SwedeSpeed - Volvo Performance Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
2005 Volvo S40 2.4i
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone,

My friend just put his S40 T5 AWD on Eibach lowering springs and it looks good. I've been considering lowering mine for a while, but it's a pretty decent expense for a recent college grad so I haven't taken any steps yet. I'm actually okay with the stock ride height in the front, it's just the rear that sits too high (classic Volvo rake). I have a 2005 S40 2.4i, which is front wheel drive (so it sits a bit lower in general than the AWD models). Do you think it would be worth it to just take it to a place like Meineke and get it leveled, so that I just lower the rear a bit to match the front instead of lowering the whole car? I know they supposedly offer that service, although I'm not sure at what price. And would there be any things to watch out for with a leveling job, such as uneven tire wear, alignment mess-up, or concern for stock suspension parts? Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
How do they do the leveling thing? Cut the springs or install lower springs?

If you go the lowering whole car way, then consider buying rear upper arms so u can adjust camber. Thats a must do if you consider lowering.
Also ball joints/shocks and everything else will end their life sooner. If your budget is very tight, i wouldnt recommend lowering.
My 0.02 cents


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,677 Posts
I don't know that there actually is a way to level a car out without coilovers.

Every car is a little different, so lowering springs may not have the same effect on each car. The right set of adjustable coilovers will let you adjust each corner's height.

In terms of additional wear from lowering...your shocks and struts can wear out sooner, if they aren't designed to be operating at the lowered height. I don't think camber will be thrown off by lowering the rear on a FWD Volvo(could be wrong). I think there are adjustable arms you can get for that anyways.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
As others have said, matching height exactly may be difficult, due to potential wear across the board. Mine seems roughly level front to back on all stock components.

Re: lowering -
I've had the front lowered about 1 inch on a Mazda quickstrut assembly before, and I got a lot of axle shake and bump steer. Plenty of others have lowered the front without the axle issues, but bump steer will be unavoidable without a bump steer kit for the tie rod ends (Mazda 3 one might be compatible). You'll also get more front negative camber, which isn't addressable without front camber plates (also potentially Mazda 3 compatibility). Tire wear and handling concerns here.

Rear wise, you could just get shorter springs, but your camber absolutely will go more negative, and you'll see the associated tire wear. Even stock often sees excessive rear camber over time. Adjustable arms exist, are a tiny bit tricky to install, and a pain to adjust (check camber with wheel on, take wheel off to adjust) - or calculate the "delta" (i.e you want to lose .5 degrees of camber, measure it on the hub and dial out .5 degrees). A faff either way, but with the arms properly set up, you should see no other ill effects except for quicker wear on stock shocks back there.

Broadly, I'd probably advise against dropping the front, unless you've got a great reason to do it, and willingness to buy all the parts to do it right, plus alignment afterwards. If you don't address either, bump steer is pretty noticeable and annoying, and tire wear will increase significantly. You also run the risk of axle shake, but that's a tossup. The rear, if you get the adjustable upper arms and set it all up, is a safer bet.

In the realm of handling and not aesthetics, I will say that there was less "lean" in turns with the lower front, in the "pros" column. A fatter rear sway bar will have a similar effect, and has far fewer downsides, but obviously has none of the looks factor.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
3,899 Posts
Do you think it would be worth it to just take it to a place like Meineke and get it leveled, so that I just lower the rear a bit to match the front instead of lowering the whole car?
Do NOT take it to a place like meineke, unless you the tech personally. Go to a specialized Volvo independent, TRUST ME you WILL pay for it in the long run with cheap shops.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Fill the boot with bricks of concrete!! that will flatten out the rear.

But in all honesty, the best safest way to do this would be some coilovers to adjust this yourself. This would be the more expensive route over lowering coils but I dont know if its the same in the US as the UK, there seem to be lts of second hand coilovers going for an absolute steal! Coilovers will massivly change the ride and handling, brilliant upgrade.
 
  • Like
Reactions: hq_
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top