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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Ok , I've always been of the thought if you don't know the age of the timing belt , then change it asap.

Well this time I'm not sure if I should or not so I'm going to ask the pros here what they think.

I've priced the new belt replacement and the lowest price in my area is 680.

I payed 1500 for the car. It runs great , everything has been sorted since I've purchased it.

That's the thing the car runs so well I'm debating getting all the needed maintenance up to date and getting it to a complete stage 0.

I was thinking of getting a 3 inch downpipe and a tune to have a little fun with the car. But first I have a few more things to get to.

Now I have to make a decision. So I'm asking for a little helpful eye.

The label on this timing cover sticker says 2007 @ 109000.

This belt look 12 years old and 90k miles later ?

I'd say no. Carfax has a drive belt change in 2013 @ 155000. But who knows which belt it's referring to.
Mystery aged belt.

https://imgur.com/gallery/fIPhobi


Let me know what you think. I really don't want to drop 700 on a belt that's at halflife.

I have just enough mechanical skill to not feel confident doing it myself. Tuneups and brakes and other things I'm fine with. This one is just a touch out of my area.

Thanks!

Edit- I did look at the tensioners and they do not to appear to be leaking any grease. Everything down there looks very dry.
 

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From your description, the car has 109000 + 90000 = 199000 miles. The engine will be significantly damaged if the belt fails. There will be contact between pistons and valves if this happens. If it were my car, I would change the timing belt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
From your description, the car has 109000 + 90000 = 199000 miles. The engine will be significantly damaged if the belt fails. There will be contact between pistons and valves if this happens. If it were my car, I would change the timing belt.
I think you missed the question. In my opinion (which is slightly above novice) this belt looks like it was changed within the last 5 years.

To me it doesn't look like a 12 year old belt with 90k miles on it.

But I'm not 100% sure. Don't want to spend 700 on a timing belt that's not due. I'd rather put that money into a few other things on the car.

I've been looking at a few videos and watching how the timing belt is changed. Starting to think this just might be something I can tackle myself.

I'd prefer to pay someone that is experienced with the job. But in my area (Hudson valley , NY) , I haven't found a shop that is reasonable. Most are looking to charge for 5-6 hours labor. 200+ for parts.
 

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If you don't know the last belt interval and you really do like the car - Replace it. 5-6 hours of labor is insane unless they are also replacing cam seals, water pump etc,..

700 bucks for preventative maintenance or 3000+ for replacing the engine. (i wouldnt repair one with that many miles, id find a lower mileage engine unless i could do the labor myself).

Or the alternative is to ride it out a bit until you think it's time to replace it ;). The timing belt will totally piss in your cornflakes if it breaks.
 

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Hard to say if that's a 6 year old belt or a 12 year old belt. I tend to doubt that Carmax would have changed it before it was due, which is what they would have been doing if it was done in 2013. I would err on the side of caution and change it.
 

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I think you missed the question. In my opinion (which is slightly above novice) this belt looks like it was changed within the last 5 years.

To me it doesn't look like a 12 year old belt with 90k miles on it.

From the picture, that belt looks fairly recent to me. The 'paint' on it hasn't wear much. Spin it all the way to look at each section. If it's true, hopefully they've also replaced the water pump. Maybe take another close-up picture with the tensioner pulley surface - you can see the difference between the surface where the belts runs on, the area where the belt is not touching.


You may also try to read the date stamped on the water pump, with a phone camera and a mirror, from inside the wheel arch. The tensioner also has a date stamped on it, but it's on the back side
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I think you missed the question. In my opinion (which is slightly above novice) this belt looks like it was changed within the last 5 years.

To me it doesn't look like a 12 year old belt with 90k miles on it.

From the picture, that belt looks fairly recent to me. The 'paint' on it hasn't wear much. Spin it all the way to look at each section. If it's true, hopefully they've also replaced the water pump. Maybe take another close-up picture with the tensioner pulley surface - you can see the difference between the surface where the belts runs on, the area where the belt is not touching.


You may also try to read the date stamped on the water pump, with a phone camera and a mirror, from inside the wheel arch. The tensioner also has a date stamped on it, but it's on the back side

That's a great tip. I'm going to check tomorrow for sure.

Thank you everyone , for the comments. Exactly what I was looking for.
 

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I would say this is the nicest looking 90k mile timing belt that I have seen. I have changed at least 30 of these. They are not hard to do. With this being said. I would change the h2o pump. If you don't know if the coolant has been changed every other year, then the h2o pump may not make the 105k mile journey to the next timing belt change. H2o failure can cause timing failure. If you are going to change the h2o pump you might as well change the timing belt. If you are going to do it yourself, I would recommend a high torque impact gun to remove the crank pulley nut. a lot better than using a big arse breaker bar and the Volvo crank tool to stop the crank from moving.
 
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