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I have a 2011 S60 T6 Polestar. I was taking it on the race track, a short track, 5 laps at a time.

I took it in for a service yesterday to get it fully serviced, and fresh oil in it.

About half way through my second set of 5 laps, the low oil warning light came on. It settled and switched off after letting the car rest for about 10 minutes, but then started up again as soon as I started driving hard.

My mechanic mentioned they had used a low ash oil, as there is no turbo timer, to help when the engine is shut down without cooling, and that this oil expands more whilst in use. Also something about the sump not having a basalt or something, so the oil doesn't settle the same as a normal engine.

Just wanted to put it out there to any one who has taken their S60 T6 on the track, whether they have experienced a similar situation or not
 

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I've been hessitant to put sticky tires on mine and drive it on a race track for that exact reason. I autoxed it for a season with sticky tires. I would get low washer fluid lights in corners and the occasional low coolant light on really grippy pavement (even with the coolant at the max line), but never anything oil related. I religiously change the oil and run nice LiquiMoly oil in the car. But every time I've had it on a race track I've run my All season tires because I wasn't sure what the oil pan baffling looked like and running stickies in a 100mph corner that takes 4 or 5 seconds is quite different from autox where you corner for 1 second or so in each direction.
 

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The most important factors under on-track conditions when it comes to engine oil are oil pressure and temperature. As noted, with sticky tires and long, hi-speed turns the oil pick-up in the sump could start "sucking" air as the oil moves elsewhere in the sump, which can result in zero oil pressure at a time when you really need it--not good. Very high oil temperature (over 200C) can also produce low oil pressure. OTOH, a low oil LEVEL indication may not be too serious if you still have plenty of pressure.
In the English Ford-based motors I have had on the track, it was common practice to overfill the sump by ~0.5 quart to prevent oil starvation in right hand corners--even with a baffled pan. The only full-proof fix is a dry sump system.
 

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This is why I'm currently putting this on the honda race car. Drysump.... The nice thing about Honda, is this fancy drysump costs about the same as a Downpipe (close) for the S60.

 
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