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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My S60 suffered a windshield crack while on tour in Sweden just south of Stockholm. Now that it's back in the states I need to have it repaired. I'm not sure it can be filled in because it is right in the drivers view, so it will likely have to be replaced. Does anyone have information on how well the dealer is able to do this ex-factory? We saw them doing this robotically in the factory with special glues etc. I'm wondering if there might be problems (alignment, noise, leaking, etc.) when it's replaced by hand by the dealer?<P>Thanks in advance.
 

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Freeworld,<P>The technicians at the dealership will use the exact same type of glue that was used at the factory. In fact, it isn't just one type of glue, it is a pretty complex chemical adhesion process. They use a primer and two part adhesive. I have seen this procedure done more times than I can count. My sister had to replace the windshield on her brand new Grand Cherokee a month after she bought it and it has been perfect ever since.<P>You have nothing to be affraid of, if you have it done at a well qualified place. There should be no noise, leaking, or alignment problems at all. Also, if you have insurance, it might cover the expense depending on your deductible.<P>-Drew<p>[This message has been edited by InDy (edited 08-01-2001).]
 

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Next to Project 850R in my garage is VWvortex's Project Golf 1.8T. A few months back, I managed to get a chip in the windshield. Most insurance policies cover the replacement, and so did mine. I ended up taking the car to a place across from the Harley Davidson dealer near the Airpark in Gaithersburg, MD. They came highly recomended by my insurance agent, and I have and zero probs with it since they've installed it. The only difference I've noticed is that the vin plate doesn't line up exactly with its place on the windshield.
 

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InDy,<BR>Thanks for the comforting thoughts. I'm going to let the dealer do it before I even take delivery in the states. The special insurance you have to buy for TDS is picking up most of the tab.<P>George,<BR>Thanks for the tip. I'll keep them in mind for future reference. I live just up the road from there.
 

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Many years ago, in the days of old, fixed glass was simply set into rubber moldings, where we all hoped it would not leak or fall out. In today's cars, the fixed glass (in the largest voids in the cars' bodies) is being used as a structural member. Somebody realized that this stuff is incredibly stable in shear. So, much like plywood is used in quake-prone California for shear strengthening homes, the windshield glass is now an integral part of the rigidity of your car. This is another way that manufacturers have managed to make cars torsionally stiffer, while making them still lighter.<P>Sure, this doesn't help with your question, but that's already been answered above. Just a bit of trivia for your next cocktail party.<P>- Darell<P>
 
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