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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do I remove the steer shaft cover? It slides back but hangs up on something inside. Is there a clip in there I'm not seeing?

I'm thinking there might be some value in keeping the front brake calipers and rebuilding them. What do you think? How rare are ones with the logo?


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Steering shaft cover - I assume that you are talking about the external steel column? If so, what year is your car? If it is a later model it should have a steering column lock. If it has a column lock; based upon my experience with the 140, there will be a steel collar with a slot on it on the steering shaft that the lock mechanism engages. The collar is fixed to the shaft with mungo rivets so its difficult to remove. The collar will hit the bearing at the bottom end of the steering column which is why you can't extract it from the bottom end of the column with the bearing in place. The bearings are a separate piece; but, just about impossible to remove without damaging them and if they are the same piece as on the 140, they are out of production so best not to damage them by attempting removal. I recommend against drilling out the retaining rivets on the collar because it will be difficult to reinstall them if you want to retain the lock function.

That is my experience based upon the 140 (which doesn't always apply to the 1800 / 122) and assumes that you have a locking column. If you don't have a column lock, then ??????

That logo is the Girling logo. Every Girling 4 piston front caliper for vintage Volvos that I have seen has the logo. Rebuilds used to be easily available from Rock Auto and other sources; but, seem to be getting harder to find. If the pistons are not rusted, I would be inclined to rebuild them. Rebuild kits are inexpensive and its a lot cheaper to ship a rebuild kit that a caliper!. I did mine on my 140 and it was not difficult. If you rebuild, do not separate the caliper halves by removing the clamping bolts. The service manual warns against that. If the pistons are sticky, block the unused connections and connect a good grease gun to one of the ports and pump! A good quality grease gun can generate more pressure that an air compressor (limited to about 140 psi) and when the piston lets go the release is not explosive like it can be with compressed air. The down side is cleaning up the grease.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The external column, yes. It's a '73 and does have the column lock. But the sticking point is at the other end of the tube when I extend the external column over the shaft. It's catching on something.

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bkap;

It often very helpful to understand the subtleties of assembly of, for instance the Steering Column, by looking at the exploded assembly diagram on the GCP.se site...

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ron,

I've looked at the drawings in the parts book but don't see any type of retaining clip. I'll look again.

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yep. I saw those and elsewhere, as well. I'm new to old Volvos and didn't know if the ones I have are unique or not. Seems to be "or not." They don't look to be in bad shape, other than some surface rust so I might just rebuild them. The master, however, will be replaced.

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The external column, yes. It's a '73 and does have the column lock. But the sticking point is at the other end of the tube when I extend the external column over the shaft. It's catching on something.

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At the other end - I assume means the bottom end of the tube? If so, how far can you pull the shaft out the bottom end of the tube? If you can withdraw the shaft most of the distance out the bottom end of the tube leaving you with perhaps 10" or so of the shaft still in the tube before it hits something, then that is the locking collar on the shaft hitting the inner race of the bottom column bearing. If you can only move the shaft a short distance before the shaft catches on something, then something completely different is happening.

The parts diagram for the later 1800 shows that it uses exactly the same top and bottom bearing, spring and seat arrangement as the 140 (parts # 85611, 85612, and 85613). As such, I expect that unless you are prepared to try removing the lower bearing, the column is not coming out of the tube. I am not sure that it is even possible to remove the bearing with the shaft in the tube without destroying the bearing. Do that and you are screwed because replacement bearings are not available. I suspect Volvo pressed the bearing in after the shaft was installed.

PS The locking collar on the steering shaft is not shown in the parts diagram, probably because it is not a separate part - considered as part of the steering shaft.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Neil,

The tube stops a few inches before coming completely off. You may be correct about the lower bearing in the tube or on the shaft. Maybe I should focus on separating the shaft from the lower shaft at the connecting disk, which is in need of replacement anyway.
 

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I have always wondered why they do not recommend taking the brake caliper halves apart. I wonder if it is to stop people from doing it when they are simply "servicing" the brakes ON the car. Certainly if you separated the halves while still on the car it would be near impossible to re assemble without getting some dirt on the mounting surfaces

But surely once the calipers are off the car and on the work bench, and throughly disassembled, de rusted, cleaned, then a spotless clean rebuild is well within the scope of the average shade tree mechanic.

Does anybody have a reasonable explanation as to why they recommend not talking the halves apart? it seems perfectly sound to do so in a clean environment to service the internal o-ring, and de rust and paint the surfaces around the piston cylinders

The small o-ring and new bolts are available on most Vintage British Sports car websites as well as V.P and the usual Vintage Volvo sources. for example from VP

o-ring http://212.247.61.152/us/main.aspx?page=article&artno=S7428
Bolt http://212.247.61.152/us/main.aspx?page=article&artno=955539

Part numbers match up to the parts list as shown below

You could also get grade 8 bolts from an alternate source and torque to grade 8 spec.

Here is a pic of one of a pair that I recently rebuilt. but to be honest ... I haven't had the time to re install them on one of my cars yet so cannot vouch that my dis-obayment or the GreenBook has doomed them to the scrap heap .

I may also try adding some yellow paint to the embossed logo, as per the Girling website logo.

Also below couple of pics from the parts catalog (1800S/E/ES)

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http://www.girlingauto.com/
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Cobalt blue Blue Footwear Electric blue Shoe

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White Line Monochrome Black-and-white

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White Line
 

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If you separate the caliper halves, you release a demon and shall be relegated to Helheim!

Actually, my 140 green book says "The brake caliper halves should not be separated. The reason for this is that subsequent assembling would require test pressure equipment and special fluids for the bolts." Suitably cryptic about the special fluids. As a contract lawyer I worked with noted to me during drafting an agreement, 'shall not' is an absolute; but, 'should not' provides wiggle room. Perhaps scaramoucheii dodged the trip to Helheim on a technicality.

Spiffy blue on the calipers. Matches your 140 suspension components or are the calipers off of your 1800?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I would think the "special fluids on the bolts" would be some flavor of thread lock. But which?

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I would think the "special fluids on the bolts" would be some flavor of thread lock. But which?

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I don't know; but, providing your pistons still move you can remove everything without pulling the calipers apart so no need to pull the halves apart to replace pistons, seals and boots.
 

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If you separates the caliper halves, you release a demon and shall be relegated to Helheim!

Actually, my 140 green book says "The brake caliper halves should not be separated. The reason for this is that subsequent assembling would require test pressure equipment and special fluids for the bolts."
I always pressure test my brakes after I service them, the old fashioned way, by driving at 35MPH and then stepping hard on the pedal. (Just like the guy on Fantom Works does to every car they work on ... in every episode, I just try to avoid locking 'em up to save my tires)

Do that a couple of times and then crawl under and check for leaks. Then on last Sunday of the month after I get home from Cars and Coffee ...

I would think the "special fluids on the bolts" would be some flavor of thread lock. But which?

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Well if your never gonna take them apart AGAIN you can use RED, or Epoxy, but even RED (or Epoxy) comes apart with a little heat. The Bolts holding the Calipers onto the Hubs typically use BLUE



Spiffy blue on the calipers. Matches your 140 suspension components or are the calipers off of your 1800?
Well I had the can of blue left over from painting other stuff, so I thought that they would look good on the 140, but then I found some rebuilt calipers on "PartsGeek" that were too cheap to pass on, so I bought those and 1 went on the 140 and one went on the ES, and the one's I rebuilt and painted Blue are on the shelf, waiting ..... for the "Other" side caliper to start sticking ....

NOTE: I don't think that the ones I got from Parts Geek have the Girling LOGO, but I'll I'll have to check, and check what the Box that they says on it as those boxes are now on the shelf with the BLUE calipers in them. Here is a pic.

I did paint these ones Silver to match the others that were already on the 142 and 1800ES

Auto part Brake Metal
 

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I'm thinking there might be some value in keeping the front brake calipers and rebuilding them. What do you think? How rare are ones with the logo?


Here is a pic of the boxes for the calipers I purchased, I think I paid about 27$ and 15$ core, I haven't seen them that cheap since. Or even in stock for that matter.

They do seem to be Chinese knockoffs, and the second photo shows installed on the 142, viewed through the Virgo. NO LOGO, Which seems to confirm the fact that they are knockoffs and not the original article, but they stop the car so .... meh, I'll get the Originals with the Girling Logo back on eventually, blue paint and all.




Brake Caliper - Rear Right - A1 Cardone 19-324

Brake Caliper - Front Left - A1 Cardone 19-322

Brake Caliper - Front Right - A1 Cardone 19-321

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***
Auto part Wheel
 

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I just Checked my "Parts Geek" order

It was $28.05 Plus $13.00 for the core charge. (Plus Shipping, which worked out at $8 per caliper) Needles to say I kept the old calipers as shipping them back was not worth the hassle or the obvious .... selling back original GIRLING calipers for net 5 bucks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for the parts numbers. I'll take a look at the front conditions later today and if things look okay, I'll probably do a rebuild. For the backs, too. Those should be relatively easy to do.

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Do check the rears. They seem to be more prone to seizing up because of moisture in the brake fluid. Both of my rears were seized up solid and no amount of compressed air or compressed grease would pop the pistons loose. I ended up having to get rebuilds and genuine Girling rebuilds were in short supply 6+ years ago and seem to be in even shorter supply now.

If you do a complete rebuild, consider springing for DOT 5 fluid (not 5.1). It is no good for racing; but, the silicon fluid is hydrophobic so it does not accumulate water making it an ideal candidate for infrequently driven garage queens. 6+ years and my fluid remains nice an clear. Also, if you spill it, it will not damage paint which is a plus if you are chasing the inevitable brake system leaks after a complete rebuild.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
There are advantages to the DOT-5. We tried it years ago in our circle track stock cars but eventually went away from it due to the difficulty in getting a decent pedal feel with it. I'll probably stick with DOT-4 unless this old dog relearns an old trick.

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