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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Im new to this forum and Volvo. My wifes grandma passed away a couple decades ago and her grandmas car was sitting at her parents house. They sold their home and gave it to her. Its sentimental to her so im going to go through the tedious process of fixing it for her (it will be a long long road).I decided to register after i read a helpful post from 142 guy that read like this:

"The fuel pump relay gets power from the main FI relay. Terminal 86 on the pump relay is connected to terminal 87 on the main FI relay. The main FI relay powers up when you turn the ignition on (86 on the main FI relay is connected to the + terminal on the ignition coil). With the ignition switched on you should have steady +12v on the main FI relay 87 and the fuel pump relay 86 terminal.

The 87 terminal on the fuel pump relay is the wire to the fuel pump. With the motor not running, you should not have power on the 87 terminal. When you turn the engine to run, the ECU applies a ground for about 2 seconds to the fuel pump relay terminal 85 (wire 19). This causes the relay to energize and run the pump for 2 seconds to prime the fuel system. The pump will not start up again until you start cranking the motor.

Check for voltage on terminal 85 of the fuel pump relay (wire 19). With the ignition in the on position (and the pump not running) you should have 12 v there. If you don't then the main FI relay is dead, the coil in the pump relay is dead or you have a wiring problem. When the engine is cranking the voltage at terminal 85 of the pump relay should go to 0 volts because the ECU is applying a ground to energize the relay.


The pump relay is just a SPST relay. You can replace it with a Tyco or similar 30 amp black cube auto relay available from an electronics vendor for about $4.00. The Main FI relay is also a SPST relay; but, it has a polarizing diode in the coil circuit in it to prevent the relay from being energized (and toasting the ECU) in case some dufus installs the battery with the polarity reversed. You could replace it with the same Tyco relay with an external diode connected to the 86 terminal or you could skip the diode if you are confident that you will never install the battery (or boost the car) backwards.

If terminal 85 on the fuel pump relay has 12v when you turn the key to run and is not going to ground when you crank the engine, then the ECU may not be getting power. Dead ECUs do happen; but, the ECUs tend to be pretty reliable.


Full disclosure, I don't have the wiring diagram for an 1800 ES. I am going from the D jet wiring diagram for my 1971 142E. But, I expect that they will be the same."

....left me with questions though. Should position 87 show 12 volts while cranking (i would assume yes) mine does not. Looking at

Understanding Relays, part 3: Troubleshooting | Hagerty Media

Leads me to a question about position 30. Position 30 runs from the FI relay to a component on the complete other side of engine then back to position 30 on fuel pump relay. Im assuming this may be a fuse of some sort? (Sorry for my ignorance) When should position 30 show voltage? When should position 87 show voltage?

I removed the wires from position 30 on both relays and ran a continuity test... there was continuity 馃挭
 

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First off, the easy answer. Yes, terminal 87 on the fuel pump relay should have +12 volts whenever the engine is turning over (cranking and running).

I have attached a rather grainy screen capture of a rather grainy scan of the wiring diagram from the 1971 service manual. It should be mostly correct for your 1972, the primary difference being the arrangement for controlling the cold start valve which is not a concern - right now. When you refer to the FI relay, I presume you mean the Main Fuel Injection relay for the D jet system (68 on the diagram) as opposed to the fuel pump relay (69 on the diagram).

I have traced the power supply to the main fuel injection relay 30 terminal in green and the power supply to the fuel pump relay 30 terminal in red. Both power supplies originate at the power distribution block which is mounted on the inside left fender sort of below the battery tray and back from the headlight. This power distribution block is connected directly to the battery + terminal. The 30 terminals on both the main fuel injection relay and the fuel pump relay should have +12v on them all the time. The +12 v supply to the main fuel injection relay 30 terminal is direct - no fuse. The +12v supply to the fuel pump relay 30 terminal runs through a fuse which is mounted in a small black box which should be located on the very left side of the engine compartment on the same mounting bracket that holds the headlight, reverse light and rear defrost relays. The little relay box has three positions; but, unless you have factory fog lights (European GL models) only one fuse position (the fuel pump) is used.

So short answer, terminal 30 on both relays should have +12v on them all the time. Terminal 87 on the main fuel injection relay will have +12v on it whenever the ignition key is in the run or start position. Terminal 87 on the fuel pump relay should have +12v on it whenever the engine is turning over (cranking and running). Terminal 87 on the fuel pump relay will also go to +12 v for about 2 seconds when you first switch the key to run. This is a short pulse to run the pump to make sure that the fuel system is pressurized before you attempt a start (the system typically looses pressure due to leakage through the regulator or pump check valve).

You need to get a wiring diagram in order to do proper diagnosis. You can find copies of the Haynes 140 Volvo service manual on line for pretty low cost. I think the Volvo factory service manuals (green books) are still available. If you still have the original Volvo owners manual, open it up and you should find a wiring diagram in it. Its rather tiny, if you are approaching 50 you will likely need a magnifying glass to read the numbers.
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Just to jump on this as well. When I was getting my 73 142 going as well, the power distribution block was one of my problems since I did not know it was there. I was at the same point as you and replaced both relays with brand new ones. and then when that also didn't work started tracing wires back and found that block. i took the whole thing apart, cleaned it and put it back together and my fuel pump sprang to life

-Daniel
 

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72 (a name would be nice!);

Welcome to this forum!

Following with interest, but between copying parts of previous posts, and the question not being clear to me (30 and 87, among others, are terminal numbers on the relays), I got a bit lost after a while. 142G has given good info, and I expect will help you get power to the Fuel Pump. Loose or corroded connections along the way don't help!...and for a 140, that included the FuPu Fuse!
Clean, shiny and tight, and long-term protected with ACZP is my standard recommendation, and it hasn't failed anyone yet! See: SW-EM ACZP

Edit: Corrected Link:

Good Hunting!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
142 Guy, and everyone else! Thanks for the added information! So the box that was mounted next to the battery where the wires went for termination(s) 30 on the fuel pump relay and FI relay was a 8amp fuse and it was blown (stupid me). The distribution block connected to the battery positive side (before the fuse) was located just below the fuse box. This corrected the issue and i then received 12v at the connector for the fuel pump. I tested the fuel pump and it is not working so i will be replacing the pump and filter as well as cleaning out the tank as the gas coming out was ugly and contaminated. Lots more work to do after that but you cant put a price on some things 馃榿
 

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If you are in California, High Performance Auto in Torrance 'might' be close to you. High Perf has a pile of stuff, some of it salvage, that does not show up on their web site so a phone call may yield results. Iroll Motors also in California has a reasonable selection of parts; but, they tend to be 1800 specialists. Otherwise, VP Autoparts in South Carolina is probably your best bet in the US for a wide range of 140 parts. Sometimes Rock Auto has common parts for the 140 at a good price.

I use CVI which is in Sweden, Scandcar which is in the Netherlands and Skandix which is German. Between them and VP, if one of them doesn't have the part it probably does not exist. Shipping is nasty; but, for me South Carolina versus Sweden works out about the same in terms of shipping costs.
 

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72;

A "blown" fuse is (most often) a result of an overcurrent...this suggests that FuPu drew too much current, possibly a locked locked rotor from being gummed up by what old fuel turns into (or even worse, what dried fuel turns into)...but it might be savable!...I'd start by soaking FuPu in Stoddard Solvent or even just diesel, a few days, to free it up. OBSERVE FIRE PRECAUTIONS!

Your electrical connections look like they could use some love (and a good lathering up with ACZP after clean-up!)

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Follow Ron's advice on attempting a pump clean first. The pump head can be dis assembled to allow access to the rollers for better cleaning.

New replacement exact fit Bosch pumps are unavailable. There are rebuilds available at rather high prices. If you want an almost exact fit pump from a reliable vendor, the pump used in the Nissan 1975 - 1982 280ZX is a good choice (the early Datsun fuel injection systems were D jet derivatives)

Nissan part number 17011-P7211

They are more expensive than the cheap aftermarket generic pumps; but, they are pretty much an exact fit. It has the correct inlet and outlet port sizes in the correct locations and the correct diameter to fit the existing mount so no messing around trying to get a generic pump with axial inlet and outlet ports that are the wrong type (threaded not barbed) to fit. The only modification required is fitting crimp on lugs for the electrical connections.

If you shop around you can find them from Nissan authorized on line vendors for around $230. I have one and it has been running reliably for 5 years.
 

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142 Guy mentioned High Performance as a good source for parts. That's definitely true! They are also a source for extremely good advice. Here's a link to their website -
htp://www.hiperformanceautoservice.com/. Their phone # is (310) 533-0271. Eric is who you want to speak with. In looking at you picture of the blown fuse, I'm guessing there wasn't a black plastic cover with a captive screw that you had to remove to expose it. If that's the case, you should definitely order one as it can help keep this area clean. The part # for this cover is 941112. I believe they are a special order item, so it may take a while to get, but Eric can definitely order it for you.

Regarding the fuel pump, I've successfully resurrected a non-functioning one of these fuel pumps, as Ron indicated can be done. Note that the fuel exits the pump through a check valve that can be unscrewed from the pump. Don't lose the washer that goes between the check valve and the body of the pump. I sprayed PB Blaster into the fuel pump through this hole and let that soak for a day. I then used a screwdriver to GENTLY get the inner workings spinning again, as they had become frozen.

Before putting the check valve back on, inspect it carefully. There should be a small metal ball that rests just inside one end. Make sure it isn't stuck. It should be easy to get it to move back from the end, after which it should spring back. If it doesn't want to move and is stuck, it will not allow fuel to exit the pump (something I learned from Eric!). Even after replacing a couple of these check valves with NOS ones, they've occasionally given me this problem. Once while I was 40 miles from home, so that I had to do this disassembly process in a parking lot to fix it and get my '72 164E running. I now always remove this ball from my check valves so that this doesn't happen. The downside is having to do some extra cranking during startup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Im currently soaking the pump in diesel and have drained the gas tank. Im opting for a lazy clean and eco friendly clean of the gas tank with vinegar later today and flushing with water and and baking soda then drying the tank out. If the fuel pump does end up coming back to life i will be putting some sea foam in the tank and filling woth 92 oct gas. Prior to firing it up should i clean fuel injectors or roll the dice and see what happens and clean injectors if necessary?

Also it did and still does have a cover to the fuse box for termination 30 thats why i didnt initially see the fuse inside woops 馃槀
 

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The down side to trying to start the car with dirty injectors is if it doesn't start, is it the injectors or is it something else that is responsible for the no start condition. By sending the injectors out to be cleaned and flow tested you eliminate the injectors as a potential cause if the engine won't start and you can look elsewhere. If the engine starts, there is a definite potential down side to attempting to drive the car with dirty injectors. First, if one or more of the injectors has reduced flow it will cause those cylinders to run lean. At idle the risk of damage is low; but, if you try to drive the engine with significant load extreme lean operation can lead to piston, spark plug and valve damage. Second, if one or more of the injectors has something that is holding the injector pintel open the injector will flood the cylinder with gas. In a worst case this can be bad enough the you hydro lock the cylinder and bend a rod during starting. The not so bad case is that you just wash all the oil off the cylinder walls and contaminate the engine oil.

If you want to attempt a start before cleaning the injectors, at least pull the fuel rail with the injectors attached out of their holders, power up the pump (if it works) and check to make sure that none of the injectors are drooling fuel. Be careful when pulling out the injectors because they tend to stick in their seals and if one all of a sudden pops free you can bend and kink the fuel rail. Then you are in for a world on hurt! Once the injectors have been removed from old seals they will not reseal so order new holder seals for the pintels. Reassembling everything with silicone grease (dielectric tune up grease works just fine) will make things go together easier and make subsequent removals easier.

If you are really serious about being able to drive the car then I would remove the injectors and have them cleaned and flow tested. Removing the injectors and soaking then in a cleaning solution at home is not going to cut it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So i got the Anti鈥慍orrosive鈥慫inc鈥慞aste (ACZP) Im going to work on cleaning up the electrical connections why the tank is being cleaned and dried.

ill remove the injectors but i enjoy doing things myself so before i send them off im going to buy/borrow/rent a fuel injector cleaning kit and attempt to clean them myself. I wont be just taking them off and soaking them. Ive done it with fuel injectors from the junk yard before with success but its been many years... so ill se how it goes and update when im finished. Thanks for all the help/recommendations/advice!

When i was starting to clean out the gas tank i found a rubber fuel line running from the gas tank to the fuel pump that had a crack in it and started leaking so excited about finding that as it wasnt initially visible.

Also, the muffler is shot however the rest of the exhaust seems to be in good shape. Anyone here just cut off the muffler and run a straight pipe instead? To loud? Or does it sound good with the little 4 cylinder? Thanks again everyone!
 

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If you are going to attempt to clean the injectors yourself, keep in mind that the Bosch 280-150-036 injectors are low resistance injectors. The D jet controller has internal 6 ohm resistors to drop the voltage to the injectors. Use a pulsed voltage of around 4 volts to exercise the injectors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ive been looking online for different fuel pumps and i am having some issues. I have an old chilton (i believe)manual for 140 models from my year. It states 22 gph and 28psi drawing 5 amps. The fuse is 8 amp so it sounds correct. When i look at aftermarket fuel pumps it has been very challenging to find one with similar specs. Most in line (external pumps) are a much higher psi and amp draw for fuel injection. Compared to low pressure that draw the correct amps but not the required psi as they are for mechanical fuel conversions for carburetors. I looked at high performance site and unless i missed something i didnt see any fuel pumps listed. Other sites have listed pumps that they say will work with my vehicle but when i look up the specs on the pumps they are no where close to correct.
 

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I looked at high performance site and unless i missed something i didnt see any fuel pumps listed. [/QUOTE said:
phone Hi-perf, they have lots of parts not listed on the website, and lots of helpful advice too.
 

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Was your attempt at trying to resurrect your fuel pump unsuccessful? Have you had someone turn the key on while you sit by the fuel pump hoping to hear it turn, which, if it's working, would happen for just a short time (the pre-start cycle)? Have you measured for 12 volts at the connector for the pump, also while someone turns the key?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Yea i wasnt able to bring it back to life. I measured voltage and there was voltage...pump didnt turn on. I connected it directly to the 12v battery as well and nothing. I ended up buying a universal pump with similar amp draw new fuel filter 8 micron and a pre filter/strainer at 100 micron coming in this week. The cheapest pump i found was rebuilt for 350 plus shipping and new 800-1000k so i opted not to do that. Im also thinking of buying a new regulator with pressure gauge built in instead of the adjustable one on there right now so if i have any issues down the road i know there is correct psi in rail to injectors. Im going to be removing injectors and cleaning them this week while i wait for the parts. Tank looks good and clean not perfect but the vinegar and baking soda worked well.
 

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The Nissan pumps are a drop in replacement for an original Bosch pump and available for less than $250; but, if you have ordered something else be sure to get all the barbed end fittings required to make it match up with the odd hoses on the 140. I hope you did not purchase an Airtex, or its GMB or Ultra power clones. I had an Airtex and it only lasted a couple of months before it started howling and failing to deliver pressure. If you purchased one of the Bosch in-line pumps it should be good - after you get the hose fittings sorted out.

If you replace the fuel pressure regulator you must fit one that is adjustable. Modern port injection engines commonly run with a fixed base fuel pressure of 43 psi which is far too high for the D jet system. The regulator that you replace it with must be capable of operating at a base pressure of 30 psi and a lot of fuel pressure regulators, even the adjustable ones, will not do that reliably. Also, most modern pressure regulators have a vacuum reference line to the intake manifold to maintain a constant fuel pressure differential between the fuel rail and the intake manifold. The D jet is not set up to operate that way so you must not connect the vacuum reference line to the manifold. Just port it to atmosphere. If you connect the reference line to the manifold you will create engine operating problems. Personally, unless you know that the D jet regulator is defective I would leave it alone. Right now it seems like its way down on the potential problem list.
 
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