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My understanding is that cars built for the US will only have US/North American maps loaded. Is there any way to get European maps loaded for the time that you are there for the OSD delivery, without spending a lot of money?
 

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you can email [email protected] and see if they have a set you can borrow
Just to clarify Bob's post...

There are a limited number of portable Garmin navigation units at the Volvo Factory Delivery Center that for loan to Overseas Delivery customers who are picking up their car at the factory and dropping it off at the factory. These units are available on a first come - first serve basis.

Unfortunately you can no longer borrow European map data for a factory installed navigation system to use in your new Volvo car while you are in Europe.
 

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I purposely did not order built-in nav.

I picked up a Garmin 2370 that includes US and European maps, lifetime traffic (US and Europe). for a few hundred $US. It will also 'talk' to the Eco HD Garmin unitl allowing me to get all kinds of information about engine status...
 

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DO NOT rely on getting a GPS from the the FDC!! They have very few units [last year there were 3] and the likelihood of getting one is slim next to nothing. You really NEED a GPS if you are going to drive [we even got lost going from FDC to hotel!!] anywhere.
 

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We just back having picked up a 2012 XC90 with navigation. Looked into the Eu maps in the car system - too complex to get that ordered up and then replaced with North American maps when you get home. Best to just take it the way the factory builds it for the market its being delivered to ...

We had a Garmin Nuvi - fairly recent vintage - and it cost something like $80 to get the most recent Eu maps loaded into the unit. Worked just fine sitting on the centre of the dash ... the hardest thing was to try to understand how the (Americanised) voice was pronouncing the names of streets when it spoke directions.

So my recommendation would be to get a GPS if you don't have one ... and if you do, either way, get European maps loaded into it. And another helpful tip: pre-load all your waypoints (destinations) such that you are not wasting time trying to enter the info when you're actually there. We loaded the Goteborg Radisson hotel, the FDC, other hotels and places we wanted to stop. Made it real easy to just tap where we wanted to go!
 

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We are picking up XC60 T6 on July 4th. without nav. so I purchased Garmin 3790 and European maps to take on the trip with us. We will take ferry to Germany, then straight to Prague for 4 days then to Croatia for a week, ferry to Italy and to France for few days. Leaving car in Paris for shipment back home.
My question is can we, while at FDC taking the tour, have the proper Volvo holder installed or we will have to have it done by the dealer upon return?
 

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Jarmark: I'm going with an after-market GPS mount because I want my co-pilot/navigator/wife to be able to access the unit while I'm driving. With the Factory mount, only the driver can get to it.

I have the 2370 which came with European Maps (and will connect to the Garmin ECO HD). Except some weirdness with not being able to find addresses within France when outside the country, it worked fine. I could find cities in France but not street addresses. It worked fine once *in* France. I've duplicated the problem at home. The issue is that it wanted a state/province and offered up 4 choices, none of which matched a province shown on my paper map (i.e., no Normandy).

I didn't have that problem with other countries and have not reported it to Garmin yet (3 week OSD trip, haven't been home 3 weeks yet).
 

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Though GPS seems handy sometimes, I worry that the younger generation will lose the ability to read an old-fashioned paper map. GPS is nothing more than technology and technology can fail; I know some people that do not run down to their local grocery store without turning on their GPS. for them I think GPS has become a crutch.
I've ordered a very nice Norway Supertouring road atlas that is wire-bound from Amazon, I think it will do just fine.
 

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For 30 years we have relied on paper maps for in-car navigation assistance. Granted I now try to print out Google map directions which is helpful as long as one stays on the course that Google provides but becomes useless once one misses a turn or two. If I am the navigation assistant I can juggle several paper maps and we usually get to our destination with an occasional detour. However if my wife is the designated map reader she invariably becomes exasperated since she has no confidence in her map reading skills. She is usually in a panic to figure out where we should turn or where we are at the moment. I have often had to pull over and inspect the map myself and pinpoint our location to figure out if we are on or off course. Once my internal compass has been set, so to speak, and the paper map properly oriented it all seems easy but there are plenty of folks (male & female) who find map reading and spatial thinking to be very hard to master.

We did order the Garmin GPS option for our OSD Volvo pick up this Summer. It will be mounted on the A pillar stalk but it should easily pop off to hand it to the passenger. The GPS will show my wife a correctly oriented map with our location marked. It may help her learn to enjoy map reading.

Anyone had a positive or negatiive experience going from paper maps to GPS?
 

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I still carry paper maps (and use them) although now largely as a backup and cross check to the GPS. I still ask "why is it routing us *that* way?" compared to what looks like a better route on a map.

The map is also handier looking at larger areas -- more detail than can be seen on the small GPS screen. We've had several "hey, X isn't too far out of the way, let's go there" experiences with paper maps.

The biggest negatives I've seen with GPS:
1) they're electronic, they seem to fault (or lose satellite lock) when I need them most
2) they don't take into account traffic lights when figuring travel time and "fastest route"
3) when they take traffic into consideration for routing, an area with no traffic information is treated as having no traffic at all (a real bother when the alternate is actually in worse shape than the traffic-reported-normal route).


I use GPS when I'm in the woods (handheld, Garmin Etrex Vista), in the Car (Garmin 23xx series in both cars), and when I'm flying (Garmin G1000 or Apollo - now owned by Garmin). But I still have paper maps and a compass.
 

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We will be driving through Sweden, Norway and Denmark on this OSD. I have loaded the Scandinavia maps on our Garmin (about $70.00). In addition I have printed out driving directions from google maps for our main driving, from one city to another. Lastly we will have paper maps of the countries and the major cities. Hopefully, we won’t get lost or make too many wrong turns.

One of the main reasons for using the GPS is the street names and roundabouts. Being that the street names are foreign to us, getting queues when to turn should help get us to where we are going. I have found that the Garmin tends to keep you on main roads, but if you do deviate it ‘recalculates’. The printed driving directions will be used mainly as a cross check on where the Garmin is routing us. They are more or less a security blanket that we should end up where we want to be. Paper maps of the countries will give us the big picture of where we are and where we are headed. They will also show what might be interesting places to deter to that might not be too far to get to. We can then rely on the GPS ‘recalculating’ to get us back on track to our destination.

One tip I read on the forum, was to pre-load address of hotels and other places you will be driving to. We plan on doing that. Don’t want to take the chance of finding out when we are driving to some place that there is problem with loading the address. If nothing else it will be something to do while waiting in the lounge prior to the flight.
 

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Hey folks,

How about using an iPad for navigation instead? Why keep buying more hardware when it is really about the apps? Check this out:
http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-13746_7-57399243-48/five-navigation-apps-for-your-new-ipad-4g-roundup/
There is a simple reason not to...$50/mo service charge for the cell phone connectivity...

Plus, cell tower navigation is not that accurate as true GPS one...

...and iPhone is kind of small...

...and cell phone charges abroad...

...and and and...

But any smart phone with unlimited data plan domestically is a good alternative to the dedicated device...


Make sense?
 

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There is a simple reason not to...$50/mo service charge for the cell phone connectivity...

Plus, cell tower navigation is not that accurate as true GPS one...

...and iPhone is kind of small...

...and cell phone charges abroad...

...and and and...

But any smart phone with unlimited data plan domestically is a good alternative to the dedicated device...


Make sense?
Hmm, I looked into this. I was hoping to use the iPad not the iPhone. According to a poster on the Apple website, you do not need to have cellular service:
"I have an iPad2 w/3G which I got specifically for the GPS Functionality. I do not have a data plan for the device. So with data disabled and no wifi, out in the boonies, the GPS works just fine. the iPad 2 with wifi only does not have the GPS functionality, as it requires the phone chip. I am not sure if the same is true for the iPad 3 but I would assume so."


 

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I do not know if iPad has built-in GPS receiver. I doubt so, but would be pleasantly surprised if it does. I have iPad 2 with WiFi.
 

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Interesting. When I took delivery in Munich, BMW uploaded Euro Maps on the navi and then uploaded US Maps when the car came stateside.
 

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Yep, No independent GPS receiver in iPad, as I expected...

http://support.apple.com/kb/HT4995


Digital compass only - with WiFi and
Assisted GPS and GLONASS - with cellular...which means that the location service is driven by the cell signal receiver and Russian positional satelites ...

Hence my previous comment stands - navigation with iPad is an expensive proposition...requires cell services...
 

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I agree, 'Location Services' will work better with a cellular connection. You might be able to get the same functionality out of your iPad if you tether it to a phone with GPS, but that could be tricky.

iPad with cellular will still work without a cellular connection; although slowly and accuracy may be poor. I suppose a dedicated navigational device has better GPS satelite detectors. I can get cellular for one month only and then turn it off, so that is what I am going to do for big trips. I am going to order the Tom Tom app so I have the maps, and can plot a trip, even if my exact location is not certain, when I am away from cell towers.

$129 more for iPad with cellular + $50 for Tom Tom +$50 1 month cellular is a lot less than $2,100 Nav system or $900 Volvo Garmin. Some day in the future I expect I will be able to install a nav for a lot less, in the same way that car audio aftermarket has become so inexpensive.
 
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