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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A new approach to an aftermarket intercooler for the Polestar has been developed by a custom fabrication shop in Canada. The owner of the @bluebeast has worked closely with @marksautoperformance to develop a high flow IC that mounts in the same position as the OEM unit.

Mark's provided this explanation of the design:

Built with the most advanced vacuum brazed aluminum alloy, and utilizing bar-and-plate construction and a unique fin design; our Peak Efficiency Air-to-Air intercooler cores offer exceptional cooling performance while minimizing pressure drop. Everything in our Peak Performance Air-to-Air intercooler core, from the strenght of its braze sheets, side-bars and end-plates, channel count, to its fin density and design, has been meticulously specified to give you the most cooling-efficient and power-producing intercooler core in the market.

Specifications: high flow:389 CFM, light weight: 24 lbs., Price: TBD (I am predicting $900-$1100 USD. This item is not inexpensive, low production high performance items never are, but you also get what you pay for.)

What I really like about this design is that they fitted an upgrade into the same space as the OEM unit. This preserves the area above the bumper bar for mounting auxiliary coolers and the IC does not block air flow to the upper radiator section.

Contact marksautoperformance on Facebook If you are interested in this product: https://www.facebook.com/search/top/?q=marksautoperformance&epa=SEARCH_BOX


FB_IMG_1561813348652[1] by lcfpolestar, on Flickr

FB_IMG_1561813360805[1] by lcfpolestar, on Flickr

FB_IMG_1561813338272[1] by lcfpolestar, on Flickr

Screenshot_20190630-140047[1] by lcfpolestar, on Flickr

Screenshot_20190630-140020[1] by lcfpolestar, on Flickr
 

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Very interesting! I’m curious how it compares with the DO88 fmic many of us have been running. While I understand the rationale behind the design, I’m curious about some other details such as cooling area and comparisons between flow and intake temps if any such data exists. If not, some subjective impressions would be useful as well. While the pressure drop improvement makes sense, my understanding of that benefit is that it should improve throttle response, correct? I never noticed any loss of throttle response on my T6 when I added the big DO88 product. In fact, throttle response seemed sharper to me, presumably since lower IATs allowed timing to advance more aggressively, theoretically allowing for more rapid spool and potentially more than compensating for the pressure drop situation (sorry if I’ve butchered my attempt at tech talk, haha).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Very interesting! I’m curious how it compares with the DO88 fmic many of us have been running. While I understand the rationale behind the design, I’m curious about some other details such as cooling area and comparisons between flow and intake temps if any such data exists. If not, some subjective impressions would be useful as well. While the pressure drop improvement makes sense, my understanding of that benefit is that it should improve throttle response, correct? I never noticed any loss of throttle response on my T6 when I added the big DO88 product. In fact, throttle response seemed sharper to me, presumably since lower IATs allowed timing to advance more aggressively, theoretically allowing for more rapid spool and potentially more than compensating for the pressure drop situation (sorry if I’ve butchered my attempt at tech talk, haha).
I can't really provide any additional insights to the design over the info I have provided. Just giving it another overview: compact, high flow, light weight, preserves OEM layout.
 

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In for dyno numbers. I know the P2R IC design is pretty poor so upgrading that was a big help. Uncertain if the P* suffers from the same issue.
 

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In for dyno numbers. I know the P2R IC design is pretty poor so upgrading that was a big help. Uncertain if the P* suffers from the same issue.
While I’m positive an intercooler upgrade is beneficial on P3 cars, I take dyno numbers with a big grain of salt with these cars. There are so many variables at play that it can be hard to attribute any specific gain or lack thereof to one product. For example: When does the car get tested, right after a part was installed or months later (before or after the ecu has had a chance to adapt fully)? Does it have more power right after a part was added, or does the ecu conspire to dial out the added power over time either trying to maintain stock torque targets or with fuel trims adapting over time? Does it make more power power after the ecu has had time to adapt, or less/ the same power as stock after adaptation? What were the weather/ atmospheric conditions during baseline compared with the day of testing a new mod? I’m always curious if a car that makes more power early on when a mod is installed (dyno tested immediately after installation) maintains that power over time.

Also: An intercooler won’t necessarily make more power on its own, at least on these cars where the stock ecu tries to exercise tight control over output...at least under the conditions you are likely to see at a shop on Dyno Day. You will likely need other supporting hardware and a hotter state of tune to see big results, which the fmic might support, but is it really the cause of that power or is it helping those other mods reach their potential? Because I’m pretty sure it would need those mods and likely an upgraded tune to see any kind of substantial jump in power on a dyno when adding the fmic.

On the other hand, any jump in power that the fmic helps unlock is certainly valid and helpful for the user. I guess all this is a roundabout way of saying a fmic may or may not make power on its own, but it’s part of a holistic build where everything in that build contributes to a gain on the dyno or a lack thereof. It doesn’t necessarily mean it adds power or doesn’t add power, but I guarantee NOT having an upgraded fmic will hold you back on the street on a hot day, or after repeated runs at the drag strip, or doing a triple digit highway pull, or when sitting in summer gridlock.

Sorry to go slightly off topic. I’m very curious how the car responds to this new fmic. Oscar II’s car is at a state of tune and subjected to exactly the sort of driving conditions where a fmic upgrade should help. Will it make power? Maybe or maybe not on a few dyno runs, but more importantly, it will help stave off heat soak and let him continue having access to that power under hard driving and non ideal conditions. This is important not only for maintaining performance, but also for the health and longevity of his car.

My own DO88 intercooler didn’t make much of a difference in measured output on my T6 (seen as times and trap speeds) at the drag strip, but it certainly helped make my car feel stronger and have better throttle response on the street, especially in the heat of summer when the car felt like it was running in crisp Fall air instead of being a dog. And it was part of an eventual mod progression that let me run a 12.9 at 109, which wouldn’t have been possible with just the fmic but also wouldn’t have been possible without an upgraded fmic added to my group of mods.

TL;DR it might not make big power numbers on a dyno, but guaranteed it improves the car in a variety of very functional ways like helping you maintain the power you already have over time or in warm weather, and helping your other mods live up to their full potential.
 

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On the 2.0L the intercooler definately heatsoaks if you drive around at low speeds in Sport mode. Which makes sense cause you have low airspeed through the IC and high RPM from the turbo.

Though like you said i doubt a bigger IC would make a big difference in terms of doing 1/4 mile or higher times. When the IC heatsoaks on my car its utterly slow, like really bad feels like driving a non-turbo 2.0L car.
 

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Im certainly interested to see how this new cooler works out. That said, I still consider the do88 to be an improvement. I drove mine for about 6 months before I put it on, and on hot days, around town esp, heat soak is very noticeable.Fells down 50hp atleast if u poke around town and then get on it. Now the car feels pretty much the same all the time.For that alone its worth it. Now one thing I did do, when I put the do88 on, is I used some hvac foam around the intercooler between it and the condenser. This way the fan pulls air through it, with letting any air sneak around it. I tried it with and without, and it made quite a difference. The thing with the stock one is, its not sealed well at all to the rad so when fan is on, very little air gets drawn through it. Fine at 60mph but not so at lower speeds. The biggest thing I REALLY don't like is how the do88 mounts to the tiny little mounts on the rad. Ya it has those upper brackets, but still, makes me nervous as its very heavy. That said no one has posted of rad issues so maybe I'm worrying about nothing. Anyone inquired about a cost on these new intercooler?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Im certainly interested to see how this new cooler works out. That said, I still consider the do88 to be an improvement. I drove mine for about 6 months before I put it on, and on hot days, around town esp, heat soak is very noticeable.Fells down 50hp atleast if u poke around town and then get on it. Now the car feels pretty much the same all the time.For that alone its worth it. Now one thing I did do, when I put the do88 on, is I used some hvac foam around the intercooler between it and the condenser. This way the fan pulls air through it, with letting any air sneak around it. I tried it with and without, and it made quite a difference. The thing with the stock one is, its not sealed well at all to the rad so when fan is on, very little air gets drawn through it. Fine at 60mph but not so at lower speeds. The biggest thing I REALLY don't like is how the do88 mounts to the tiny little mounts on the rad. Ya it has those upper brackets, but still, makes me nervous as its very heavy. That said no one has posted of rad issues so maybe I'm worrying about nothing. Anyone inquired about a cost on these new intercooler?
Re: price. Roughly $900-$1200. The price is somewhat dependent on whether it's a single unit for a single customer or a multi-unit order. Contact Mark's Performance for a personalized quote.
 

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A new approach to an aftermarket intercooler for the Polestar has been developed by a custom fabrication shop in Canada. The owner of the @bluebeast has worked closely with @marksautoperformance to develop a high flow IC that mounts in the same position as the OEM unit.

Mark's provided this explanation of the design:

Built with the most advanced vacuum brazed aluminum alloy, and utilizing bar-and-plate construction and a unique fin design; our Peak Efficiency Air-to-Air intercooler cores offer exceptional cooling performance while minimizing pressure drop. Everything in our Peak Performance Air-to-Air intercooler core, from the strenght of its braze sheets, side-bars and end-plates, channel count, to its fin density and design, has been meticulously specified to give you the most cooling-efficient and power-producing intercooler core in the market.

Specifications: high flow:389 CFM, light weight: 24 lbs., Price: TBD (I am predicting $900-$1100 USD. This item is not inexpensive, low production high performance items never are, but you also get what you pay for.)

What I really like about this design is that they fitted an upgrade into the same space as the OEM unit. This preserves the area above the bumper bar for mounting auxiliary coolers and the IC does not block air flow to the upper radiator section.

Contact marksautoperformance on Facebook If you are interested in this product: https://www.facebook.com/search/top/?q=marksautoperformance&epa=SEARCH_BOX


FB_IMG_1561813348652[1] by lcfpolestar, on Flickr

FB_IMG_1561813360805[1] by lcfpolestar, on Flickr

FB_IMG_1561813338272[1] by lcfpolestar, on Flickr

Screenshot_20190630-140047[1] by lcfpolestar, on Flickr

Screenshot_20190630-140020[1] by lcfpolestar, on Flickr
Core seems pretty thin, compared to something like the Heico one


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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A new approach to an aftermarket intercooler for the Polestar has been developed by a custom fabrication shop in Canada. The owner of the @bluebeast has worked closely with @marksautoperformance to develop a high flow IC that mounts in the same position as the OEM unit.

Mark's provided this explanation of the design:

Built with the most advanced vacuum brazed aluminum alloy, and utilizing bar-and-plate construction and a unique fin design; our Peak Efficiency Air-to-Air intercooler cores offer exceptional cooling performance while minimizing pressure drop. Everything in our Peak Performance Air-to-Air intercooler core, from the strenght of its braze sheets, side-bars and end-plates, channel count, to its fin density and design, has been meticulously specified to give you the most cooling-efficient and power-producing intercooler core in the market.

Specifications: high flow:389 CFM, light weight: 24 lbs., Price: TBD (I am predicting $900-$1100 USD. This item is not inexpensive, low production high performance items never are, but you also get what you pay for.)

What I really like about this design is that they fitted an upgrade into the same space as the OEM unit. This preserves the area above the bumper bar for mounting auxiliary coolers and the IC does not block air flow to the upper radiator section.

Contact marksautoperformance on Facebook If you are interested in this product: https://www.facebook.com/search/top/?q=marksautoperformance&epa=SEARCH_BOX


FB_IMG_1561813348652[1] by lcfpolestar, on Flickr

FB_IMG_1561813360805[1] by lcfpolestar, on Flickr

FB_IMG_1561813338272[1] by lcfpolestar, on Flickr

Screenshot_20190630-140047[1] by lcfpolestar, on Flickr

Screenshot_20190630-140020[1] by lcfpolestar, on Flickr
Core seems pretty thin, compared to something like the Heico one


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Heico has a fmic option for P3 cars? That’s the first I’ve heard of this.
 

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While I’m positive an intercooler upgrade is beneficial on P3 cars, I take dyno numbers with a big grain of salt with these cars. There are so many variables at play that it can be hard to attribute any specific gain or lack thereof to one product. For example: When does the car get tested, right after a part was installed or months later (before or after the ecu has had a chance to adapt fully)? Does it have more power right after a part was added, or does the ecu conspire to dial out the added power over time either trying to maintain stock torque targets or with fuel trims adapting over time? Does it make more power power after the ecu has had time to adapt, or less/ the same power as stock after adaptation? What were the weather/ atmospheric conditions during baseline compared with the day of testing a new mod? I’m always curious if a car that makes more power early on when a mod is installed (dyno tested immediately after installation) maintains that power over time.

Also: An intercooler won’t necessarily make more power on its own, at least on these cars where the stock ecu tries to exercise tight control over output...at least under the conditions you are likely to see at a shop on Dyno Day. You will likely need other supporting hardware and a hotter state of tune to see big results, which the fmic might support, but is it really the cause of that power or is it helping those other mods reach their potential? Because I’m pretty sure it would need those mods and likely an upgraded tune to see any kind of substantial jump in power on a dyno when adding the fmic.

On the other hand, any jump in power that the fmic helps unlock is certainly valid and helpful for the user. I guess all this is a roundabout way of saying a fmic may or may not make power on its own, but it’s part of a holistic build where everything in that build contributes to a gain on the dyno or a lack thereof. It doesn’t necessarily mean it adds power or doesn’t add power, but I guarantee NOT having an upgraded fmic will hold you back on the street on a hot day, or after repeated runs at the drag strip, or doing a triple digit highway pull, or when sitting in summer gridlock.

Sorry to go slightly off topic. I’m very curious how the car responds to this new fmic. Oscar II’s car is at a state of tune and subjected to exactly the sort of driving conditions where a fmic upgrade should help. Will it make power? Maybe or maybe not on a few dyno runs, but more importantly, it will help stave off heat soak and let him continue having access to that power under hard driving and non ideal conditions. This is important not only for maintaining performance, but also for the health and longevity of his car.

My own DO88 intercooler didn’t make much of a difference in measured output on my T6 (seen as times and trap speeds) at the drag strip, but it certainly helped make my car feel stronger and have better throttle response on the street, especially in the heat of summer when the car felt like it was running in crisp Fall air instead of being a dog. And it was part of an eventual mod progression that let me run a 12.9 at 109, which wouldn’t have been possible with just the fmic but also wouldn’t have been possible without an upgraded fmic added to my group of mods.

TL;DR it might not make big power numbers on a dyno, but guaranteed it improves the car in a variety of very functional ways like helping you maintain the power you already have over time or in warm weather, and helping your other mods live up to their full potential.
Agreed. And I acquiesce to the fact that I provided the lazy response instead of expounding on what I meant by the benefits of this IC. I'm sure it will help but, as you state, in different ways (preventing heatsoak, lower intake temps, better flow, etc) that might not be immediately discernable without the assistance of a tune.
 

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While I’m positive an intercooler upgrade is beneficial on P3 cars, I take dyno numbers with a big grain of salt with these cars. There are so many variables at play that it can be hard to attribute any specific gain or lack thereof to one product. For example: When does the car get tested, right after a part was installed or months later (before or after the ecu has had a chance to adapt fully)? Does it have more power right after a part was added, or does the ecu conspire to dial out the added power over time either trying to maintain stock torque targets or with fuel trims adapting over time? Does it make more power power after the ecu has had time to adapt, or less/ the same power as stock after adaptation? What were the weather/ atmospheric conditions during baseline compared with the day of testing a new mod? I’m always curious if a car that makes more power early on when a mod is installed (dyno tested immediately after installation) maintains that power over time.

Also: An intercooler won’t necessarily make more power on its own, at least on these cars where the stock ecu tries to exercise tight control over output...at least under the conditions you are likely to see at a shop on Dyno Day. You will likely need other supporting hardware and a hotter state of tune to see big results, which the fmic might support, but is it really the cause of that power or is it helping those other mods reach their potential? Because I’m pretty sure it would need those mods and likely an upgraded tune to see any kind of substantial jump in power on a dyno when adding the fmic.

On the other hand, any jump in power that the fmic helps unlock is certainly valid and helpful for the user. I guess all this is a roundabout way of saying a fmic may or may not make power on its own, but it’s part of a holistic build where everything in that build contributes to a gain on the dyno or a lack thereof. It doesn’t necessarily mean it adds power or doesn’t add power, but I guarantee NOT having an upgraded fmic will hold you back on the street on a hot day, or after repeated runs at the drag strip, or doing a triple digit highway pull, or when sitting in summer gridlock.

Sorry to go slightly off topic. I’m very curious how the car responds to this new fmic. Oscar II’s car is at a state of tune and subjected to exactly the sort of driving conditions where a fmic upgrade should help. Will it make power? Maybe or maybe not on a few dyno runs, but more importantly, it will help stave off heat soak and let him continue having access to that power under hard driving and non ideal conditions. This is important not only for maintaining performance, but also for the health and longevity of his car.

My own DO88 intercooler didn’t make much of a difference in measured output on my T6 (seen as times and trap speeds) at the drag strip, but it certainly helped make my car feel stronger and have better throttle response on the street, especially in the heat of summer when the car felt like it was running in crisp Fall air instead of being a dog. And it was part of an eventual mod progression that let me run a 12.9 at 109, which wouldn’t have been possible with just the fmic but also wouldn’t have been possible without an upgraded fmic added to my group of mods.

TL;DR it might not make big power numbers on a dyno, but guaranteed it improves the car in a variety of very functional ways like helping you maintain the power you already have over time or in warm weather, and helping your other mods live up to their full potential.
Agreed. And I acquiesce to the fact that I provided the lazy response instead of expounding on what I meant by the benefits of this IC. I'm sure it will help but, as you state, in different ways (preventing heatsoak, lower intake temps, better flow, etc) that might not be immediately discernable without the assistance of a tune.
Exactly! I was mildly disappointed that my perception of improved street performance after adding the D088 intercooler didn’t make much difference at the drag strip measured on two different days, but that also doesn’t mean my perception of the change is invalid. I know the car well enough to know that it delivers its best performance more consistently and is less hampered by warm weather or heat soak than before. If it doesn’t actually add power, it certainly helps me keep the power I already have, and not just under ideal conditions.
 

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While I’m positive an intercooler upgrade is beneficial on P3 cars, I take dyno numbers with a big grain of salt with these cars. There are so many variables at play that it can be hard to attribute any specific gain or lack thereof to one product. For example: When does the car get tested, right after a part was installed or months later (before or after the ecu has had a chance to adapt fully)? Does it have more power right after a part was added, or does the ecu conspire to dial out the added power over time either trying to maintain stock torque targets or with fuel trims adapting over time? Does it make more power power after the ecu has had time to adapt, or less/ the same power as stock after adaptation? What were the weather/ atmospheric conditions during baseline compared with the day of testing a new mod? I’m always curious if a car that makes more power early on when a mod is installed (dyno tested immediately after installation) maintains that power over time.

Also: An intercooler won’t necessarily make more power on its own, at least on these cars where the stock ecu tries to exercise tight control over output...at least under the conditions you are likely to see at a shop on Dyno Day. You will likely need other supporting hardware and a hotter state of tune to see big results, which the fmic might support, but is it really the cause of that power or is it helping those other mods reach their potential? Because I’m pretty sure it would need those mods and likely an upgraded tune to see any kind of substantial jump in power on a dyno when adding the fmic.

On the other hand, any jump in power that the fmic helps unlock is certainly valid and helpful for the user. I guess all this is a roundabout way of saying a fmic may or may not make power on its own, but it’s part of a holistic build where everything in that build contributes to a gain on the dyno or a lack thereof. It doesn’t necessarily mean it adds power or doesn’t add power, but I guarantee NOT having an upgraded fmic will hold you back on the street on a hot day, or after repeated runs at the drag strip, or doing a triple digit highway pull, or when sitting in summer gridlock.

Sorry to go slightly off topic. I’m very curious how the car responds to this new fmic. Oscar II’s car is at a state of tune and subjected to exactly the sort of driving conditions where a fmic upgrade should help. Will it make power? Maybe or maybe not on a few dyno runs, but more importantly, it will help stave off heat soak and let him continue having access to that power under hard driving and non ideal conditions. This is important not only for maintaining performance, but also for the health and longevity of his car.

My own DO88 intercooler didn’t make much of a difference in measured output on my T6 (seen as times and trap speeds) at the drag strip, but it certainly helped make my car feel stronger and have better throttle response on the street, especially in the heat of summer when the car felt like it was running in crisp Fall air instead of being a dog. And it was part of an eventual mod progression that let me run a 12.9 at 109, which wouldn’t have been possible with just the fmic but also wouldn’t have been possible without an upgraded fmic added to my group of mods.

TL;DR it might not make big power numbers on a dyno, but guaranteed it improves the car in a variety of very functional ways like helping you maintain the power you already have over time or in warm weather, and helping your other mods live up to their full potential.
Agreed. And I acquiesce to the fact that I provided the lazy response instead of expounding on what I meant by the benefits of this IC. I'm sure it will help but, as you state, in different ways (preventing heatsoak, lower intake temps, better flow, etc) that might not be immediately discernable without the assistance of a tune.
Exactly! I was mildly disappointed that my perception of improved street performance after adding the D088 intercooler didn’t make much difference at the drag strip measured on two different days, but that also doesn’t mean my perception of the change is invalid. I know the car well enough to know that it delivers its best performance more consistently and is less hampered by warm weather or heat soak than before. If it doesn’t actually add power, it certainly helps me keep the power I already have, and not just under ideal conditions.

I do wonder what metrics will be used to compare this new fmic option with the known quantity from DO88. It does look like a nice piece, obscuring less of the radiator than the DO88, but does it match the heat dissipating surface area of the DO88? Is it more or less efficient both in terms of cooling and in terms of internal airflow? How is the fit and ease of installation? These are all factors that will be talking points when comparing the two, or comparing the new one with the stock one, whether or not the dyno shows anything noteworthy.
 

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Very interesting! I’m curious how it compares with the DO88 fmic many of us have been running.
yep, show the actual numbers, not what was just given to you from a Bell spec sheet.


unfortunately we'll probably never see the numbers and graphs a proper shop like do88 provides.
 
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