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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

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Yes, we fitted them about two years ago to the front seatbacks , for we have two kids in forward-facing carseats in the middle row. The seat protection is durable andworks well in keeping the seatbacks clean.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
i was thinking of using it for the drivers seat when wearing dark jeans as a seat protector


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Now I understand your question. I apologize for my previous response to your query.

I just turned the protective cover around to the driver's seat cushion and seat-back in my car, as you are considering. First, Volvo's kick-guard seat protector is sufficiently wide to cover the seat's side bolsters. Second, the lower edge of the seat protector lacks a means to secure itself to the seat cushion. While not an issue when used with a child's seat, you may dislike the way that the seat protector slides around when the front seat's occupant exits the car.

I love the Blonde and Amber leather upholstery options in the XC90, but opted for the Charcoal leather in my car after reading owners' posts on this forum about denim dye transfer with the lighter leather colors.

I hope this helps you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Now I understand your question. I apologize for my previous response to your query.

I just turned the protective cover around to the driver's seat cushion and seat-back in my car, as you are considering. First, Volvo's kick-guard seat protector is sufficiently wide to cover the seat's side bolsters. Second, the lower edge of the seat protector lacks a means to secure itself to the seat cushion. While not an issue when used with a child's seat, you may dislike the way that the seat protector slides around when the front seat's occupant exits the car.

I love the Blonde and Amber leather upholstery options in the XC90, but opted for the Charcoal leather in my car after reading owners' posts on this forum about denim dye transfer with the lighter leather colors.

I hope this helps you.
Sure it does, thank you.
I have the kick guard but it is still sealed...
It’s not the color that troubles me, it’s the durability of the leather itself....which i guess is the same no matter the color.


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...
It’s not the color that troubles me, it’s the durability of the leather itself....which i guess is the same no matter the color...
Yeah. I've had many different types of leather in every one of my vehicles over the past 20+ years. Volvo nappa leather appears to be similar to the softness I've known in my last several Lexus, whereas my former MBZ, BMW and present Tesla are comfortable and beautiful, but much harder to the touch. Personally, I have had zero problems with unexpected leather wear in any of my vehicles. Some considerations:

  • I suggest placing a cover of some sort (like the kick guard being discussed) over the nappa leather seat itself, could in fact cause it's own sort of wear on the seat -- it's gonna rub as you sit on top of it and also have the potential of dye transfer itself, but to me, perhaps most importantly is a semi-permanent cover may introduce a new problem where any hidden dirt or crumbs that may get between it and the seat will have a tendency of "grinding" into the leather more than if it was visible and you probably wiped it away in normal use. I personally think it's a subjective toss-up as to how much "more or less" wear an intermediate cover may have except for that grinding concern I have.
    • That being said, I never put things like baby seats, etc in my cars, but if I did, I would first ensure the seat is clean, then place some very light material -- like a piece of old clean white T-shirt -- under the places where the plastic or object would be sitting and rubbing on the leather seats themselves. I've always done that when hauling something that temporarily touches my precious leather, then take it out when I'm done. ;)
    • I don't go shirtless driving my vehicle as some guys do here in SoCal, and I'm not a surfer or beach person that may wear wet clothes in my vehicle, but if I did, I likely would not opt for leather seats in the first place, or I would come up with some specific method for trying to prevent damage to my seats in those specific times (a temporary clean towel comes to mind, and is what I do use when I head for the beach and come back home with dry shorts on.) Anyway...
  • The place where I always have more "wear", but actually just what I'd call "wrinkle lines" is on the lower entry driver's side bolster. It's from my butt rubbing on the elevated area as I get in and out of the vehicle. I tend to hydrate and clean this smaller area perhaps twice as often as the whole seat as a preventive measure.
  • Dye transfer is gonna happen on any color. It's just a question of how visible it is. Black or Charcoal leather seats I've had, also get it when I have cleaned them with a light-colored cloth, no different than red, beige, or ecru (off-white -- in a convertible no less!) nappa leather seating I've owned. I firmly believe that proper ongoing maintenance (see next bullet) will keep this problem in-check, no matter the color. It's more of the point that if you have darker colored leather, you may personally be OK not cleaning as often, simply because you don't see the dirt that is still there and be more visible on lighter colors -- so be that. ;)
  • My method for keeping leather seats in their best shape is to #1 keep them hydrated. We must remember that even though most leathers today have a coating of some sort applied during tanning/manufacturing, underneath, they are still a natural skin -- no different than your face, hands or body -- which will wrinkle over time and can generally benefit from some moisture especially in lower humidity environments.
    • I quickly wipe my seats down with a clean and lightly damp microfiber cloth (not drippy) after every hand wash of my vehicle (which is every week or two max)
    • Every few weeks I spend an extra 5-10 minutes using my leather cleaner of choice with a clean microfiber rag to clean the outside lower bolster, and reapply a conditioner (both of which are subjects unto themselves, as their use are controversial to some based on the exact way a specific leather is coated or not, and there are many different products people prefer -- no different than other detailing regime methods.) I keep my head & hair just slightly in front of the headrest while driving, and don't generally place my elbows on either arm rest, but if I did -- those would be the three other areas I'd do the same.
    • I live in Southern California (coastal desert) where humidity is generally lower than many other places, and I'd say every 6-8 months or so I do a more thorough cleaning of my leather seats, with reapplication of conditioner once the car is in my garage and before I lock it up for a few hours to dry. I would move that schedule up if I used the car even more than I do. Some people do it more frequently than me, but I personally have not found any difference. (My personal test if I need to do this procedure more often is how clean the microfiber cloth remains after a full wipe-down/cleaning of the seats -- with the exception of the bolster like I've said that is always a bit dirtier than the rest. I keep my moon roof open quite often, and don't find that to be a big problem; OTOH, both of my previous convertibles required me to move the cleaning frequency up quite a bit as I'm able to keep the top down almost year-round here in SoCal.)

Good luck with your decision -- but I wouldn't really be worried as you suggest you are. Just remember, treat your seats with a bit of kindness and a little preventive maintenance, no different than you do your face, hands and body, and your leather seats will likely wear well for years without a lot of fuss or problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Bert,

Really elaborative input here from your side...
I agree one all points here..

I will do the first treatment in a couple of days (Volvo Leather Kit).

''I keep my head & hair just slightly in front of the headrest while driving, and don't generally place my elbows on either arm rest, but if I did -- those would be the three other areas I'd do the same.'' LOL. Now that's a little obsessive !!!!! LOL

I don't care about these, but i don't sweat at all and i wear shirts/suits most of the time..

Aside all these, i do find the perforated leather - especially between the holes- to be more sensitive than other brands, BMW, PORSCHE, JEEP, MERCEDES..
Hope they won't disappoint me, because i saw the Nappa Leather seats -non perforated-(which is standard equipment in Greece), in my test drive car, and
although they were the Blonde Color, they were holding up very well, but of course they were not the perforated ones..
 

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I had perforated seats (center of bottom and back) on my previous Lexus RX450h, which had a very similar feel to the nappa leather perforated seats I tried in the XC60 and XC60 test drives. My Lexus showed no signs of problems in the perforated areas after nearly 4 years of ownership, only wrinkles on the driver outside lower bolster as I explained above. As you say, time will tell with the Volvo, but I suspect their leather quality will be at least on par with what I know from the Japanese luxury brand.

Oh, and yeah, I wear shirts all the time while driving too, but, well, what can I say -- I live in "sometimes crazy" California, only 4-5 miles from the beach communities where a bunch of surfer dudes are always hanging out. AH HA. Good luck with your new XC90! ENJOY!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I had perforated seats (center of bottom and back) on my previous Lexus RX450h, which had a very similar feel to the nappa leather perforated seats I tried in the XC60 and XC60 test drives. My Lexus showed no signs of problems in the perforated areas after nearly 4 years of ownership, only wrinkles on the driver outside lower bolster as I explained above. As you say, time will tell with the Volvo, but I suspect their leather quality will be at least on par with what I know from the Japanese luxury brand.

Oh, and yeah, I wear shirts all the time while driving too, but, well, what can I say -- I live in "sometimes crazy" California, only 4-5 miles from the beach communities where a bunch of surfer dudes are always hanging out. AH HA. Good luck with your new XC90! ENJOY!
Thanks buddy , now waiting to see if a Polestar optimization will be an option in the future..


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