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Hi all, my name is Eric and I am no longer one of your board trolls! I've been searching for the last year for something to replace my IROC-Z and 2 weeks ago I found a 1980 Volvo 240 GT on Craigslist and scooped it up. It has definitely seen some better days, but it's my first real project to learn everything about a car and eventually to get into road racing. <p>Anyway, I want to introduce myself to the whole "club" and ask some questions. This car, for as much fun as I day dream I will have in it, isn't running just yet. I believe I have the B23F (non-turbo) with the 4sp with electronic overdrive (overall the car is still a mystery for the options it has). It came with several Volvo shop manuals, but unfortunately I only have the Haynes manual for regarding the engine rebuild.<p>The car came into my possession *mostly* together and not running (hoses disconnected/dry rotted and a few spliced wires here or there). My dad and I started from by inspecting the engine bay, cleaning battery terminals, tapping the electric fuel pump to get it to work again, regapping and cleaning spark plugs, checking spark plug wires (and other wires we know to check), cleaning out the Venturi (and rubber bubble) and cold start injector, and tonight we cleaned 1, 2, and 4th injectors (third is hard to get to and it's late). <p>After all of this, the car will still not crank over. We're unfamiliar with the electronic system (outside of what it says in the Haynes book) and MAF sensor and we don't know if an important sensor is unplugged-- we're GM guys... and this is the first foreign car in the family... ever. Anyway, we're at a loss because the we have spark, we have fuel (we drained out the Varnish and put in premium) -- cylinder one is flooding and the other three seem normal. The guy who I bought this from sounded halfway knowledeable about it and said the fuel return line is where the problem is at and why it's preventing a startup. Any advice of what to check/clean next? I'm very eager to learn this car from top to bottom, but it's hard when I'm piecing back a puzzle that i'm not sure I have all the pieces to ( <IMG NAME="icon" SRC="http://www.vwvortex.com/zeroforum_graphics/screwy.gif" BORDER="0"> ). <p>I'll post some photos when I get the chance.
 

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Re: Just bought my first Volvo (Sleazy_E)

Welcome to Swedespeed, Eric.<p>Coupla quick checks...<p> - the ground wire for the fuel injection electrics and each electrical connection at each injector and the FI power supply wire from the + post on the battery (and any fusable link).<p> - The fuel pump relay under the dash.<p> - fuel pressure at the manifold.<p> - fuel pressure regulator near the fuel rail including attached fuel return line.<p>The electronic control unit could be faulty which implies that the car will not start regardless of other properly functioning elements.<p>Download this...<p><A HREF="http://pro3dgraphics.ath.cx/volvo/240/TP30454_1.pdf" TARGET="_blank">http://pro3dgraphics.ath.cx/vo...1.pdf</A><p>...and save a copy on your pc/laptop for something to read/print proving that I am not familiar with the FI system on an '80 240 GT.<p>George Dill<p>
 

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Re: Just bought my first Volvo (Sleazy_E)

I owned a 1980 240 GT for 13 years, and liked it a great deal. It has a B21 engine.
 

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Re: Just bought my first Volvo (pjf)

Yes, a B21 unless someone has changed it.<br>No fuel rail on this baby, you have a fuel distributor. It's under the intake manifold and has hose lines going up to each injector. If only one injector is getting fuel, you may have a big problem on your hands as the fuel distrib could be bad or cruded up. You have to have around 50 PSI for this system to work and testing for it involves some special fittings.<br>The fuel dist is attached to a plate that's in the housing under the intake manifold and is connected with a big rubber baloon as you described. As air is pulled into the engine, it lifts the plate and adjusts the amount of fuel flow. The more air flow, the more fuel. You need to find a good service manual to explain it more fully.
 
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