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I am amazed that my brand new T6 MY22 got outdated just one month after I purchased it. This is unacceptable strategy from Volvo, the improvement in the electric motor is really remarkable, increasing power and autonomy.

In the website the specs are already updated.

How Volvo can treat customer like this? I am really disappointed.


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what exactly is the "unacceptable strategy"? I mean, what are the options here--never develop anything new? Always wait for an arbitrary "model year", which makes pretty much no sense since it doesn't really follow any sort of calendar year?

Or, announce changes several months in advance, and devalue the inventory dealers are sitting on and trying to sell?

Sorry, I understand your disappointment, but I just don't see any nefarious strategy here. Particularly in the world of EV's (or partial EV's), the only real constant is change and improved performance given the infancy of the design cycle.

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
what exactly is the "unacceptable strategy"? I mean, what are the options here--never develop anything new? Always wait for an arbitrary "model year", which makes pretty much no sense since it doesn't really follow any sort of calendar year?

Or, announce changes several months in advance, and devalue the inventory dealers are sitting on and trying to sell?

Sorry, I understand your disappointment, but I just don't see any nefarious strategy here. Particularly in the world of EV's (or partial EV's), the only real constant is change and improved performance given the infancy of the design cycle.

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So u think it is a good tactic to upgrade an engine of a model that has been few weeks in market? Obviously if you plan a facelift, would be great to combine this with a new engine, and not to announce a remarkable improvement just when new model units are delivered.

Let´s Imagine iPhone13 is presented next week, and right after first units are in the shops, Apple presents a new model with double battery, what we would say? Unfortunately the price tag is not comparable in this case

Perhaps it is the new normality as you mention, but I can’t really accept this as a good manufacturing process, but a botched one.


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So u think it is a good tactic to upgrade an engine of a model that has been few weeks in market? Obviously if you plan a facelift, would be great to combine this with a new engine, and not to announce a remarkable improvement just when new model units are delivered.

Let´s Imagine iPhone13 is presented next week, and right after first units are in the shops, Apple presents a new model with double battery, what we would say? Unfortunately the price tag is not comparable in this case

Perhaps it is the new normality as you mention, but I can’t really accept this as a good manufacturing process, but a botched one.


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MY22’s have been in production since week 22. Obviously there might have been delays for particular models, but they still had the PHEV upgrades planned for week 46. It’s relatively common knowledge that there’s often ‘fall’ refreshes. It just so happens that this year’s fall refresh is the hybrid system. This hasn’t happened since 2018.

Unfortunately this boils down to unlucky customers who bought week 22-45 MY22s. The only alternative is to delay this another 6mo-1yr, but that’s not fair to people who haven’t bought yet. As with any purchase, it sucks, but you have to sleep in the bed you’ve made
 

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Just like with computers, you can't get mad when a manufacturer announces something new. There's always... ALWAYS.. something just about to be released that will make whatever you have obsolete in some fashion. I lease for just that reason, I'm paying to borrow the car for 3 years knowing there will be something newer and shinier then. It might not be the most cost effective solution over the long term, but it lets me have something under warranty and it's only a few years at the most before I can get the new hotness.

The big makers like Ford and Chevrolet generally don't make changes in the middle of a model year unless there's a catastrophe. Volvo will make small changes mid-year without deliniating them as two different models (exception: The 2015.5 models). But there have been tweaks here and there like mentioned above.
 

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That's a bit of a two sided sword. We get stuck with stuff too. Volvo pushed a 2019 V90CC on us at the end of the model year and then launched the 2020 models that had a lower price even with all rebates considered. We are the ones that will have some in stock units whet his change happens and have to try and get someone to buy the old versions, likely by giving up money. These change can cost dealers thousands of dollars too. Dealers need to move what's on the ground, not get pumped up for what's coming in the future. I always try to be honest about any future info I know if a customer asks, but I'd be out of a job if I told every prospect why they should wait until next year.... as next year is nearly always better (unless you want cargo covers). It's not uncommon for mid year changes either.
What are you presently being told as a U.S. Volvo dealer with regard to availability for your U.S. customers of the new powertrain in the 60 and 90 Recharge series?
 

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MY22’s have been in production since week 22. Obviously there might have been delays for particular models, but they still had the PHEV upgrades planned for week 46.
Presumably week 46 is sometime in November. Is it safe to conclude that an XC90 scheduled to be built in December of this year for the U.S. market will have the upgraded powertrain regardless of whether there are unavoidable production delays?
 

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Presumably week 46 is sometime in November. Is it safe to conclude that an XC90 scheduled to be built in December of this year for the U.S. market will have the upgraded powertrain regardless of whether there are unavoidable production delays?
Sometimes during times of delays the changeover week will be pushed out or current orders will be scrapped, but it’s normally 95% of column a and 5% of column b. XC90 being built in their main plant shouldn’t have as many (/any) delays. December sounds hopeful in terms of a build week, but I can’t speak to their production planning specifically
 
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"one-pedal driving capability"?
 

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One pedal is awesome... it's what you can have on the electrics that you don't need the brake pedal unless you have a panic stop or traffic light or something harder to predict. It turns on a CEMF brake system that recharges the battery a little... like a more aggressive "B" mode on the current T8s. Works very well.

We haven't been officially told any thing... Honestly sales folks are typically the last to find out.. Volvo wants us selling what's in stock as well... but thing I have heard line up with what others have said here. I suspect the chip shortages can cause problems. I was just told today that a normal Volvo has under 400 chips... but the full electrics have 3000. Now that seems like some wasted chips in complexity... but it is what it is and there arent' enough chips... though perhaps they are using some of the more expensive, and therefore more available chips. IDK.
 

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It doesn't matter how 'complex' a part is, ANYTHING with a chip in it can have a shortage of that component. For example some of the recent shortages have effected the IHU (complex control unit in dash) to 'simple' things like the brake booster
 
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MY22’s have been in production since week 22. Obviously there might have been delays for particular models, but they still had the PHEV upgrades planned for week 46. It’s relatively common knowledge that there’s often ‘fall’ refreshes. It just so happens that this year’s fall refresh is the hybrid system. This hasn’t happened since 2018.

Unfortunately this boils down to unlucky customers who bought week 22-45 MY22s. The only alternative is to delay this another 6mo-1yr, but that’s not fair to people who haven’t bought yet. As with any purchase, it sucks, but you have to sleep in the bed you’ve made
My dealer told me 2-3 weeks ago that the delivery (to Belgium) is expected to be around 2nd week of January 2022.
I guess by factoring in the production and the shipping etc... mine may start just before week 46....

Are you 100% certain about week46?

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
My dealer told me 2-3 weeks ago that the delivery (to Belgium) is expected to be around 2nd week of January 2022.
I guess by factoring in the production and the shipping etc... mine may start just before week 46....

Are you 100% certain about week46?

Thanks
That’s not serious from a company like Volvo that your dealer cannot tell u what engine your ordered unit will have. I am so sorry but this should be more transparent and Volvo is not managing it well.

We’re talking about +70% on electric autonomy and you place an order for a +60k car that dealer has no clue?

I expect your unit should have new train mostly because this upgrade it is already posted in website, new Volvos 60/90 series announce 79km electric autonomy


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That’s not serious from a company like Volvo that your dealer cannot tell u what engine your ordered unit will have. I am so sorry but this should be more transparent and Volvo is not managing it well.

We’re talking about +70% on electric autonomy and you place an order for a +60k car that dealer has no clue?

I expect your unit should have new train mostly because this upgrade it is already posted in website, new Volvos 60/90 series announce 79km electric autonomy


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Sorry, not to defend the dealer, but I called him and he said they are waiting the production schedule which will show them exactly where the cut-off will be.

He said "we got the news on Thursday and we expect the list on Monday or Tuesday".

I agree the difference is huge, it is a considerable bump in the mileage but also in Belgium it reduces the taxes drastically - both are huge differences for me.
I'll let you know when I hear on Monday or Tuesday (believe me I'll be at the dealer if not hear anything back Tuesday around noon).
 

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At least among the seasoned Volvo enthusiasts, it is common knowledge that Volvo has early build and late build model year vehicles.

The break between early build and late build is typically structure week 46 to week 48 - usually latter part of November (e.g., based on reading of different markets' webpages and reference materials - owners manuals, technical journals, service bulletins, parts bulletins, et al).

Here is an example from the UK website:
Font Parallel Number Screenshot Terrestrial plant


In the US, Volvo Cars does not market or really acknowledge early builds v. late builds. Thus, it is really helpful to know, but then you really do not know the details until after they happened. For example, my car was order in May 2015, built in Oct. 2015, and mid-year changes occurred around Week 48, 2015. So it is in a continuous improvement production.
 
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Here's link to another post w/ manual dates, below that is extract for XC90 SPA:


Font Rectangle Screenshot Number Parallel


I think I see two scenarios happening w/ MY changeover:

-- Traditional MY changeover in the fall, XC90 above shows week 46 for MY16-18 as do all the other examples for MY changeover in fall at that link. I've read upcoming PHEV upgrade happens week 46-47, so very consistent.

-- Early MY changeover in the spring, usually week 17, or 20-22; that is almost always followed by an update in the fall, again week 46. Only exception I spotted was S60 MY18 which launched CY17 week 17, but then wasn't updated until MY19 in CY18 week 46.

I expect to be in the market 2H CY23 for MY24. If the MY changeover happens ~week 46 then no worries. But if it happens early, ~week 17-20-ish, I wonder if I should goal-seek to a late-CY build, soon after week 46? Plan is to buy and drive it forever, so catching one more round of updates might be worthwhile? That also allows two years run time for new PHEV battery/ERAD. (But I wouldn't want to wait beyond end-CY23 for build, certainly wouldn't wait for MY25 even if turnover is early-CY24.)
 
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[Updates]
[@rfkuehn, I think we are closely aligned.To summarize what I explained below, the new model year (early) starts in late April and the mid-year (late) starts in late November.]

Here is some more "armchair" insight from an outsider - having become familiar with ordering, production, delivery of SPA XC90 for MY16 and beyond. I do not know the inside scope and some things likely have changed or are changing since MY16 (e.g., SC plant going into operation, BEV production).

Model Year v. Calendar Year
  1. A Volvo model year overlaps portions of two calendar years, such as:
    • MY21 Early is produced in the ~ Apr-Nov. 2020 timeframe.
    • MY21 Late is produced in the Nov.-April 2021 timeframe
  2. The actual week for the start of a new model year product can vary somewhat due to model, factory location, world affairs, business decisions. epidemics, et al.
  3. Volvo typically starts its new model year production in late April.
    • Weeks 17, 18, and 19 are common start weeks in late April of each calendar year) for the so-called early version for that model and model year.
  4. Volvo typically starts its [mid-year] model year production in late November.
    • Weeks 46, 47, and 48 are common start weeks in late November of each calendar year) for the so-called late or [mid-year] version for that model and model year.
  5. The designation of early and late versions of a model year may have started with MY19 - at least for the SPA XC90 for the UK. Regardless, look at your build/structure month and year on the B pillar of your driver door. (same image as @rfkuech posted above.
If one knows their vehicle type, engine type/desc, structure/build month/year, and chassis number, the TJs, Service Bulletins, et al are more helpful. Whether you have an early or late build, the structure/build month/ year are indicative, but a build month of November is ambiguous unless you know the exact cutover week. [I think it is safe to assume that most November builds are "early" (i.e.,three full weeks) out of ~ four).]

If nothing else, I hope this useful and maybe even entertaining. 😂
 

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There are some serious Volvo enthusiasts here!!!

All very interesting info.

Question: does anyone know how long it takes for a XC60 to be built?

I am trying to reverse engineer the timeline, my car is expected in Belgium mid Jan 2022. Any idea?

Anyhow tomorrow or Tuesday dealer will confirm as well. If current battery, I'll still try to get the new one...
 

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There are some serious Volvo enthusiasts here!!!

All very interesting info.

Question: does anyone know how long it takes for a XC60 to be built?

I am trying to reverse engineer the timeline, my car is expected in Belgium mid Jan 2022. Any idea?

Anyhow tomorrow or Tuesday dealer will confirm as well. If current battery, I'll still try to get the new one...
There have been some threads on that around the SPA XC90. Generally, you should assume a build can take up to one day to one week - depending on the configuration. A base model Momentum more like a day, whereas a fully loaded T8 Inscription up to a week.

This all assumes that there are no inventory component parts shortage and the factory is not closed down (e.g., summer holidays, CPU shortage). I doubt that the 60 models are significantly shorter than the 90s. There are threads/stickies in the that go into great detail over the years with factory orders - both OSD and non-OSD:
 

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There have been some threads on that around the SPA XC90. Generally, you should assume a build can take up to one day to one week - depending on the configuration. A base model Momentum more like a day, whereas a fully loaded T8 Inscription up to a week.

This all assumes that there are no inventory component parts shortage and the factory is not closed down (e.g., summer holidays, CPU shortage). I doubt that the 60 models are significantly shorter than the 90s. There are threads/stickies in the that go into great detail over the years with factory orders - both OSD and non-OSD:
It doesn’t take any more/less time to build a particular model in the same plant. I think what you meant is that slots are structured by how complex the car is. For example T8’s require an extra 20-30min of overall build time. Therefore not every car back to back can be a hybrid. Whereas a run of the mill powertrain can be slotted whenever.

For my last build, it went through Final Assembly within a matter of hours (since Torslanda [XC60/90, V90] outputs every 57sec 24/7). It was then exported 4 days after Factory Complete
Font Number Circle
 
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[Updates]
[@rfkuehn, I think we are closely aligned. To summarize what I explained below, the new model year (early) starts in late April and the mid-year (late) starts in late November.]

Model Year v. Calendar Year
  1. A Volvo model year overlaps portions of two calendar years, such as:
    • MY21 Early is produced in the ~ Apr-Nov. 2020 timeframe.
    • MY21 Late is produced in the Nov.-April 2021 timeframe
  2. The actual week for the start of a new model year product can vary somewhat due to model, factory location, world affairs, business decisions. epidemics, et al.
  3. Volvo typically starts its new model year production in late April.
    • Weeks 17, 18, and 19 are common start weeks in late April of each calendar year) for the so-called early version for that model and model year.
  4. Volvo typically starts its [mid-year] model year production in late November.
    • Weeks 46, 47, and 48 are common start weeks in late November of each calendar year) for the so-called late or [mid-year] version for that model and model year.
  5. The designation of early and late versions of a model year may have started with MY19 - at least for the SPA XC90 for the UK. Regardless, look at your build/structure month and year on the B pillar of your driver door. (same image as @rfkuech posted above.

If nothing else, I hope this useful and maybe even entertaining. 😂
This is great info and most entertaining. I haven't even read the sports page yet today.

Let's say you'd like a "late" MY build, assume ~week 46-48 - when might the production plan be locked in? Perhaps coincide w/ "early" MY changeover in ~week 17-19? Or (much) earlier than that? And how sophisticated/cooperative is the ordering system to time a build for an order? Is it blind luck, so you must time your order submission and cross your fingers?

Alternatively, is it possible to order promptly for a MY yet specify a build no-earlier-than date, then you go into a cue and wait for a build slot after that date? For example, if you wanted MY22 "late", could you cite week 46-47-48 or later and just wait your turn?

And for Volvo, what's the first day of a given week of production? Monday?
 
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