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Brandom,
I have a set of connectors & boots as well as an old harness that I'd be willing to send your way for the right price. PM me to discuss.
The connector for the distributor is NLA and you would need the ECU connector as well, that is why I offer the old harness.
Now, for $500, you can order a brand new harness from VP Autoparts. http://212.247.61.152/US/main.aspx?page=article&artno=688360
That's what I did for my 73.
Let me know.
Steve
 

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Just offering up an opinion.

If you are planning on converting to Megasquirt II or any aftermarket EFI, do not spend significant dollars for a complete D jet wiring harness. The only connectors on the original D jet harness that you will use are the injectors and the engine coolant and air temperature sensors (if you retain the original air temperature sensor location which I recommend against). Everything else will be incompatible / unused. You can 'repurpose' some of the wires such as the TPS (after you remove the D jet connector and re terminate with the correct connector and reuse some of the distributor contact wiring for a CAS sensor (ditto on having to change the connectors). Modern EFI systems ground switch the injectors where as the D jet switches the injectors on the + 12 v side. Net effect the wiring harness connections have to be modified requiring harness modifications and the addition of injector resistors on the injector +12v supply (do not attempt to make use of the MS II injector PW current limiting function - too much agony).
 

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Is there a particular type of connector to get for these if you need to build a harness from scratch?
Bosch EV1 connectors work just fine. Otherwise, you can get replacement internal connectors (Djet style) from Rock auto for a couple bucks a piece. Its the same connector for the injector as it is for the temp sensors.
 

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Some things I need to look into are if the 850 TPS that @142guy used on his B20E build will also work on the B30E throttle body
It will. You just need to trim the brass shaft that the butterfly rides in a little.
 

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Since the B30e throttle body can be removed from the intake whereas the B20e manifold would require modification to do so I believe I may adapt an LS throttle body that has IAC and TPS already built in. Many of these are a drive by cable but there are a few that can also be found with drive by wire if you wanted to tackle that. I really haven't put much thought into where I will mount the MAP sensor. While the 142 has the original MAP sensor the original 164 was missing it. Since these are hens teeth anyways I'd rather just use a more readily available MAP.
Keep the B30 throttle body. You'll need all the vacuum ports that won't come on the LS throttle body. Plus, TPS retrofit is easy (other reply). Indeed, update your MAP. The B30 MAP sensors are really expensive and difficult to calibrate without special equipment. Find a small MAP that you can mount anywhere with a short bit of tubing or directly to the B30 intake manifold by fabricating a small mount that used the cold start injector bolt holes.

Also, if you go megasquirt, DIYautotune offers a much cleaner wiring harness. Whether you go with they're relay board or not, they have better options than reusing your Djet harness. Like 142 guy said, you're just saving the wire by reusing it. Plus, it's fairly inexpensive.

The cleanest option I've found for IAC is to use the 4 wire stepper motor off of an XJ Jeep cherokee. They're plentiful and inexpensive. DIYautotune sells a manifold block for it that is fairly compact. Then you can just route the lines from the outlet on your B30 air filter housing to the inlet on your B30 throttle body. You can mount the manifold block anywhere. This not only takes the place of your AAV (another unobtainable, expensive part), but eliminates the need for a fast idle solenoid too from the B30. You may or may not have the fast idle solenoid on your B30, as it was used in conjunction with the A/C on 164s.
 

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Keep the B30 throttle body. You'll need all the vacuum ports that won't come on the LS throttle body. Plus, TPS retrofit is easy (other reply). Indeed, update your MAP. The B30 MAP sensors are really expensive and difficult to calibrate without special equipment. Find a small MAP that you can mount anywhere with a short bit of tubing or directly to the B30 intake manifold by fabricating a small mount that used the cold start injector bolt holes.
The short answer:
If you retain the use of the D jet controller, you must use the original D jet MAP sensor. Modern semiconductor MAP sensors provide a DC output voltage that varies in direct proportion to the pressure signal. The Bosch sensor provides an output signal that is most definitely not a DC output voltage.

The dragged out answer:
The more modern MAP sensors used with digital fuel injection systems are semi conductor devices and the output signal typically varies in the range 0 - 5 volts (more like 0.5 - 4.5). The D jet sensor is a completely different animal. It is a two winding transformer (the 4 terminals on the sensor are the connections to the two winding) and the two windings are wrapped in a toroid around a magnetic core. The magnetic core is connected to the diaphragm in the sensor and moves in and out of the center of the 'transformer' as MAP changes. As the core moves in and out of the windings, it changes the magnetic coupling between the two windings. If you apply a fixed sine wave signal to one winding you get a sine wave signal on the other winding that varies in amplitude based upon core position / pressure. Rectify the signal and you have a DC voltage proportional to pressure. Prior to widespread implementation of lower cost semi conductor pressure sensing devices this was the common pressure measurement technique for electronic instrumentation systems.

If Bosch had used the fixed sine wave on one winding and measure the voltage on the other winding approach, it would not be that difficult to take a low cost semi conductor sensor like the Megasquirt uses ($20), combine it with something like an Arduino Due with a dedicated D to A plus a few electronic bits, add in some moderately simple code and you could have a MAP sensor that emulates the D jet MAP sensor for significantly less than $100. Unfortunately, Bosch didn't use the fixed sine wave in variable magnitude sine wave out approach. They used a signal approach that is simpler from a less hardware required in the controller perspective; but, more intellectually difficult to understand what is actually going on. You might be able to use the same sensor / Arduino / electronic bits to emulate the Bosch MAP sensor; but, figuring out exactly what Bosch did and writing the code to emulate the original sensor would be more of a challenge. Simple does not always equal easy.
 

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I was under the impression the B30 was getting an EFI controller update. If that is the case, definitely update your MAP. If you stick with Djet and the Djet map, this article is the best I've found about how it operates. This compliments what 142 Guy mentioned above.

https://members.rennlist.com/pbanders/manifold_pressure_sensor.htm

Since other folks may find it useful, the same individual does a very good Djet reverse engineer. It is quite technical. No getting around that.
https://members.rennlist.com/pbanders/djetfund.htm
https://members.rennlist.com/pbanders/ecu.htm
 

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My error. You are correct. I lost track of the various threads. As part of the MS retrofit a small semiconductor style MAP sensor is the way to go. There are lots of OEM sensors that can be fit right on the manifold or mounted on the firewall (or wherever). I like to troll the pick & pull looking for likely candidates - that is how I sourced my Bosch 2 wire idle air valve for $5.

I used the MAP sensor supplied with MS; but, mounted it in a small sealed enclosure that I located at the original D jet MAP sensor location. A sensor mounted directly on the manifold would have been the sanitary way to go; but, that would have required drilling and tapping holes in the manifold to mount the sensor and the B20E D jet manifold does not have a lot / any machined flat surfaces convenient for mounting. The B20E only has one existing true manifold vacuum port which was the original MAP sensor port and it now has a Tee fitted to accept lines from the MAP sensor and the fuel pressure regulator reference line.
 
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