SwedeSpeed - Volvo Performance Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,209 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I installed my IPD R (mechanical) boost gauge and CF Werks door gauge pod about 3 months ago and considering the rumors that this setup is not possible, I thought I would do a write-up. I'll go as step-by step as I can from start to finish so that anyone wanting to try this will be able to with less trial and error.







Here are the materials I used:

Boost gauge (including t-fitting, clamps, boost line, and compression fittings)
CF Werks door pod
Several feet of 16-18 gauge wire
In-line wire splicers
Male/female connectors for wires
Silicone RTV
Spray paint (optional)
Beer (not optional)

SHORT VERSION:

- Paint the door pod.
- Rout the boost line from the engine bay to the door jamb connector.
- Drill out one of the empty pin locations on the connector with a 1/8" drill bit so that the boost line can be pushed through.
- Rout the boost line the rest of the way through the door to the gauge location.
- Create an RTV mold-ish thing in the pod using wax paper as a "release agent" for the gauge (if you are worried about the gauge being removable).
- RTV the pod to the door.
- Connect the gauge up, and install in the pod.
- Drink up!

LONG VERSION:

I ordered the FRP door pod from Henry at CF Werks; it arrived after several weeks primed and ready to be painted. The quality and craftsmanship were fantastic and almost no prep work needed to be done for painting. I created a crude paint hanger out of a wire coat hanger, which turned out to be very helpful and gave a perfect final product. I sprayed 3 coats of Valspar Flat Black Enamel spraypaint which turned out to be a near perfect match to the original triangular door piece. I bought a can of Satin finish as well but it wasn't a match (I did a test on a section of PVC). I did the painting first so that I could let it cure for the full 36 hours while I was working on the other steps.

Next order of business was running the boost tubing. To get to the manifold hose where the T-fitting will go, remove the "R" cowling over the engine. I had to loosen the forward OTE pipe clamp in order to get to one of the torx bolts. I also removed the lowest dash panel for easy access under the dash. I decided to run the tubing through the firewall at the penetration for the hood release cable. It is the large whitish tube under the dash by the clutch pedal. The hole it went through seemed to have enough clearance for the small diameter boost line. I poked a length of stiff electrical wire through the hole into the engine compartment and was able to snake it through the emissions lines, under the airbox, and up to where I wanted to splice into the manifold hose. That was the easy part.

Next step is getting the boost line from the chassis to the door. Use a non-scratching "bone tool" or equivalent to pry off the leather door handle cover, then remove the 2 torx screws and the 8ish quick release fasteners holding the door card on. Remove the door card, clearing the lock pin and disconnecting the 3 electrical connectors and the latch cable. Cut the tie wrap holding the rectangular plastic cover on the door, pull the cover off, and let it hang. Now back in the chassis, find the penetration by the hood release lever. I removed the bolt securing the lever so that I had more room to work. I also pulled the plastic door sill cover for the same reason. I found it helpful to remove the rubber boots over the electrical connectors on the door jamb. I snaked another length of stiff wire from the chassis penetration up to the electrical connecter boot, using some mild dish soap and water for lubrication. In the same manner as before I pulled the tubing through by taping it to the wire.

The next step is modifying the electrical connector to allow the boost line to run through it. There are 3 unused pins, 2 of which are for larger gauge wires. I used the uppermost large empty spot for my boost line. If you are lucky enough to be able to unbolt the connector from the door, modifying it will be much easier. My bolts seemed to now want to come out, so I did my modifications on the car. I put a 1/8" drill bit in a pin vice and went to town drilling out the plastic in the connectors by hand from the inside of the door. Word to the wise: drill the connector while both sides are engaged, otherwise you run the risk of getting plastic chips stuck where they will not let the two halves seat properly…as I did. By the time you are done, you should have a 1/8" hole running through the connector parallel to the wires. Shove the boost line through this hole to the inside of the door panel, being very cautious of kinking the tube. Now you can feed that stiff electrical wire through the rubber boot inside the door, pull through your boost line, and your boost should be good to go. To get power to the gauge, use one of the other empty spots in the connector. If you can find the pieces to add extra pins on the connector, great, but if not just use the same technique that was used for the boost line and run the electrical wire to the fuse box.

At this point reattach the rubber boots and the plastic cover that was removed. Rout the boost line and power cable up to the mirror. For a ground, I tapped into pin #6 (the black wire) of the green connector for the mirror using an inline splicer. This wire is only grounded when the connectors on the door card are plugged in, so don't be alarmed if there is no continuity without the door card. Also, do not use the door as a ground because it isn't one. Once this is all done and the boost line and wires are routed, put the door card back on.

The next steps were my best solution to installing the gauge in the pod while still allowing it to be removable. If you aren't worried about that, just RTV it in there and it won't be an issue. My idea was to create a sort of mold out of RTV that would have enough friction to keep the gauge pod in, but would still allow me to remove the gauge. I wrapped the gauge in wax paper, inserted it into the pod, and created a collar of RTV around the gauge. I then let it cure, removed the gauge and wax paper, and reinstalled the gauge. Installing the pod is easy; just lay a bead of RTV around the outside of the pod and hold it to the door with tape as it cures. I found that shutting the door was enough to keep the pod situated while it cured.

3 months later, I couldn't be happier with the installation. The boost gauge works flawlessly and I'm not worried at all about kinks, even in sub freezing temperatures. The RTV mold technique has worked amazingly well, it never vibrates or shifts even a mm but I can pull it out in about 1 second with no tools. Overall I don't think it could have turned out better.























Modified by Evos_R at 9:59 AM 11-23-2009
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,368 Posts
Re: IPD R Boost Gauge with CF Werks Door Pod Writeup (Evos_R)

Awesome writeup, looks great!! http://********************/smile/emthup.gif http://********************/smile/emthup.gif
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
581 Posts
Thanks for the great writeup. I am hoping to get time to do this install this week, but with an electrical gauge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
914 Posts
Haha I was gonna do this like Wednesday so thanks for bringing this up again..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,692 Posts
Oh the old gauge pod debate still lives!!! Lol, some things never change.

Bezel Pod FTW. May still be pics in my sig or search Fitzy Bezel Pod and enjoy.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top