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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all. I've been lurking here for a while and finally decided to start a post for my progress. I have a blog on tumblr documenting the progress - http://mathrock122.tumblr.com

I found the car on Craigslist for a reasonable price, considering that it has a fair amount of rust on the body. So far I've been learning a lot and having a lot of fun. Hopefully it'll all pay off once I get the car driveable.
 

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Hi all. I've been lurking here for a while and finally decided to start a post for my progress. I have a blog on tumblr documenting the progress - http://mathrock122.tumblr.com

I found the car on Craigslist for a reasonable price, considering that it has a fair amount of rust on the body. So far I've been learning a lot and having a lot of fun. Hopefully it'll all pay off once I get the car driveable.
Thanks for sharing, Nathanael.

Keep us posted on progress and any roadblocks.

Thanks.

George Dill

http://mathrock122.tumblr.com/tagged/welcome

http://forums.swedespeed.com/showthread.php?164901-How-to-remove-front-rotors-Replacement

http://forums.swedespeed.com/showthread.php?165494-Sway-bar-endlink-removal-finally!

http://forums.swedespeed.com/showthread.php?167217-Differential-Identification
 

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Hey while you have the lower control arms stripped and ready for paint, you might want to have the sway bar mounts reinforced. I don't know if you'll upgrade to a fat sway bar or not, but if there's any possibility that you will then that tab is a known weak point. Here's what I did on mine:



If you can weld, it's cake. If not, it shouldn't cost a fortune to have a welder do this for you.
 

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Before you weld on the suspension parts, it may be wise to first find out what type of steel you are dealing with. If this is low carbon steel, you can weld all you want. If this is some sort of alloy steel, you could mess up its heat treatment. That could make it brittle prone to cracking, especially in the areas close to the weld. You can still do these welds, but you will have to send the part to your local heat-treat, anneal, and repeat heat treatment to bring the hardness same to original.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hey while you have the lower control arms stripped and ready for paint, you might want to have the sway bar mounts reinforced. I don't know if you'll upgrade to a fat sway bar or not, but if there's any possibility that you will then that tab is a known weak point. Here's what I did on mine:



If you can weld, it's cake. If not, it shouldn't cost a fortune to have a welder do this for you.
It just so happens that I recently completed a welding class at the local community college, specifically because I knew I'd need to know how to weld if I ever wanted to complete this car at a reasonable cost. We learned oxy-fuel welding, stick welding, and mig welding. Seems like this might be a good (and not too risky) first attempt of my welding skills on something other than scrap metal.

Thanks for the advice.
 

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It is a low carbon car body steel made by Swedish Steel AB (SSAB). Volvo didn't do anything fancy materials wise back then. It'll take welding fine.
I am pretty sure that the body is low carbon steel, because it had to be welded.

But the suspension could be an alloy steel. There is nothing fancy about alloy steel. This was more than mature technology in the 50's or 60's. Given some stories about cracking on these parts, it is worth confirming (ductile materials like low carbon steel rarely crack). The only way to find out for sure is take a tiny piece off it from an area outside the load bearing section, and take it to your local foundry. They do a spectral analysis and tell you how much carbon it has in there, and what type of steel it is. If the low carbon is confirmed, then weld all you want. If not, then you can still weld, but you have to re harden to the correct Rc, otherwise you can make it super brittle close to the weld.

I would not be surprised if many or some of the cracks reported are due to improper welding.
 

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George, I'm due to overhaul my ignition system and this thread has steered me toward the Crane. What's the correct Crane XR700 kit for the 009 cast iron mechanical advance distributor in a B18D?
From: http://mathrock122.tumblr.com/post/13072291225/rebuilding-the-distributor

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20th November 2011
Rebuilding the distributor
When I purchased the car it had been sitting for about four years. Due to it’s age (45 years) and since it had been sitting, the distributor was in pretty poor shape. The contact breaker plate — and pretty much everything else — was quite rusty. I took everything apart and rebuilt it to the best of my abilities, putting in new points and a new condenser. The mechanical advance springs were still pretty rusty and may no longer be very effective. I’ll have to wait and see when the car is all back together, how well the advance works.
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George Dill

http://www.vclassics.com/archive/cranprn.htm

http://www.cranecams.com/uploads/instructions/9000-0700_.pdf

http://www.amazon.com/Crane-Cams-70...ersion/dp/B000CIRZLM/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top
 
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