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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I had a chance to spend a week with a 2019 V60 T6 AWD R-Design, and I wanted to share my review with you all. Here's the link - https://youtu.be/gE0BCbQlut8


My daily is a 2017 S60 T5 AWD Dynamic, which I've had for over 2 years and I kind of want to compare it to a brand-new V60.

Powertrain

First thing I noticed is that the powertrain in the new V60 is much more refined comparing to my P3. Obviously I can't compare the T5 to T6, but I did notice that the transmission is better at shifting gears, the engine bay is better isolated, and the auto start/stop works a lot smoother. The exhaust sounds more agressive.

Drivetrain

I have a touring chassis in my S60, and I can't really compare it to the dynamic chassis that my tester had. The car obviously handles better, but on a very rough pavement the ride is more harsh. The steering seems to be quicker and more responsive, but for my taste it's overly assisted at lower speeds, even in Dynamic mode.

Interior

The interior is where the new V60 shines. It's incredible, not only in terms of the design, but also in terms materials used. There is significantly more room in the back seat and the cabin seems to be better isolated. I just wish that double-glazed side windows were available in the US.

The seats

In my opinion, the seats are still very good and you can drive the car for hours without any problems, but the ones I have in my S60 are softer and seem to be a little more comfortable. The adjustability is great, and I'm glad that now Volvo offers 4-way powered lumbar support. Extendable thigh support is also a nice thing to have. Also, seating position in the S/V60 is much lower (I prefer seating in a car as low as possible).

Infotainment

I've heard many automotive journalists complain about the infotainment unit in new Volvos, but I haven't experienced any issues with it, and I like it a lot more than the one I have in my S60. Once you get familiar with the touchscreen, you will learn that it is actually very intuitive. Even the fact that the HVAC system is controlled via the touchscreen doesn't bother me. I always have the temperature set to 70 degrees in full auto mode, all year around.

Headlights

My S60 is equipped with Bi-Xenon ABL, which work relatively well, but the LEDs in the V60 provide much better light output. I also noticed that the headlights in cars equipped with the Advanced Package have "FULL-LED ACTIVE HIGH BEAM" written on them, so my assumption is that AHB can be activated via a software update, once this technology becomes legal in the U.S.

Fun fact: looks like the S/V60 no longer has SRS/SIPS BAG decals on the windshield.

Let me know if you have any questions about the new V60, I will be more than happy to answer them!
 

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Infotainment

I've heard many automotive journalists complain about the infotainment unit in new Volvos, but I haven't experienced any issues with it, and I like it a lot more than the one I have in my S60. Once you get familiar with the touchscreen, you will learn that it is actually very intuitive. Even the fact that the HVAC system is controlled via the touchscreen doesn't bother me. I always have the temperature set to 70 degrees in full auto mode, all year around.
Nice video.

I keep hearing about the complaints with the infotainment system but honestly I don't know why they are complaining. I figure it's more to do with muscle memory of another system than it is to do with Volvo's system.

Granted, I'm only about 5 days in on the new system but I don't find it problematic at all.
 

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I had a chance to spend a week with a 2019 V60 T6 AWD R-Design, and I wanted to share my review with you all. Here's the link - https://youtu.be/gE0BCbQlut8


My daily is a 2017 S60 T5 AWD Dynamic, which I've had for over 2 years and I kind of want to compare it to a brand-new V60.

Powertrain

First thing I noticed is that the powertrain in the new V60 is much more refined comparing to my P3. Obviously I can't compare the T5 to T6, but I did notice that the transmission is better at shifting gears, the engine bay is better isolated, and the auto start/stop works a lot smoother.

Drivetrain

I have a touring chassis in my S60, and I can't really compare it to the dynamic chassis that my tester had. The car obviously handles better, but on a very rough pavement the ride is more harsh. The steering seems to be quicker and more responsive, but for my taste it's overly assisted at lower speeds, even in Dynamic mode.

Interior

The interior is where the new V60 shines. It's incredible, not only in terms of the design, but also in terms materials used. There is significantly more room in the back seat and the cabin seems to be better isolated. I just wish that double-glazed side windows were available in the US.

The seats

In my opinion, the seats are still very good and you can drive the car for hours without any problems, but the ones I have in my S60 are softer and seem to be a little more comfortable. The adjustability is great, and I'm glad that now Volvo offers 4-way powered lumbar support. Extendable thigh support is also a nice thing to have.

Infotainment

I've heard many automotive journalists complain about the infotainment unit in new Volvos, but I haven't experienced any issues with it, and I like it a lot more than the one I have in my S60. Once you get familiar with the touchscreen, you will learn that it is actually very intuitive. Even the fact that the HVAC system is controlled via the touchscreen doesn't bother me. I always have the temperature set to 70 degrees in full auto mode, all year around.

Headlights

My S60 is equipped with Bi-Xenon ABL, which work relatively well, but the LEDs in the V60 provide much provide much better light output. I also noticed that the headlights in cars equipped with the Advanced Package have "FULL-LED ACTIVE HIGH BEAM" written on them, so my assumption is that AHB can be activated via a software update, once this technology becomes legal in the U.S.

Let me know if you have any questions about the new V60, I will be more than happy to answer them!
AHB is working on my V60 in the US.

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6013 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
As of now, it turns the high beams on or off. The way it works in other countries is your high beams stay on the whole time (in a way), however, if there is a car in front of you, certain portions of the light are blocked, so that the car ahead of you is not blinded. Couple years ago I drove a V60 equipped with those and it is one of the best features in automotive lightning. This is what AHB looks like:

 

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Nice video.

I keep hearing about the complaints with the infotainment system but honestly I don't know why they are complaining. I figure it's more to do with muscle memory of another system than it is to do with Volvo's system.

Granted, I'm only about 5 days in on the new system but I don't find it problematic at all.
The problem is several-fold. One: audio and climate should be in buttons and knobs, not a touchscreen -- for two key reasons: (1) buttons and knobs can obviate the need to look much (if at all) when changing climate or audio, which is a HUGE safety issue, when a driver has to take eyes off the road for any amount of time; and (2) the system can be slow to boot up upon getting in the car, meaning you don't have immediate access to those controls, but more importantly, computer systems can and do fail much more than analog systems fail, and it's unacceptable to have your audio and climate controls fail because your computer fails. On the safety end, this is very important, and I find it extremely ironic and odd that a car manufacturer that prides itself in safety would make such a huge gaffe by taking climate and audio controls away from buttons.

And, this computer infotainment screen is going to look very dated in a handful of years (or less). It's a plus that Volvo is discarding the current Sensus infotainment system for the new Google OS system, replete with Google Maps (which are FAR superior to the current Sensus maps). Even Volvo execs have come out publicly in the last year and admitted that the Sensus system is not very good, and that it is better to go with the experts like Google for this sort of in-car computer system.
 

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First thing I noticed is that the powertrain in the new V60 is much more refined comparing to my P3. Obviously I can't compare the T5 to T6, but I did notice that the transmission is better at shifting gears, the engine bay is better isolated, and the auto start/stop works a lot smoother. The exhaust sounds more agressive.
Do you mean that the T5 transmission shifting is better than that in the T6?
 

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As of now, it turns the high beams on or off. The way it works in other countries is your high beams stay on the whole time (in a way), however, if there is a car in front of you, certain portions of the light are blocked, so that the car ahead of you is not blinded. Couple years ago I drove a V60 equipped with those and it is one of the best features in automotive lightning. This is what AHB looks like:

If I'm interpreting that photo correctly, that's an incredible innovation!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Do you mean that the T5 transmission shifting is better than that in the T6?
Generally speaking, the powertrains in cars based on SPA platforms seem to be more refined. I meant that the transmission shifting in the T6 is better - seems to smoother in comparison to my P3.
 

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If I'm interpreting that photo correctly, that's an incredible innovation!
It indeed is an incredible innovation, and it makes driving at night a lot safer - you see a lot more! Few car manufacturers (including Toyota, VW, BMW) already wrote petitions to NHTSA to legalize AHB technology, and some organizations, such as IIHS and AAA support it. Apparently, NHTSA is leaning towards making it legal, but who knows when it will happen... Our regulations regarding headlights are very outdated - I can't believe that the self-leveling and headlight washers are not required for HID and LED headlights.

Here's a video which shows how Volvo's AHB works in action:
 

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The problem is several-fold. One: audio and climate should be in buttons and knobs, not a touchscreen -- for two key reasons: (1) buttons and knobs can obviate the need to look much (if at all) when changing climate or audio, which is a HUGE safety issue, when a driver has to take eyes off the road for any amount of time; and (2) the system can be slow to boot up upon getting in the car, meaning you don't have immediate access to those controls, but more importantly, computer systems can and do fail much more than analog systems fail, and it's unacceptable to have your audio and climate controls fail because your computer fails. On the safety end, this is very important, and I find it extremely ironic and odd that a car manufacturer that prides itself in safety would make such a huge gaffe by taking climate and audio controls away from buttons.

And, this computer infotainment screen is going to look very dated in a handful of years (or less). It's a plus that Volvo is discarding the current Sensus infotainment system for the new Google OS system, replete with Google Maps (which are FAR superior to the current Sensus maps). Even Volvo execs have come out publicly in the last year and admitted that the Sensus system is not very good, and that it is better to go with the experts like Google for this sort of in-car computer system.
I find the "has to be knobs" argument pretty tiresome. Mainly because it's overlooking dozens of cars where the knobs require knowing where the knobs are--which means looking at them most of the time, if even for a second.

The second point has only half merit, mainly because these aren't critical systems failing. This is infotainment and climate control. If the system fails, it might not be ideal but you can drive the vehicle still. So your "safety" issue is nonexistent as well.

It may look dated in a few years. Or it may not look dated in a few years and every car will have them.

If they ditched Sensus, I'd rather have seen them go to QNX rather than Google. QNX is far more robust than literally anything out there and has been for decades.
 

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I always found this video to be more telling on what the concept was on Active High Beams.

 

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Agreed

The problem is several-fold. One: audio and climate should be in buttons and knobs, not a touchscreen -- for two key reasons: (1) buttons and knobs can obviate the need to look much (if at all) when changing climate or audio, which is a HUGE safety issue, when a driver has to take eyes off the road for any amount of time; and (2) the system can be slow to boot up upon getting in the car, meaning you don't have immediate access to those controls, but more importantly, computer systems can and do fail much more than analog systems fail, and it's unacceptable to have your audio and climate controls fail because your computer fails. On the safety end, this is very important, and I find it extremely ironic and odd that a car manufacturer that prides itself in safety would make such a huge gaffe by taking climate and audio controls away from buttons.]

I think the new S60's are fantastic looking. However, I'm reluctant to trade in my 2013 because of my concerns about having so many functions on that touch screen.
 

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I find the "has to be knobs" argument pretty tiresome. Mainly because it's overlooking dozens of cars where the knobs require knowing where the knobs are--which means looking at them most of the time, if even for a second.

The second point has only half merit, mainly because these aren't critical systems failing. This is infotainment and climate control. If the system fails, it might not be ideal but you can drive the vehicle still. So your "safety" issue is nonexistent as well.
What you wrote here is laughable, and outright wrong. I generally can do my climate-control and audio-control knobs on my 2001 Volvo without looking. When you own a car for even a short time with knobs, you know where they are from muscle memory. With a touchscreen, this is not possible, and indeed it can take quite a lot of time away from the road for a driver to be fiddling with the touchscreen, to move do different screens to get what you want, and even to change volume and temperature.

Yes, if you rent a car that you are not familiar with, it may be more distracting at first to use any knobs/buttons.
 

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What you wrote here is laughable, and outright wrong. I generally can do my climate-control and audio-control knobs on my 2001 Volvo without looking. When you own a car for even a short time with knobs, you know where they are from muscle memory. With a touchscreen, this is not possible, and indeed it can take quite a lot of time away from the road for a driver to be fiddling with the touchscreen, to move do different screens to get what you want, and even to change volume and temperature.

Yes, if you rent a car that you are not familiar with, it may be more distracting at first to use any knobs/buttons.
I think your experience with cars is affecting your logic.

I have a Ford Fusion whereby you are almost guaranteed to have to look for a second to see what knob to press. There are literally 3 dozen buttons on the interface. I've owned that car for a decade.

So laughable? Wrong?

Your subjective use of auto interfaces is limited by your familiarity of your own vehicle.

That's not my problem. It also limits your ability to learn new things and associate how things work.

Note: I'll take your silence on the other parts of my critique as you agreeing that it was spot-on.

I can't help it that in 2001 Volvo made a great knob interface that you enjoy and today they don't apparently. That doesn't make my view about touchscreens invalid.
 

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The problem is several-fold. One: audio and climate should be in buttons and knobs, not a touchscreen -- for two key reasons: (1) buttons and knobs can obviate the need to look much (if at all) when changing climate or audio, which is a HUGE safety issue, when a driver has to take eyes off the road for any amount of time; and (2) the system can be slow to boot up upon getting in the car, meaning you don't have immediate access to those controls, but more importantly, computer systems can and do fail much more than analog systems fail, and it's unacceptable to have your audio and climate controls fail because your computer fails. On the safety end, this is very important, and I find it extremely ironic and odd that a car manufacturer that prides itself in safety would make such a huge gaffe by taking climate and audio controls away from buttons.]

I think the new S60's are fantastic looking. However, I'm reluctant to trade in my 2013 because of my concerns about having so many functions on that touch screen.
I agree. This system gets bashed by pretty much every professional auto reviewer who drives the car but then I guess they bash every infotainment/climate control system. :rolleyes:
 

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I agree. This system gets bashed by pretty much every professional auto reviewer who drives the car but then I guess they bash every infotainment/climate control system. :rolleyes:
yep... There are lots of good articles and videos by knowledgeable people articulating why touchscreen systems in cars are bad for things like climate and audio.
Here's one of them: https://uxdesign.cc/why-touchscreens-dont-work-in-cars-69b6ff3d4355 ... This article also notes (as do many other reviews) how voice commands in cars is still not very good and is not a good replacement for buttons and dials.
I by-passed getting a new Volvo again this year, in favor of a 2019 Macan, which has a much-better infotainment screen but which also has all climate and seat-adjustment (including heating) controls in a plethora of buttons on the center console; it looks better to me, and is way more practical and safe.
I am likely to get a new Volvo in a year or two again, after the new Google OS comes into the computer screen on all Volvos. I really like the looks of the new V60 Cross Country.
But I have a prediction that cars will go back toward buttons and dials for climate, audio, seats, etc., after this period of experimenting with computer touchscreens for everything.
 

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How often are you guys changing your climate controls while driving? I've had my VR's climate settings set and untouched for the last 4 years of ownership. I definitely could not accurately adjust the settings without looking at the knob to grab it correctly and then again to see that I've made the right adjustment. Likewise, what audio changes are you making that aren't with the steering wheel controls?

I find the boot speed of these systems (and even aftermarket NAV headunits) to be the most offensive part. Waiting around for the system to pick up before you can do anything is really annoying and has the negative side effect of making you more likely to fiddle with the system while driving since you couldn't use it while starting the car and before moving.
 

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I'm totally new to this touchscreen thing. And I just came from a 2001 Lexus, buttons and knobs for everything. I just don't feel like its that big of a change to warrant the hysteria over a touchscreen being evil. We have a Mazda CX-5 too which is sort of in between, mostly buttons with a knob controller. It allows touchscreen only when you are stationary. All of those cars I have had to look to change the climate control, I can twist a knob or push a button without looking, but what temp did I set it at? Oh I have to look. Way down on the dash in the old Lexus. I drove it for 7 years and still hard to find the heated seat switch by feel, quicker to look. Radio beyond volume, gotta look. The Mazda knob actually seems worse to me, I can't just touch what I want to go to, I need to twist the knob while I look and coordinate with my eyes which item I am highlighting to click on.

The linked UXCollective article is interesting, brings up some concerns, but I can't buy their "research" as there did not seem to be any control. They were just observing some people using a complex system. Buttons or screens all cars now have so many more functions to manage than they ever did. I'd like to see some real scientific research results but I haven't sought it out.

I don't really find the urge to "check the screen" very often myself. I'm hardly perfect, ok very flawed haha but one thing I just happen to have is good situational awareness. Years of doing track days and auto-x I just tend to sit close to the wheel, both hands on, know whats ahead, what's behind, do the mirror circles every once in a while. I find having one interface, one single screen with all the info and functions I need, no buttons strewn all about the cabin, it just seems to work for me. And I was really concerned about that in buying this car.
 

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How often are you guys changing your climate controls while driving? I've had my VR's climate settings set and untouched for the last 4 years of ownership. I definitely could not accurately adjust the settings without looking at the knob to grab it correctly and then again to see that I've made the right adjustment. Likewise, what audio changes are you making that aren't with the steering wheel controls?

I find the boot speed of these systems (and even aftermarket NAV headunits) to be the most offensive part. Waiting around for the system to pick up before you can do anything is really annoying and has the negative side effect of making you more likely to fiddle with the system while driving since you couldn't use it while starting the car and before moving.
I change my climate controls constantly. When the sun is shining hotly, I want cold air coming out fast, so I ramp up the fan and lower the temp. When it's cold, I also ramp up the fan and the heat to very high to get the car warmed quickly. I find that on drives -- whether short ones or long ones, there's constantly a change in sunlight, cloud cover, and other factors. And then there's seat heating ... that gets changed a lot too on a single drive; turn it on high in cold of winter to get the seats warm fast, then turn down the temp (or turn it off totally). Ditto for steering-wheel heating.

And I'm often on the phone or talking to a passenger, so voice controls are totally inappropriate much of the time, as a replacement for knobs/dials -- even if voice controls worked well (which they don't).
 

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I'm totally new to this touchscreen thing. And I just came from a 2001 Lexus, buttons and knobs for everything. I just don't feel like its that big of a change to warrant the hysteria over a touchscreen being evil..
Welcome to the Swedspeed Volvo board, hysteria is very common here. I don’t know what it is but people are very, imo over the top critical here, more-so than on other boards I’ve visited. When I had my BMW I visited Bimmer boards and there were just as many things to complain about with BMW’s but complaining about everything wasn’t a thing......people were allowed to enjoy their cars......oh well. I still have gained a lot from bing a part of this community. very helpful overall.


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