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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I figured I'd start my own thread since I have many random issues, thoughts and questions as I work towards and mostly dream about making progress on my 142. Today my replacement dash arrived. It had been in great condition but the USPS dropped it on its corner creating multiple cracks in the aged vinyl. Because of this I've decided that I'll work towards sending it to just dashes since I'm done searching for 18 months without a decent find.. It's an impossible part to find mint and even though just dashes wants $1,500 I'm not guaranteed that I'll ever find one and that it'll arrive unscathed.

But since I now have a spare dash I started messing around with placement of the 8-track radio. There's no bracket behind the radio so I'm not sure how these mounted. Surely not only by the brass radio nuts that tighten behind each knob!? Does anyone have any input on the type of mount normally found behind an original radio?




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There is usually a steel strap / bracket that hangs down and bolts to the back of the radio so it ends up being supported by the retaining nuts on the knobs and facia mounting at the front (or the cage if it is a modern DIN chassis) and the support strap at the back. I am a little fuzzy on what the top of the strap is attached to in my car. If I get a chance, I will have a look.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Would be great if you could have a look. I did not see a strap behind this dash so I'm curious as to how I'll make this work.

There is usually a steel strap / bracket that hangs down and bolts to the back of the radio so it ends up being supported by the retaining nuts on the knobs and facia mounting at the front (or the cage if it is a modern DIN chassis) and the support strap at the back. I am a little fuzzy on what the top of the strap is attached to in my car. If I get a chance, I will have a look.
 

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I figured I'd start my own thread since I have many random issues, thoughts and questions as I work towards and mostly dream about making progress on my 142. Today my replacement dash arrived. It had been in great condition but the USPS dropped it on its corner creating multiple cracks in the aged vinyl. Because of this I've decided that I'll work towards sending it to just dashes since I'm done searching for 18 months without a decent find.. It's an impossible part to find mint and even though just dashes wants $1,500 I'm not guaranteed that I'll ever find one and that it'll arrive unscathed.






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Are you talking about a cracked dash pad? If so, and as long as the pad has not been crushed where it was dropped, a very respectable repair should not be $1500 (or the equivalent of $2000 Cdn!!!!). My dash pad had rather lengthy cracks in the upper left and right corners. The upholstery shop that did the repairs on my seats filled the cracks with something and did a fairly good grain match on the repair. I repainted the entire dash assembly and pad with an adhesion promoter and paint (I would have to check the brand) to color match the repair and the original pad. Total cost (shop work and paint supplies) was around $150. The repair is not invisible. Once you know where to look, you can see the repair area; but, unless you point out the repair to visitors, they won't notice it.

Will try and get the photo of the radio mount today.
 

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The very first 'Volvo' radio in my car was supported on the back by a strap hanging from 'something'. However, I have no clue what that was and with the current radio and the glovebox in place, it is impossible to see where the attachment point might have been.

The current radio is also supported by a strap; but, from below. The two photos are looking up from the glovebox opening. The support strap is screwed into the dash pad along the lip that the plastic facia clips to. You can see the edge of the facia and its clip in the one photo. I used a fairly large stainless sheet metal screw to screw into the pad. The strap bends up to support the bottom of the radio and is bolted to a stud on the back side of the radio. The modern radios are light and this mounting method has proven to be secure. Your old radio with the 8 track might be quite a bit heavier and this mounting method may not be as good.




 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've been comparing the dash pad I received yesterday to the one currently installed and there's a difference. The installed one is split down the middle with large sections of the vinyl missing entirely (PO attempted to screw a tach into the top). The used part seems to have a wider gap between the top and the bottom so that the center trim piece has large gaps forming the as it gets closer to the instrument cluster section. My old dash doesn't have this and this trim work is a snug fit. I feel like the pad may be warped more so than my original. I'm a perfectionist so this irritates me somewhat. You can even tell from the bottom ledge where my original is more flat whereas the used part is more slanted downward if that makes any sense.

I never thought that the radio would be supported from the bottom like that. Would it have killed Volvo to fabricate a cage for this to slide into? :confused:

Are you talking about a cracked dash pad? If so, and as long as the pad has not been crushed where it was dropped, a very respectable repair should not be $1500 (or the equivalent of $2000 Cdn!!!!). My dash pad had rather lengthy cracks in the upper left and right corners. The upholstery shop that did the repairs on my seats filled the cracks with something and did a fairly good grain match on the repair. I repainted the entire dash assembly and pad with an adhesion promoter and paint (I would have to check the brand) to color match the repair and the original pad. Total cost (shop work and paint supplies) was around $150. The repair is not invisible. Once you know where to look, you can see the repair area; but, unless you point out the repair to visitors, they won't notice it.

Will try and get the photo of the radio mount today.
 

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That is not the way Volvo mounted the original radio. The bracket was from the top. I mounted the bracket from the bottom because it was easier.
 

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Is your dash the faux wood? I thought that didn't appear until '72?
Oooh, extra points for spotting that! You are right, my '71 142 E dash also has (had) a grained black vinyl coating on it, not the faux wood mactac.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So the dash in the car right now is black but the dash in the photo was the replacement dash that's sitting on my kitchen table. I've been using this second dash to work on fitment of the radio. I'm also thinking of replacing the black vinyl with black basket weave so I'll probably use the faux wood one to test on.

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Excellent. Glad to see you sticking to the original. I see a lot of cars that just aren't what they claim to be. There's nothing wrong with modified cars, but it's good to see them called what they are. As cars become more collectible, this becomes really important. Our cars aren't really there yet, but they are getting there. They will never be Gullwings, but with so few surviving examples I'm certain we will see some real increase in value.

Speaking of originality, that $30k '72 142GT is an interesting example. I haven't checked the serial number on it, but by all indications that's a '71 not a '72. It's got the raised exterior door handles, black dash, and the '71 and earlier lower dash arrangement. The serial number would confirm it. Regardless, it's one of the best examples of a GT accessory-adorned 142.

The often-seen Red 142GT is another example. Again, a magnificent display of GT and other Volvo options, but it's not a '71, and definitely not an E. The serial number, once again, sets the baseline for the car. It's a '68 142S, originally with a B18 engine and an automatic transmission. And the door arm rests and seat upholstery are all consistent with a '68. That stuff was all different by the time '71 rolled around.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I've been on the hunt for GT items since I bought her 2 years ago. So far I've either come across parts I was unwilling to pay the fortune demanded or some parts are just too damaged to make it worth the purchase. I believe the owner of that Red GT sells GT parts but they are pricey. I believe that car has the engine configuration of an S but I could be mistaken.

Excellent. Glad to see you sticking to the original. I see a lot of cars that just aren't what they claim to be. There's nothing wrong with modified cars, but it's good to see them called what they are. As cars become more collectible, this becomes really important. Our cars aren't really there yet, but they are getting there. They will never be Gullwings, but with so few surviving examples I'm certain we will see some real increase in value.

Speaking of originality, that $30k '72 142GT is an interesting example. I haven't checked the serial number on it, but by all indications that's a '71 not a '72. It's got the raised exterior door handles, black dash, and the '71 and earlier lower dash arrangement. The serial number would confirm it. Regardless, it's one of the best examples of a GT accessory-adorned 142.

The often-seen Red 142GT is another example. Again, a magnificent display of GT and other Volvo options, but it's not a '71, and definitely not an E. The serial number, once again, sets the baseline for the car. It's a '68 142S, originally with a B18 engine and an automatic transmission. And the door arm rests and seat upholstery are all consistent with a '68. That stuff was all different by the time '71 rolled around.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
So the basket weave samples came in. I'm not sure how I'll make this work or if it can but I'm brain storming. Here are the samples.








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For the dashboard trim, you might want to consider some textured vinyl wrap as an alternative to the basket weave material. You can get faux carbon fiber, faux wood grain in various colours, faux leather grain and a bunch of brushed metal look a like finishes. It has the advantage that it is easy to apply on a flat surface and if you dislike the results, it is easy to remove.
 
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