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Hello all, this is my first post but I have been reading this forum for over a year. I own a 2008 T6, I should post of photos of it soon! Anyway, on to the problem.

For a little bit now I have been getting a low coolant light but as soon as I get maybe 200ft from my house the light goes out. As I said the reservoir has always been full when I have checked and never had any over heating issues or smells. I always just chalked it up to a bad sensor. Well today added a little twist.

My windshield washer fluid has been leaking and I've known it to be the plastic pipping that runs right behind the front fascia. So today while changing my oil I figured I would fix it. So as I was putting the plastic panel back on(front panel from underneath) there is a clip hole that is in a metal plate that is right below the radiator. As I was putting in a clip a got a little liquid coming from the hole by the end I had maybe a cup full of coolant. I assumed I had a leak somewhere in the system and it just collected there and I disturbed the foam that was there just enough for it be released.

After I was done with everything I drove it about a mile and during that mile the low coolant light would come on and off but this whole time the reservoir remains full.

Could my coolant from my reservoir be not getting to the radiator that is why its full?(But then why am I not over heating?)

Could I also have a faulty filter and a small leak?

Any thoughts on this?
 

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Are you sure it was coolant dripping from underneath the radiator? I could imagine you'd have a leak but in that case you should either drain the reservoir or perhaps get a pocket of air somewhere in the system. It's obviously not the former and if it's the latter it feels like you would've see overheating since it would prevent flow to the radiator.

I guess that you could try to start the car (engine cold) with the reservoir cap off to attempt to bleed the system. Though I've never done that and I don't know for how long you'd dare running with the lid off. As long as the level's, presumably, decreasing I suppose? Either way I think it might be a good idea to replace the sensor just in case.

Edit again: If there actually is a leak I'd imagine there's a risk the system might drain a lot quicker if you remove the filler cap. So maybe a good first start would be to remove the expansion tank's lid with the engine cold and not running. See if the level sinks or if there's a noticeable leak underneath. If so, you've got a leak. If not, try a bleed. Replace sensor either way.
 

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I agree, replace the sensor.
 

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I guess that you could try to start the car (engine cold) with the reservoir cap off to attempt to bleed the system. Though I've never done that and I don't know for how long you'd dare running with the lid off.
This is normal for bleeding the air from a system during a coolant change.
Just start with the engine cold and watch the level and shut the car down before the reservoir overflows as it heats up.
 

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My windshield washer fluid has been leaking and I've known it to be the plastic pipping that runs right behind the front fascia. So today while changing my oil I figured I would fix it. So as I was putting the plastic panel back on(front panel from underneath) there is a clip hole that is in a metal plate that is right below the radiator.
Side topic question - is there some way you can access the headlight washer fluid hoses that run under the bumper cover without actually removing the bumper cover??

I have an issue where one of the hoses connects to the passenger headlamp sprayer - I've rigged up a fix but sometimes it jiggles loose - I'd love to access this stuff without taking the whole bumper off because that is a pain...
 

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This is normal for bleeding the air from a system during a coolant change.
Just start with the engine cold and watch the level and shut the car down before the reservoir overflows as it heats up.
So it's safe to say you can bleed an engine (or the V8 at least) by running it and monitoring the level, keeping it above low and below max? I say some engines because I've heard the new VEA engines can be trickier to bleed than that. I mean, I'm just unsure at what point you're risking overheating.
 

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Side topic question - is there some way you can access the headlight washer fluid hoses that run under the bumper cover without actually removing the bumper cover??

I have an issue where one of the hoses connects to the passenger headlamp sprayer - I've rigged up a fix but sometimes it jiggles loose - I'd love to access this stuff without taking the whole bumper off because that is a pain...
I had the same issue except on the driver's side. In that case I was able to access the hose connection by taking out the fog lamp surround panel. The issue I had was that the clip that holds the hose on had been installed upside down so the hose would pop off every time the sprayers were used. Make sure the angled sides of the clip face the sprayer fitting.
 

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So it's safe to say you can bleed an engine (or the V8 at least) by running it and monitoring the level, keeping it above low and below max? I say some engines because I've heard the new VEA engines can be trickier to bleed than that. I mean, I'm just unsure at what point you're risking overheating.
Yeah, just keep the level in that range and you can't hurt anything.

1. Engine off, drain as much as you can
2. Engine still off, fill as much fresh coolant mix (50/50) as you can in the reservoir.
3. Reservoir cap off, start engine, start draining, keep topping off the reservoir as the level drops. Helps to have two people. Once the stuff you're draining looks "fresh" then stop draining.
4. Keep engine running, reservoir cap off, this is how it will "burp" out the air bubbles in the system. If the level gets too high, shut the car off and let it cool, then repeat once. This should be enough to get the air bubbles out.

Never run the car low on coolant, not just due to risk of overheating but that will also cause you to add air bubbles to the system that are not easy to get out.
 

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Yeah, just keep the level in that range and you can't hurt anything.

1. Engine off, drain as much as you can
2. Engine still off, fill as much fresh coolant mix (50/50) as you can in the reservoir.
3. Reservoir cap off, start engine, start draining, keep topping off the reservoir as the level drops. Helps to have two people. Once the stuff you're draining looks "fresh" then stop draining.
4. Keep engine running, reservoir cap off, this is how it will "burp" out the air bubbles in the system. If the level gets too high, shut the car off and let it cool, then repeat once. This should be enough to get the air bubbles out.

Never run the car low on coolant, not just due to risk of overheating but that will also cause you to add air bubbles to the system that are not easy to get out.
I did it a little differently. I drained what I had in the radiator, then added distilled water, let it circulate and repeated two more times.

First drain was dark, second was medium, and third was nearly clear. Then I added pure anti freeze. each drain of the radiator left about a gallon in the block. Yes I burped it the same as you.
 

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I did it a little differently. I drained what I had in the radiator, then added distilled water, let it circulate and repeated two more times.

First drain was dark, second was medium, and third was nearly clear. Then I added pure anti freeze. each drain of the radiator left about a gallon in the block. Yes I burped it the same as you.
That works fine too, but I would always only add the 50/50 mix rather than add water first and coolant later... how do you get the right mix in the end?
 

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That works fine too, but I would always only add the 50/50 mix rather than add water first and coolant later... how do you get the right mix in the end?
I like to play with math. System holds two gallons (not sure of S80, but my Astra and her X90 2.5 hold about two gallons), drain 50/50, add H2O, drain 25/75, add H2O, drain 12.5/87.5, add 100%, run, and use tester. This way I'm not dumping out new anti freeze. If I had a four gallon system I would try to drain from the block, but my Astra doesn't have a block drain, and I was afraid to do it on the XC90. My luck something in the block would strip or leak.
 

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I like to play with math. System holds two gallons (not sure of S80, but my Astra and her X90 2.5 hold about two gallons), drain 50/50, add H2O, drain 25/75, add H2O, drain 12.5/87.5, add 100%, run, and use tester. This way I'm not dumping out new anti freeze. If I had a four gallon system I would try to drain from the block, but my Astra doesn't have a block drain, and I was afraid to do it on the XC90. My luck something in the block would strip or leak.
In each of your drain steps, you must be measuring how much you drain right? (In order to know how much to add next and what the resulting ratio would be...)
 
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