work a few years ago that took a few trips to rectify the problem I began talking to the tech directly. He called me during a test drive and again when he had the car apart and discovered the problem. That wasn't typical but if I had any specific questions or wanted to see parts the service writer would have had no problem allowing me to talk directly to the tech.
 

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Yeah that's a shame. I wish my advisor would bring every customer back to sell work. It's usually an easy sell when I show and explain what I'm recommending.

I have plenty of customers I know by name and request me to work on their vehicle when they come in. One of my favorites even brings me beer!
 

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I have decided to go with the Volvo OEM oil trap cover and see how well it works. I did have considerable oil around my ignition coils and spark plugs when I replaced them last summer. I did go around and cleaned that up and tightened the bolts of the valve cover and that seemed to work to stop the oil leak. I am doing this because of very high air pressure from my oil cap and dipstick as well as preventative maintenance.
 

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I bought an oem one on fcp euro, lifetime warranty on a relatively expensive wear part seemed worthwhile to me

But somehow it was $50 cheaper last fall

Odd.
 

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I bought an oem one on fcp euro, lifetime warranty on a relatively expensive wear part seemed worthwhile to me

But somehow it was $50 cheaper last fall

Odd.
Parts prices are a little all over the place in the past year and a half. I got a hitch for my XC70 last summer from etrailer and a few months later the same exact part number was something like 50% higher.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I wanted to share some things regarding replacement parts for this oil trap PCV cover.
I purchased two PVC oil traps, one from a Volvo dealership selling them online and the other from Amazon.
  • The products are very similar in appearance. All bolt holes and other features seemed to match.
  • I weighed them both, and the Amazon Oil Trap was about 4 grams heavier.
  • The gasket on the Volvo OEM oil trap is smaller in overall diameter than the Amazon one. Not sure if this makes any difference in overall quality or durability.
  • The small attached hose on the OEM seems to have more rubber content than the oil trap on the Amazon product.
  • The actual PCV cover and diaphragm seem to match what is observable on both.
  • Pricing; Amazon $46.00 Volvo OEM $187.99

When I pull my old oil trap off my XC60 T6, I will compare them again.
131084
131085
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I did replace the PVC oil trap over the weekend with a Non-OEM unit from Amazon. The process took about 2.5 hours, and it was more difficult due to access of the rear bolts on the oil pan beneath the firewall.
  • I used an offset bit driver with a 1.5” bit extension and a small T30 Torx bit. The clearance from the top of the oil pan and firewall is very tight! I needed to remove the fasteners for the plastic cowling for the wipers and force a 2x4 piece of blocking between the metal part of the firewall and the pan to get my hand down to the bolts. This allowed reasonable but tight access to the back two bolts.
  • The attached image was taken after I wiped some excess oil with a shop towel.
  • My XC60 T6 has about 97,000 miles and was running well except for the high suction at the oil fill cap.
After I finished the job and moved my Volvo out of the garage, I could barely hear the Inline six-cylinder engine at idle. I turned off all accessories, and the engine was barely noticeable.
The engine is now running much quieter and smoother. The problems that have had the Sport Mode since I purchased this vehicle at 35,000 miles have been significantly reduced. I brought my XC60 into Borton Volvo twice for these Sport Mode Issues, and even with a software update, it remained.

The bottom line is I highly recommend replacing this PVC oil trap if your Volvo has over 80,000 miles!



Motor vehicle Automotive exterior Bumper Gas Auto part
Musical instrument accessory Font Auto part Rectangle Composite material
 

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xchauler: Thanks for sharing this information. I tried the "easy and cheap" method of repairing my PCV by just changing the diaphragm/spring/cover but I have had nothing but problems after trying this approach twice. So replacing the oil trap is my next step. Not sure at this point if I will go OEM or aftermarket, but leaning towards OEM.

I have read here on the forum that after changing this part, the engine oil needs to be changed. Can anyone explain why this is necessary?
 

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xchauler: Thanks for sharing this information. I tried the "easy and cheap" method of repairing my PCV by just changing the diaphragm/spring/cover but I have had nothing but problems after trying this approach twice. So replacing the oil trap is my next step. Not sure at this point if I will go OEM or aftermarket, but leaning towards OEM.

I have read here on the forum that after changing this part, the engine oil needs to be changed. Can anyone explain why this is necessary?
By just replacing the Diaphram, you are just covering up the problem. Always replace the entire assembly. The reason that the diaphram rips in the first place, is because the oil trap itself has become clogged up and the increased pressure causes the diaphram to rip. By replacing just the diaphram, you still have all that pressure so it is going to rip again. By replacing the entire oil trap, you are decreasing that pressure because tall the baffles and passages within the oil trap are brand new and clog free.
 

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xchauler: Thanks for sharing this information. I tried the "easy and cheap" method of repairing my PCV by just changing the diaphragm/spring/cover but I have had nothing but problems after trying this approach twice. So replacing the oil trap is my next step. Not sure at this point if I will go OEM or aftermarket, but leaning towards OEM.

I have read here on the forum that after changing this part, the engine oil needs to be changed. Can anyone explain why this is necessary?


For me, I went OEM, and bought from FCP Euro, since their lifetime warranty will replace it in the future for the cost of shipping.
 
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