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I have decided I wanted to lower my 2001 Volvo S80 T6. I'm new to Volvo so if anyone has lowered their's I would love for you to tell me what's the best way to lower my car and what brand.
 

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I have h&r springs and bilstein shocks.
The front is not that hard to with a set of spring compressors. If your not mechanically inclined (you need a floor jack, muscle, and experience) the rear is something you shouldn't do.
I would also recommend that when you replace the front struts you replace everything that go along with them. (xc90 spring seats, bearings) I helped my brother lower his car and he had 1 spring cup broken and he ordered 1 spring cup........... needless to say we had go back in their and replace the other cup 2 weeks later.......
YOU DO NOT WANT TO DO THE MORE THAN ONCE
 

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Rear is easy to do if you have cargo straps. Took me a while to figure it out, but once I did took very little time. Here is an album of my process.

 

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I'm with @slashmax, use the heaviest duty sprint seat you can; seems to be the xc90, you don't want to go back in there unnecessarily.

FWIW, I'm switching to KONI FSD's shocks ATM. Billsteins have been the most popular, to date, but you will have a rough ride regardless, once you are deviating from the stock suspension.
 

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hr spring and fsd is a good combo
 

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Bilstein is monotube, it's the most durable/reliable option you can go with, and they come with a lifetime warranty. Even after wear and tear after they get old they'll revalve them for very little money and send them back to you good as new. They're simple as hell to install and require no cutting like the FSDs. IMHO they're not harsh at all, so not sure what you guys are talking about. Is it firmer? Yes, but it's not crashy at all, and it offers a lot more body control and precision, the nose dive under braking is reduced greatly, corner to corner transition is a lot smoother, the car deals with undulations in the road with MUCH more poise. It really makes the car feel a lot newer and tightens it up. It doesn't get that strange compression issue that the stock struts get when you go through a dip or a bumpy corner and the car bottoms out. It's still crazy soft compared to most performance cars. Hell even compared to the CLK500 we have it feels soft and comfy, but I think the "boatiness" is just an inherent feature of the S80. xD Performance wise the best choice. Just make sure if you do get them with H&R springs, make sure you get the B8s, aka the ones intended for lowering springs. Bilstein and Ohlins are the only dampener/coilover companies I trust TBH, I personally don't even trust KW for long term use. I've heard FAR too many horror stories about their twin tube design and build quality falling apart after ~30k miles. Koni I'm okay with, it's just if you're going to spend the time and money to replace the struts, it's worth the few bucks extra to get something that's simply better and monotube. Also if you're going down that route replace the strut mounts with the more durable Bilstein Febi ones. Another option for spring seats since people mentioned the XC90 one is the IPD Heavy Duty. It's back and forth which is better, they both seam to be good, and certainly better than stock, and really a worth while thing to do while everything is apart.
 

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Rear is easy to do if you have cargo straps. Took me a while to figure it out, but once I did took very little time. Here is an album of my process.

The way i did my rear springs.
1.put the car on stands
2. remove shocks
3. use a jack to raise up on the lower arm compressing the spring
4. place a single spring compressor on the spring(you can only fit 1), as many coils as you can.
5.unbolt arms
6 lower the jack
7. take spring out
then reverse
And when you go to bolt the arms back up use a really long pry bar and a buddy, an your going to have to pull the lower arm forward to get it to line up with the hub. A strap or a long clamp going from the roadside lift points(where you would lift it to put on a spare) to the lower arm works.
 

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Compressor wouldn't work for me for rear spring removal. I tried, just couldn't get it compressed enough. There was so much tension I couldn't get the spring out all the way. Cargo strap pulled the control arm down with ease, took almost no time with almost no effort. Could easily do the whole rear with cargo straps in like no time now. Then yeah as you said compressed it back up with the jack to put everything back together.
 

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@RKH404, I've run the yellow Bilsteins for nearly the lifetime of the car (~10 years along with H&R lower springs) with nearly excellent results. The only drawback has been an extraordinary replacement rate of upper strut mount - about 4 to 5 total, and a fairly stiffer ride than I care to experience day to day at this stage in my life. I bought the FSD ignorant of the value body replacement process. The pcture on the box seem to indicate this wasn't necessary in the latest version of the product (3 years ago), So they've sat uninstalled since then. I not have the pieces, and the time to do it myself. The FSD are highly regarded, as are the Bilsteins. If I'm ultimately unhappy with the FSDs's off they come; the Bilsteins will remain unmolested. Unfortunately, I swapped both the Bilsteins and the H&R's at the same time - so I cannot conclusively blame the struts for the extremely altered ride. But once the Koni's are in, I'll have a better idea what is contributing to my cars ride. As it is, the suspensions responsiveness is unlike any other car I've driven. I would very much like to preserve that aspect of the drive, but give my lumbar a break. I've heard all kinds of rhetoric and research, but ultimately it comes down the YOUR car and if you LIKE it. :)
 

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BTW, who was it that added that washers to the top of the strut rod to offset the effects of lowering? The claim is/was that the strut was built to be installed at a specific ride height. But, I can't find the post, or recreate the research to substantiate the reasoning. Also, I could find very little resistance to struct moveement until I reached the limits of the rod movement.

Thanks in advance!!
 

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@SkyWriter Where do you live? Maybe road quality difference is what is separating our opinions? I mean California doesn't have the best roads either, but I certainly wouldn't call the ride stiff at all. But what's your frame of reference of what stiff is? Stiff compared to what? An old Cadillac, sure, but that's also why it can go around a corner. :p I mean yes compared to the stock setup it's stiffer, but the stock setup is abysmal. It's no stiffer than any modern European car. I recently got a Fiesta ST, so the S80 feels even more like a boat to me now. :p

Also for strut mounts, what are you using? The Febi Bilstein Strut Mounts?
 

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@RKH404, oh LOL New England! :) I have to drive around the pot hots, and major surface defects.
 

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Well, that would make sense. :p
 

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My 'stiffness' remarks are mostly with respect to the original stock ride. Which while was extremely smooth, was terribly unresponsive. The car wobbled a lot with quick turns. All the suspension changes have made the car extremely responsive, especially for it's weight, but - which a bad back like mine - it's can be a bit wearing at times. I tend to avoid all bumps I can. Compared to my wife Toyota RAV4 with I think has a pretty crappy feel to it. It's both worse than mine, and she doesn't drive around holes and bumps. It's an ordeal to be a passenger in that car. Her previous Toyota Sienna was that same. But, in no way does the modified S80 suspension crash or anything. It's just stiffer than it originally was, but is way more responsive, and in control. If I could have the later, with a little smoother ride, I would love than. Olin's had an adjustable ride. but I have more struct than I can use at the moment :-( maybe next time Olins....
 

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BTW, who was it that added that washers to the top of the strut rod to offset the effects of lowering? The claim is/was that the strut was built to be installed at a specific ride height. But, I can't find the post, or recreate the research to substantiate the reasoning. Also, I could find very little resistance to struct moveement until I reached the limits of the rod movement.

Thanks in advance!!
I put washers between the spring seat and the top plate because the spring seats purposefully don't engage the shock until the wheel has moved a certain distance. It helps soften ride, but makes it feel floaty with higher spring rates.

As for the ride height bit, buy the Bilstein sport struts/shocks. The rods are shortened for vehicles running lowering springs.

@RKH404, oh LOL New England! :) I have to drive around the pot hots, and major surface defects.
If you can drive around them, your roads aren't that bad.
 
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